First time at GC (long)

Discussion in 'rec.music.percussion' started by Da Parrot-chick, Sep 1, 2003.

  1. I swear this is all true. It all happened in one visit.

    I bought a keyboard from a friend of mine to do some composing on, and
    started getting a few gigs on it. I figured I'd need at least a gig bag, a
    case would be better. I figure I'd give GC a chance, even though the store
    is like 20 miles from my house.

    I find it and walk in. First off I can't tell who works there; the sales
    staff looks just like the customers. That's no problem but there's nothing
    to distinguish them: no badge, name tag, t-shirt, feathered beanie, nothing.
    Okay, I figure they'll recognize a new customer and approach me. Fresh
    fish, ready to gorge on any bait they put out there.

    Ha. First clam. The folks behind the counter glance up, frown, and go back
    to their paperwork. I wander around for five minutes and not a single
    person says hello or can I help you or even hiyadoon. That's their
    greeting: a frown and then use the invisible ray gun on me.

    I finally find the keyboard room; it's deserted but for two guys sitting in
    a chair shooting the breeze. I give them a nod; they glance over and then
    ignore me. Okay. I turn away and see case that looks perfect, but it's
    behind some other gear. I reach for it and just as I put my hand on the
    handle, I hear a stern voice call out, "Hey put that down!"

    Ha. Second clam. I turn around and the two guys are laughing at my startled
    look. I ask them what's going on, I'm just checking out this case and one
    guy says, "That's my case and it's not for sale. I did a demo of new gear
    an hour ago." Turns out it's the factory rep and the keyboard department
    manager. They laugh some more while the manager says that the cases are on
    the other side of the store. How's that for persuasive sales technique? I
    put the case down on the floor and walk out of the room while the two guys
    continue their breeze-shooting. This is how they treat new customers?

    On my way to the keyboard room I see a woman who's a dish. Charm for days.
    She comes from around the counter so I know she works there. The Dish gives
    me a smile, asks if I need any help. I decide to see how her department,
    guitar accessories, works. I tell her I'm looking for a guitar stand (I was
    at the time). She shows me a couple, then says, "If you need any help I'm
    right here." The Dish gets a coupla points.

    I wind my way past the bass guitar rack and see some high-end gear. Since
    I'm a bassist too, I decide to see how the bass department holds up. I
    stare at one bass (a Warwick Thumb; Benj knows how good these axes are--Jack
    Bruce and Paul McCartney both have one; I think Robert Trujillo had one for
    a minuet too) for about three minutes before a guy approaches me and asks if
    I want help. I tell him I'm interested in this bass and I'd like to try it
    out.

    Ha. Third clam. He says sure but he's never liked them because they sound
    too woody. That'll sell a bass every time--diss the product before the
    customer can even say what he's looking for. I ask if I could try it out
    and he hooks me up. I play for about 30 seconds and love it but don't let
    on. He stands there, silent, keeping the carpet from floating up in the
    air. I finally hand it back and thank him (no response from him).

    I finally make it back to the cases and see Joe No-Gig-Tonight Neckbone
    working the counter. He doesn't greet me either, but he does greet the two
    teenage chickies who follow me in. Every sentence they utter is a great
    witticism or deep thought to him and he's as gracious as a prince. They
    don't buy anything, just giggle, ask some questions, and split. I've been
    in the room for about five minutes, maybe more, and no one has approached
    me. Joe Neckbone finally walks up and asks if I need help. By this time I
    find a gig bag and express interest. He mumbles some monosyllables in
    response, until I ask the price. Then he springs to life.

    Ha. Clam number four. "$40, man." I swear, Dale Carnegie must be bound
    and gagged in the store room. They musta bought up all the available copies
    of his "How to Win Friends & Influence People" and burned them in the
    boiler. Anyway, my budget is $50 for a bag and $100 for a case, but I try
    and lower the price (as a matter of principle): "I'll give you $30." "No,
    that's as low as I can go. I could give you $35 on a used case or a
    blemished case, but that one's brand new." I cock an eyebrow: "Oh really?"
    Then I put the bag on the counter, unzip the pocket, and pull out a sales
    slip. The case was a return from two weeks hence and the zipper stuck
    closing it up. The stitching was single-stitch--cheap. I leave the slip
    and the bag on the counter and break without saying goodbye but not before
    giving him some stink face for his limp attempt at oily talk. Joe
    Wish-I-Had-A Gig Neckbone just stands there staring at me while keeping the
    carpet from rolling up.

    I've had it and am heading for the door. But I'm cool. The Dish is talking
    to some customers but interrupts herself to say, "Thanks for coming in," and
    I favor her with a nod. She was the only pleasant part of my visit. I hop
    in the battleship, pull out of the parking lot, and vow never to return.

    Last chapter: I head downtown to a store I've been patronizing since they
    opened in the 1970s; I was one of their first customers. The owner
    recognizes me as I walk in and greets me, asking me how can he help. I tell
    him I need a gig bag and he says, "New or used?" " I ask what he's got and
    he grabs a perfectly new-looking bag off a shelf and says it's mine for $15
    because part of the lining inside is ripped but he assures me it's fine.
    Gives me a 6' cable out of the bargain bucket. No extra charge.

