Chord Analyser

Discussion in 'comp.music.midi' started by Steven Briggs, Jun 2, 2003.

  1. Does anyone know of a (preferably free), app/VST that analyzes MIDI notes
    and tells you what chord it is? Alternatively, one that you type in notes
    and it tells you what chord it is?

    I've looked all over and can't find one....

    Any advice would be appreciated.

    Thanks
  2. Band-in-a-Box creates chord sheets from imported midi files.

    >Does anyone know of a (preferably free), app/VST that analyzes MIDI notes
    >and tells you what chord it is? Alternatively, one that you type in notes
    >and it tells you what chord it is?
    >
    >I've looked all over and can't find one....
    >
    >Any advice would be appreciated.
    >
    >Thanks
    >



    CubaseFAQ page www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm
  3. JB Seattle

    JB Seattle Guest

    Powertracks from www.pgmusic.com the same people that make band in a box is
    the best I have used.
    Also GNMidi from www.gnmidi.com is pretty good too.
    JB
    "Steven Briggs" <steven.briggs@occamgreen.com> wrote in message
    news:bbfiep$cas$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk...
    > Does anyone know of a (preferably free), app/VST that analyzes MIDI notes
    > and tells you what chord it is? Alternatively, one that you type in notes
    > and it tells you what chord it is?
    >
    > I've looked all over and can't find one....
    >
    > Any advice would be appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
  4. Al Stevens

    Al Stevens Guest

    "Steven Briggs" <steven.briggs@occamgreen.com> wrote in message
    news:bbfiep$cas$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk...
    > Does anyone know of a (preferably free), app/VST that analyzes MIDI notes
    > and tells you what chord it is? Alternatively, one that you type in notes
    > and it tells you what chord it is?


    http://www.alstevens.com/midifitz/

    It's free, and it tells you what the chord is that you play on a MIDI
    keyboard. It can also generate realtime drums and bass accompaniment.
  5. PC

    PC Guest

    "Steven Briggs" <steven.briggs@occamgreen.com> wrote in message
    news:bbfiep$cas$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk...
    > Does anyone know of a (preferably free), app/VST


    you already said it.

    VST does that in the editor page
  6. Angeline J.

    Angeline J. Guest

    "Steven Briggs" <steven.briggs@occamgreen.com> wrote in message
    news:bbfiep$cas$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk...
    > Does anyone know of a (preferably free), app/VST that analyzes MIDI notes
    > and tells you what chord it is? Alternatively, one that you type in notes
    > and it tells you what chord it is?
    >
    > I've looked all over and can't find one....
    >
    > Any advice would be appreciated.





    You'll be a much better musician and composer if you learn how to identify
    and analyze the chords yourself.
  7. Angeline J.

    Angeline J. Guest

    "Steven Briggs" <steven.briggs@occamgreen.com> wrote in message
    news:bbfiep$cas$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk...
    > Does anyone know of a (preferably free), app/VST that analyzes MIDI notes
    > and tells you what chord it is? Alternatively, one that you type in notes
    > and it tells you what chord it is?
    >
    > I've looked all over and can't find one....
    >
    > Any advice would be appreciated.





    You'll be a much better musician and composer if you learn how to identify
    and analyze the chords yourself.
  8. Nemo

    Nemo Guest

    "Angeline J." <fatsupermodel.takethisout@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:fCWCa.5058

    > You'll be a much better musician and composer if you learn how to identify
    > and analyze the chords yourself.


    I hate the people making stupid assertion when asking for something useful.
    Evidently finding a program that helps you identifing weird chords can help
    you improve your skills.

    Why don't you think before speak?
  9. Angeline J.

    Angeline J. Guest

    "Nemo" <nemo@virgilio.it> wrote in message
    news:TduDa.41910$pR3.903190@news1.tin.it...
    >
    > "Angeline J." <fatsupermodel.takethisout@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:fCWCa.5058
    >
    > > You'll be a much better musician and composer if you learn how to

    identify
    > > and analyze the chords yourself.

