Electronic drums

Discussion in 'Percussion' started by dvdlei, Jul 8, 2002.

  1. dvdlei

    dvdlei New Member

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    I want to buy a electronic drumset for use in a band.

    Can you give me some advise about the different brands available?

    I was thinking of the Roland TD-10.. what do you know about this thing?
  2. tavenger5

    tavenger5 Mr Admin Guy Staff Member Admin

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    I can't remember what the TD-10 looks like. Is it the newer, cheaper one? I know I played an older TD-7 and it was great! :) I also played a newer v-drum set not that long ago. I guess it depends on how much you want to spend. the TD-7 is around $1500-$2000. And the v-drums can be up to $4500.

    The only other thing you have to worry about with electronic drums is amplification. Good thing about that is, if you're playing in a small club and you play hard, the level can be adjusted easily.
  3. lostdave

    lostdave 'EVIL' Mod

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    I recently Bought, mainly for sequencing use, a Roland SPD-20.
    i got sick of trying to play in drum tracks on my keyboard...
    Definitly makes for a more 'natural' feel on my sequencing.


    for those of you that may remember the octopad.......the SPD-20 is Very Similar..
    most happy with the sounds.
    In fact i have started using it as my main drum module...


    Dave
  4. strike

    strike New Member

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    I would consider the D-Drum it feels plyin real drum they have real drumheads. But remember to playin the electric drum is not the same as acoustic you have to have a good monitor system because you only get the sound from speakers and there is a little delay (Very little) but its enough to keep you out of beat, I play the D-drum in a little upbeat so it works allright with the band.
    Peter
  5. quad2004

    quad2004 New Member

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    I played my neighbor's V drums (yes, two neighbors that play drums ;) ) and he has the V-concert set. Those are the best electronic drums I've ever played. I said electric drums... I prefer the sound of acoustic but electric drums have a lot of benefits.
  6. The_Clique_KC

    The_Clique_KC New Member

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    Today's electronics are better than ever. Those of us that remember the old Simmons hard-as-a-rock-break-your-wrists kits will agree. The modules are also more expressive with velocity switching and choke cymbal features. All you really need to do is find the pads that feel good to you (thatz what SHE said).
  7. rounty

    rounty Guest

    Do those electronic drums really sound natural? I don't know, I've my "real" set and never played on a electronical one.

    But if you wanna play in a band I would prefer a non-electronical - they simply look better in my opinion.
  8. jejune

    jejune New Member

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    The DDRUM 3 wins hands down. Still, after almost 10 years. Position, Velocity (1000 levels vs. 128 in V-Drums or anything MIDI based) and PRESSURE (ie. you cand bend the pitch by pressing on the drum head) detection ON ALL TEN CHANNELS AT ONCE. Pricey, but if you're serious about creativity . . .
  9. vidpro1

    vidpro1 New Member

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    Yamaha Electronic Drums

    Hi,

    I'm new to this group. I own a Yamaha DTX Express II.
    For $1000 it does what need it to do.

    I has lots of usable sounds.

    VP1
  10. Emu

    Emu New Member

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    is there such thing as a "cheap" trigger to midi interface, I don't need a brain at all, I only need it hooked up to my computer
  11. nbaker45

    nbaker45 New Member

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    I have both an electronic kit (Roland V-Session) and an acoustic kit (Pearl). For gigging, I choose which will best fit the situation. typically, I'll always go for the acoustic kit if the gig is outdoors and I don't know the sound guys. There are really big differences in playability and feel, etc. But you have to decide why you're doing it...

    I love my acoustic kit because IT PLAYS... It feels like real drums because it is. It sounds great, and I will always use it for any recording that I do. You can't replace the natural sound of a real Snare and real Zildjians... but... ...

    My Electronic kit helps me change my sound with a push of a button, allows me to practice anywhere, and keeps my stage volume down to a reasonable level. With the V-Session, the feel is almost natural and the sampled sounds are really good. My electronics are irreplacable in an unpredictable gigging environment. I own, but do not haul around an amplification system - I let the sound guys handle that. I did invest in a good in-ear monitor system that works far better than the amplified system.

    I could write more, but this is already a novel...
  12. drums67

    drums67 New Member

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    I've been using the roland v-club series for quite sometime, the td-7 and 7 are easy to learn and navigate, the sounds are pretty good also. The sequencing feature is great for extra percussion parts. I use the mix in feature a lot when learning new songs, just hook up a CD player and go.

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