    The only way I'm ever going into a Guitar Center store anywhere ever again
    is if the place is on fire and I'm helping pull people out.
  2. Sean Conolly

    Sean Conolly Guest

    "Da Parrot-chick" <just@sk.me> wrote in message
    news:M0E4b.4474$tw6.948@newsread4.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    > I swear this is all true. It all happened in one visit.


    My local GC actually has a good manager who does try to establish a
    relationship with the customer and goes out of his way to help repeat
    customers. In turn he's managed to build a decent staff, they're not all
    good but there's a least one person in each deprtment who is knowledgable
    and helpful. They have two good guys in the drum room, so usually when I go
    in I don't get jerked around.

    However, a lot of times I'm not looking for a specific item, I'm just
    checking for what's cheap or on clearance. Last time I was in I saw a new
    six piece Pearl Export shell pack w/ snare for $425. That's not bad for an
    above average entry level kit IMHO.

    Sean
  3. Da Parrot-chick <just@sk.me> wrote:
    > I swear this is all true. It all happened in one visit.


    <snip truly fine GC loss of virginity story>

    Been there. Done that.
    It sounds all too familiar.

    However, don't sell GC short. You can't judge on just
    one visit. You just have to hit them just right.

    Example: SA has one of their weekly "huge" sales.
    One special item are these hard (formed plastic with
    aluminum trim and bracing) bass and guitar cases.
    Yeah they are China clones, but still VERY nice
    and like $20. I buy two. Compare to the usual brands
    costing like hundred each.

    Example: GC has weekly "huge" sale. I find giant
    3-way LP conga stand. It's a demo model. $70. Totally
    like new. Sells for $170 at interstate (weighs a TON
    so shipping will cost a fortune), and CPP wants over
    $200. Also find demo LP "torpedo" $15. Normal price
    (Interstate) $61 plus shipping.

    I mean it's no wonder my house is overflowing with
    crap!

    But as for the worthless staff, it's clear all they
    really need is some "real" management to put a boot
    to their collective butts. Which is why we need to
    keep whining here about them. Hopefully someone
    high enough up at SA/GC is lurking and takes the hint.

    Benj
  4. -MIKE-

    -MIKE- Guest

    "Da Parrot-chick" <just@sk.me> wrote:

    > The only way I'm ever going into a Guitar Center store anywhere ever again
    > is if the place is on fire and I'm helping pull people out.
    >



    Sig, up for grabs!


    -MIKE-

    --
    http://mikedrums.com
    mike@mikedrumsDOT.com
    ---remove "DOT" ^^^^ to reply
  5. -MIKE-

    -MIKE- Guest

    "Sean Conolly" <sjconolly_98@yaaho.com> wrote:

    > My local GC actually has a good manager who does try to establish a
    > relationship with the customer and goes out of his way to help repeat
    > customers. In turn he's managed to build a decent staff, they're not all
    > good but there's a least one person in each deprtment who is knowledgable
    > and helpful. They have two good guys in the drum room, so usually when I
    > go in I don't get jerked around.



    I've seen great, consciences, respectful staff at mega-chains, too.
    But what I've noticed is, they never seem to last long. I'm
    guessing they quit because they refuse to buy into, and become
    infested with, the corporate mentality that the upper management
    forces on these guys.


    -MIKE-

    --
    http://mikedrums.com
    mike@mikedrumsDOT.com
    ---remove "DOT" ^^^^ to reply
  6. <bjacoby@users.iwaynet.net> wrote in message
    news:bivrfq$52f$1@tribune.oar.net...
    > Da Parrot-chick <just@sk.me> wrote:
    > > I swear this is all true. It all happened in one visit.

    >
    > <snip truly fine GC loss of virginity story>
    >
    > Been there. Done that.
    > It sounds all too familiar.
    >
    > However, don't sell GC short. You can't judge on just
    > one visit. You just have to hit them just right.


    They had several chances. Five, in the one visit. Only one person in the
    store, the Dish, had any customer service skills at all. Would you go back
    to a business where you had four poor interactions with the staff, or would
    you go to a place that actually welcomed your visit and let you know?

    > Example: SA has one of their weekly "huge" sales.
    > One special item are these hard (formed plastic with
    > aluminum trim and bracing) bass and guitar cases.
    > Yeah they are China clones, but still VERY nice
    > and like $20. I buy two. Compare to the usual brands
    > costing like hundred each.
    >
    > Example: GC has weekly "huge" sale. I find giant
    > 3-way LP conga stand. It's a demo model. $70. Totally
    > like new. Sells for $170 at interstate (weighs a TON
    > so shipping will cost a fortune), and CPP wants over
    > $200. Also find demo LP "torpedo" $15. Normal price
    > (Interstate) $61 plus shipping.
    >
    > I mean it's no wonder my house is overflowing with
    > crap!