    >
    > I hate the people making stupid assertion when asking for something

    useful.
    > Evidently finding a program that helps you identifing weird chords can

    help
    > you improve your skills.
    >
    > Why don't you think before speak?





    It's better to get a book which helps one identify 'weird' chords. Learning
    how chords are put together is central to gaining a greater understanding of
    how music works. If we want to become the best composers we can be (I assume
    that is a goal of everyone here), we must have an understanding of music
    theory.

    Besides, those programs won't work all the time. In a complex piece the
    third and the fifth will often be missing (on purpose). In very complex
    harmonic pieces, the root note can be missing most of the time. It's called
    "implied harmony". example: George Shearing's arrangement of "Over the
    Rainbow".

    Thus far, the computer is no substitute for the human mind. Try using one of
    the translation websites on a foreign language news article and you'll get
    the idea.
  10. >> You'll be a much better musician and composer if you learn how to identify
    >> and analyze the chords yourself.

    >
    >I hate the people making stupid assertion when asking for something useful.
    >Evidently finding a program that helps you identifing weird chords can help
    >you improve your skills.
    >
    >Why don't you think before speak?
    >


    Unfortunately, the weirder the chord, the less likely it is that a
    program will give you useful information.

    CubaseFAQ page www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm
  11. FRETBUZZ

    FRETBUZZ Guest

    Re the program to identify chord names:

    Let's not forget that in many cases, when you start adding extra notes to a
    basic chord triad, it can then have 2 or more names - basic examples:

    the chord has the notes F A C D and the names F6 or Dm7
    the chord has the notes FACE and the names FMajor7 OR Am6

    I know it's a bit Luddite to suggest this to a computer based newsgroup...
    but maybe getting hold of a guitarist's chord bible (with notation) would
    help - after all, you know the note names so it would merely be a case of
    flicking through the pages till you get to the appropriate root note or a
    page showing a chord with the right notes in it; granted this is a bit of
    extra work...but it will help you remember the chord names and possible
    alternatives as well, plus the better ones often include a theory tutorial
    about chord construction.

    Regards

    "Laurence Payne" <l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:kq7udvg2311lgokusgubqgnb7fbo62jmtb@4ax.com...
    > >> You'll be a much better musician and composer if you learn how to

    identify
    > >> and analyze the chords yourself.

    > >
    > >I hate the people making stupid assertion when asking for something

    useful.
    > >Evidently finding a program that helps you identifing weird chords can

    help
    > >you improve your skills.
    > >
    > >Why don't you think before speak?
    > >

    >
    > Unfortunately, the weirder the chord, the less likely it is that a
    > program will give you useful information.
    >
    > CubaseFAQ page www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm



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  12. In article <bbt13f$rv7$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk>, FRETBUZZ
    <fretbuzz01@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > Let's not forget that in many cases, when you start adding extra notes to a
    > basic chord triad, it can then have 2 or more names - basic examples:
    >
    > the chord has the notes F A C D and the names F6 or Dm7
    > the chord has the notes FACE and the names FMajor7 OR Am6
    >
    > I know it's a bit Luddite to suggest this to a computer based newsgroup...
    > but maybe getting hold of a guitarist's chord bible (with notation) would
    > help - after all, you know the note names so it would merely be a case of
    > flicking through the pages...


    Someone already mentioned education as a replacement for the program.
    "You shouldn't WANT a car, because a bike is cheaper."

    I know of no program dedicated to this task, but found that feature in
    Emagic's Logic sequencer recently. I play a clot of notes with an Oxy8
    and in the transport bar it is analyzing every damn thing on the fly.
    And pretty well too; even playing odd bass notes gives me "slash"
    chords. But it's certainly not free.

    --
    ///---
  13. Angeline J.

