Cheapest MIDI keyboard

Discussion in 'Sequencing Hardware' started by milee, Jun 5, 2003.

  1. milee

    milee New Member

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    I need one just for note-writting, not sequencing. Does someone know some model, and price for it?
  2. fubar21

    fubar21 New Member

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    Go down to ur nearest Tandy store and buy one for $100 brand new
  3. poweringer

    poweringer New Member

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    Use G O O G L E and try to find a nice keyboard! It's easier ... in my opinion.
  4. fawk_jo

    fawk_jo New Member

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    Does anybody know a good machine for a newbee? Nothing fance, just simple (and CHEAP)! :rolleyes:
  5. Spybreak

    Spybreak New Member

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    google works :)
  6. saxyguy

    saxyguy New Member

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  7. connersyeah

    connersyeah New Member

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    yeah i totally agree
  8. jazzy_jay

    jazzy_jay New Member

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  9. titanicm14

    titanicm14 New Member

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    There are many places you could go such as radioshack.com and get pretty decent midi keyboards now if you want more keys they will cost you up in the 500s but general very basic midi that can be done with maybe 50 off the internet 75 -125 on the street (in stores) try yahoo.com type in musical keyboards and then click on shopping and that should give you a list of things and then narrow them down to a price range that you are looking for and that should give you between 60 and 120 for what you are looking for. Yahoo is fairly honest about their prices unlike others who mislead you to their sites and then tell you the real price after you check out.. good luck
  10. bnjiman80

    bnjiman80 Tangled Up In Blue

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    second hand worked for me

    Hi all

    Another option is to have a look on ebay.

    I found an ad. for an old Yamaha PSR-84 from 1994. It was badly advertised, so no-one bid on it. I downloaded the manual as a PDF and found it was quite big (5 octaves of 4/5th size keys), midi compatible, had touch-sensitive keys, footswitch and a pitch bend stick. You can split the keyboard to record to two midi channels as well. It also big enough to rest music on and has its own stand. As it has internal memory, I can switch it on a record bits and bobs and upload the midi data to my pc later - it works ok as a stand alone unit. (Well, I use a little synth box to get good voices.) Although its old, it was good back in the day. The only drawback is only 24 note polyphony - I have once had prolems recording a fast chordal rhythm which I think might be due to ths. (I paid the reserve of £50 / $70.)

    I guess the advantage to getting a midi controller is that it will come with a USB interface. However if you get the USB interface seperately and a second-hand keyboard, you will might get a more equipped keyboard for your money, especially if you are lucky enough to get a good branded one that has been well looked after. Also, you could get a USB midi interface that also does good quality line-in recording, should you wish to play or sing along with your midis on the pc (adding wav tracks with your midi tracks).

    Good luck!
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2004
  11. madskilzz9

    madskilzz9 New Member

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  12. djthaoboie

    djthaoboie New Member

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    how much do a regular midi quitar cost
  13. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

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    A "Roland Ready" Stratocaster (which has a GK2 hexaphonic pickup fitted into it) will cost you $550 upwards on the street.

    Alternatively, you can buy the pickup separately and add it to any guitar of your choice - not sure how much - around $200, I would think. On top of the guitar/pickup itself, you will need a pitch to midi converter and a sound module to turn the midi stream into something worthwhile listening to :).

    Roland are the only major company offering such stuff new. They can supply separate units, as above, and also combined converters/sound modules. Which way to go rather depends on what you want to use it for.

    The combined units will give you quick results, but don't drive external modules so well, thus limiting your expansion options. However, they're reasonably priced (check out the GR range). A separate P/M convertor (GI-20) will drive any one module as well as another. Modules range from cheap to extremely expensive - depends what you want in the way of sounds.

    Other than Roland, you're pretty limited. There's the Axon converter, but it's expensive ($800 + and you still need a module to make sounds), the support is not very good and you're not likely to find one in your local store.

    NOTE:

    If you are thinking about using a midi guitar as a controller for sequencing work, think carefully about this and do try it out first. It's a totally different instrument to play - and extremely unforgiving of sloppy technique.

    These instruments can produce all sorts of little things you wouldn't want - OK in a live performance, but a PITA in the studio - you can end up doing spending more time editing the midi file than you spent playing it. Probably better to use a keyboard as a controller in this case.

    If you can't play keys, then there are other options (Ztar for a guitar player, EWI for a horn player, etc.).

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