Drums

Discussion in 'General Sequencing' started by PENNY16161, Dec 28, 2002.

  1. PENNY16161

    PENNY16161 New Member

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    I cannot for the life of me sequence the drum part to any song. Is there anyone who can give me some pointers (not for it to sound real - just for it to match the real song) - or does someone want to sequence drums for my sequences? That'd be :cool: . Anyway, let me know! Thanks.

    Brett
  2. Rajeev

    Rajeev New Member

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    Maybe you can try using a drum track from an other midi file, which sounds like your own :)

    cya
  3. dgamos

    dgamos New Member

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    Try using a basic pre-sampled loop and flavouur it with bits of your own, you'll soon be building qulity loops and the better you get the less you'll rely on pre sampled stuff although I like sampled loops.
  4. voice of god

    voice of god Prodigal Pyjamas Pervert Staff Member Super Mod

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    um, just listen very hard

    maybe start with 4 bars at a time

    try listening for the kick drum first, and put that into your midi

    then listen for the snare, put that in

    then the hi-hats

    can be a painstaking process, but the end result is rewarding

    most of the songs I sequence are just drums and bass maybe we could work together
  5. axeman

    axeman New Member

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    I take it section by section, and usually get the bass/snare combination down first and then fill it out with cymbals/toms afterwards. Once you have a visual on how the beat looks it's easy to fill it out.

    Plus, once you've got a section of a song done eg. verse, you can just plug that in for all the verses if you're not fussy. If you are, and the the verses are slightly different, then you can use your first verse as a template for creating the others.
  6. xtremidi

    xtremidi New Member

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    I have the same problem :-<.

    Dgamos: What do you mean use pre-sampled loops. Are these available on a midi program or can they be downloaded from the internet.

    Voice of god, you said to listen for the drum kick - is that the low loud beat. And what are hi-hats.
  7. sheffers

    sheffers New Member

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    voice of god is right on the mark. :thumbsup:

    Listening to one part at a time is the key.
    I start out by creating a road map of the song. Bar 1 is a blank bar up front (which might include a count off click). Later, I'll use this bar for program changes, controller changes and SysEx.
    Bar 2 is the the first bar I hear.
    Bar 10 might be the beginning of the verse.
    bar 34 might be the beginning of the chorus, etc.

    I actually create my "road map" on staff paper; it makes it easier for me to follow.

    Usually, my road map is linear, meaning I don't go back to bar 10 and label it 46 for the beginning of the second verse, even though the data may be the same. sometimes i'll have lyrics here and there to help me know where i am.

    when i'm done with the road map, i'll have any odd meter bars indicated. I then create a "click track" , including any odd measures, which is generally a tight shaker on eigth or quarter notes; i'll erase this by the time i'm done with the drums.
    Next, i program the kick, (one bar at a time, if necessary,) from begining to end. as i approach the end of the first chorus, i'll audit the kick drum pattern on verse 2 and chorus 2 and copy verse 1 and chorus 1, making any modifications needed.
    then the snare, then the hi hats, open and closed.
    Remember, one bar at a time. If your entering data realtime, make sure you understand the quantization proccess on your MIDI sequencing program.
    Once i'm done with the hats, i can generally eliminate my shaker "click track".

    Then, back to bar one and listen for the next percussive intrument i hear... is it a crash? or ride? or cowbell, or tom? whatever i choose next, i audit the rest of the tune for any occurence of that instrument.

    And so it goes until i'm finished.

    Then bass. then ...

    From there, the process is similar.

    When creating a MIDI sequence, it is good to remember that you are the "arranger, engineer and producer", even if you are copying a recorded performance, note for note (hopefully.)

    Some of things that make a sequence "pro", in my opinion, is the attention and time spent on detail, including the mix and dynamics.

    One other hurdle that is worth overcoming is learning a little music theory. You don't have learn everything, (although it would help tremendously) just learn the basics of Rythym: time signatures, note values, rest values, triplets, etc.

    I volunteer teach music to 3rd and 4th graders; these kids can read and clap out simple snycopated eigth note rythyms after one ten-minute lesson.

    This rudimentary knowledge would be invaluable to anyone dealing with sequencing and editing a drum track...

    :stick:Your persistance will be rewarded.

    Good Luck,
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2003
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