    Angeline J. Guest

    "FRETBUZZ" <fretbuzz01@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:bbt13f$rv7$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...
    > Re the program to identify chord names:
    >
    > Let's not forget that in many cases, when you start adding extra notes to

    a
    > basic chord triad, it can then have 2 or more names - basic examples:
    >
    > the chord has the notes F A C D and the names F6 or Dm7
    > the chord has the notes FACE and the names FMajor7 OR Am6



    Determining which chord it is depends upon the context of the chord, ie.
    what chord precedes it, what chord succeeds it, what key is it in and what
    sort of harmonic structure does the song use?


    > I know it's a bit Luddite to suggest this to a computer based newsgroup...
    > but maybe getting hold of a guitarist's chord bible (with notation) would
    > help - after all, you know the note names so it would merely be a case of
    > flicking through the pages till you get to the appropriate root note or a
    > page showing a chord with the right notes in it; granted this is a bit of
    > extra work...but it will help you remember the chord names and possible
    > alternatives as well, plus the better ones often include a theory tutorial
    > about chord construction.



    In the long run, learning new harmonic structures and how they work, *why* a
    progression has a certain feel to it - that's the real payoff. Gaining more
    knowledge, more options, becoming a better composer.
  14. Angeline J.

    Angeline J. Guest

    "Gerry Scott-Moore" <222ggg@adelphia.net.invalid> wrote in message
    news:070620030930225349%222ggg@adelphia.net.invalid...
    > In article <bbt13f$rv7$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk>, FRETBUZZ
    > <fretbuzz01@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Let's not forget that in many cases, when you start adding extra notes

    to a
    > > basic chord triad, it can then have 2 or more names - basic examples:
    > >
    > > the chord has the notes F A C D and the names F6 or Dm7
    > > the chord has the notes FACE and the names FMajor7 OR Am6
    > >
    > > I know it's a bit Luddite to suggest this to a computer based

    newsgroup...
    > > but maybe getting hold of a guitarist's chord bible (with notation)

    would
    > > help - after all, you know the note names so it would merely be a case

    of
    > > flicking through the pages...

    >
    > Someone already mentioned education as a replacement for the program.
    > "You shouldn't WANT a car, because a bike is cheaper."



    <snip>


    Actually, it's: you should want to learn something because good music comes
    from people who understand music, not people who know how to run a computer
    program.
  15. In article <8cqEa.1629$Jw6.1184028@news1.news.adelphia.net>, Angeline
    J. <fatsupermodel.takethisout@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > Actually, it's: you should want to learn something because good music comes
    > from people who understand music, not people who know how to run a computer
    > program.


    The fallacy comes right after anything beginning with the phrase "You
    should want...".

    I know music inside and out; much better than computers. But that
    doesn't preclude me from looking for a tool to do faster those things I
    can already do. Like printing instead of hand-scoring.

    --
    ///---
  16. In article <m8qEa.1626$Jw6.1182626@news1.news.adelphia.net>, Angeline
    J. <fatsupermodel.takethisout@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > Determining which chord it is depends upon the context of the chord, ie.
    > what chord precedes it, what chord succeeds it, what key is it in and what
    > sort of harmonic structure does the song use?


    Most frequently context is irrelevant in assigning a name to collection
    of chord tones. If a chord can only be analyzed by context, it's going
    to ber a tough chord to analyze anyway. Most are not.

    --
    ///---
  17. Angeline J.

    Angeline J. Guest

    "Gerry Scott-Moore" <222ggg@adelphia.net.invalid> wrote in message
    news:070620031506271367%222ggg@adelphia.net.invalid...
    > In article <8cqEa.1629$Jw6.1184028@news1.news.adelphia.net>, Angeline
    > J. <fatsupermodel.takethisout@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Actually, it's: you should want to learn something because good music

    comes
    > > from people who understand music, not people who know how to run a

    computer
    > > program.

    >
    > The fallacy comes right after anything beginning with the phrase "You
    > should want...".
    >
    > I know music inside and out; much better than computers. But that
    > doesn't preclude me from looking for a tool to do faster those things I
    > can already do. Like printing instead of hand-scoring.



    Thing is, the computers don't do a good job of analyzing weird chords (the
    original poster's need)
  18. Angeline J.

    Angeline J. Guest

    "Gerry Scott-Moore" <222ggg@adelphia.net.invalid> wrote in message news:070620031508117620%222ggg@adelphia.net.invalid...
    > In article <m8qEa.1626$Jw6.1182626@news1.news.adelphia.net>, Angeline
    > J. <fatsupermodel.takethisout@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Determining which chord it is depends upon the context of the chord, ie.
    > > what chord precedes it, what chord succeeds it, what key is it in and what
    > > sort of harmonic structure does the song use?

    >
    > Most frequently context is irrelevant in assigning a name to collection
    > of chord tones. If a chord can only be analyzed by context, it's going
    > to ber a tough chord to analyze anyway. Most are not.
    >



    So, as FRETBUZZ wrote:

    > Let's not forget that in many cases, when you start adding extra notes to a
    > basic chord triad, it can then have 2 or more names - basic examples:
    >
    > the chord has the notes F A C D and the names F6 or Dm7
    > the chord has the notes FACE and the names FMajor7 OR Am6



    In both of those cases, the context will determine the label.
  19. In article <bVCEa.1917$Jw6.1434511@news1.news.adelphia.net>, Angeline
    J. <fatsupermodel.takethisout@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > > I know music inside and out; much better than computers. But that
    > > doesn't preclude me from looking for a tool to do faster those things I
    > > can already do. Like printing instead of hand-scoring.

    >
    > Thing is, the computers don't do a good job of analyzing weird chords (the
    > original poster's need)


    The OP never used the words weird, odd, complex or unusual. For all I
    know he's analyzing triads.

    Nevertheless computers do well what we teach them to do. Overture and
    Logic both do an exceptional job of such chord analysis. Certainly they
    can be faked out by a C Maj 9 with the 3rd in the bass, calling it a
    Em7. But then a human could argue that it really is a Em7 in function.

    What kind of weird chords do you believe a computer can't be taught to
    identify?

    --
    ///---
  20. In article <JYCEa.1918$Jw6.1435283@news1.news.adelphia.net>, Angeline
    J. <fatsupermodel.takethisout@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > > > Determining which chord it is depends upon the context of the chord, ie.
    > > > what chord precedes it, what chord succeeds it, what key is it in and what
    > > > sort of harmonic structure does the song use?

    > >
    > > Most frequently context is irrelevant in assigning a name to collection
    > > of chord tones. If a chord can only be analyzed by context, it's going
    > > to ber a tough chord to analyze anyway. Most are not.
    > >

    >
    >
    > So, as FRETBUZZ wrote:
    >
    > > Let's not forget that in many cases, when you start adding extra notes to a
    > > basic chord triad, it can then have 2 or more names - basic examples:
    > >
    > > the chord has the notes F A C D and the names F6 or Dm7
    > > the chord has the notes FACE and the names FMajor7 OR Am6


    That's not quite right. The later chord in eac example would be better
    "named" be Dm7/F and Am6/F. Either than or the bass function is
    unimportant. And if the bass funtion is unimportant that it doesn't
    matter which you name it.

    > In both of those cases, the context will determine the label.


    As my other post emphasizes, I'm not sure that context always makes
    this chord non-ambiguous. For example, most of the time I see a
    diminished chord identified in sheet music it's a 7b9 chord with a 3rd
    (or other non-root) in the bass.

    Computer programs and human brains are both capable of a great deal of
    ambiguity, contradiction and differing of "opinions". So while a
    program can't resolve all chord assemblies, neither can a musician.

    --
    ///---

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