    All good points, Benj. Thing is, I'm willing to pay more if it means I get
    better service. And I let the stores know it too.

    > But as for the worthless staff, it's clear all they
    > really need is some "real" management to put a boot
    > to their collective butts. Which is why we need to
    > keep whining here about them. Hopefully someone
    > high enough up at SA/GC is lurking and takes the hint.


    I hope they actually find WMDs in Iraq, too. But I doubt either will
    happen.
  7. Adam

    Adam Guest

    -MIKE- (mike@mikedrumsDOT.com) wrote:

    > "Sean Conolly" <sjconolly_98@yaaho.com> wrote:
    >
    >> My local GC actually has a good manager who does try to
    >> establish a relationship with the customer and goes out of
    >> his way to help repeat customers. In turn he's managed to
    >> build a decent staff, they're not all good but there's a
    >> least one person in each deprtment who is knowledgable and
    >> helpful. They have two good guys in the drum room, so usually
    >> when I go in I don't get jerked around.

    >
    >
    > I've seen great, consciences, respectful staff at mega-chains,
    > too. But what I've noticed is, they never seem to last long.
    > I'm guessing they quit because they refuse to buy into, and
    > become infested with, the corporate mentality that the upper
    > management forces on these guys.


    I have had jobs with four different companies, two large national
    or multinational, and two small and local. Of the two large
    companies I lasted 5 weeks at burger king (summer job - I could
    have stayed through term but I hated it) and about 6 months at
    Safeways (another summer job. I could have transferred when I
    moved away to university, but didnt because I hated it). Of the
    two small companies I lasted a year at my first restaurant, where
    despite doing an incredibly scummy job (Kitchen Porter) for
    rubbish pay, there was a real team spirit, good benefits, and a
    friendly working environment. I only left because I had taken on
    extra playing and I just didnt have the time. The other, where I
    still work, started as a casual job over easter last year. I
    enjoyed it so much that I have kept going back on a casual basis,
    working occasional hours during term, and full time during
    holidays.
    I'm sure I'm not the only one who has found that smaller more
    local companies are just nicer places to work. In both small
    companies I feel like part of the team, a valued member of staff,
    whereas with the larger companies I get the feeling that head
    office say they need X people on each shift, and that all the
    employees are there to make up numbers. So its not surprising
    that the service from larger companies feels impersonal, because
    it is. Ignore the name badges, as far as management are concerned
    base-rate staff are just numbers and are treated as such.
    Of course there are exceptions, and no doubt there are some
    really good managers out there working for large chains who make
    the employees feel valued and create a good team spirit, but IME
    they are few and far between.
    Anyway, thats just my 2 generic currency units worth.

    --
    <INSERT SIG HERE>
  8. TJ Hertz

    TJ Hertz Guest

    Adam wrote:
    > -MIKE- (mike@mikedrumsDOT.com) wrote:
    >
    >> "Sean Conolly" <sjconolly_98@yaaho.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> My local GC actually has a good manager who does try to
    >>> establish a relationship with the customer and goes out of
    >>> his way to help repeat customers. In turn he's managed to
    >>> build a decent staff, they're not all good but there's a
    >>> least one person in each deprtment who is knowledgable and
    >>> helpful. They have two good guys in the drum room, so usually
    >>> when I go in I don't get jerked around.

    >>
    >>
    >> I've seen great, consciences, respectful staff at mega-chains,
    >> too. But what I've noticed is, they never seem to last long.
    >> I'm guessing they quit because they refuse to buy into, and
    >> become infested with, the corporate mentality that the upper
    >> management forces on these guys.

    >
    > I have had jobs with four different companies, two large national
    > or multinational, and two small and local. Of the two large
    > companies I lasted 5 weeks at burger king (summer job - I could
    > have stayed through term but I hated it) and about 6 months at
    > Safeways (another summer job. I could have transferred when I
    > moved away to university, but didnt because I hated it). Of the
    > two small companies I lasted a year at my first restaurant, where
    > despite doing an incredibly scummy job (Kitchen Porter) for
    > rubbish pay, there was a real team spirit, good benefits, and a
    > friendly working environment. I only left because I had taken on
    > extra playing and I just didnt have the time. The other, where I
    > still work, started as a casual job over easter last year. I
    > enjoyed it so much that I have kept going back on a casual basis,
    > working occasional hours during term, and full time during
    > holidays.
    > I'm sure I'm not the only one who has found that smaller more
    > local companies are just nicer places to work. In both small
    > companies I feel like part of the team, a valued member of staff,
    > whereas with the larger companies I get the feeling that head
    > office say they need X people on each shift, and that all the
    > employees are there to make up numbers. So its not surprising
    > that the service from larger companies feels impersonal, because
    > it is. Ignore the name badges, as far as management are concerned
    > base-rate staff are just numbers and are treated as such.
    > Of course there are exceptions, and no doubt there are some
    > really good managers out there working for large chains who make
    > the employees feel valued and create a good team spirit, but IME
    > they are few and far between.
    > Anyway, thats just my 2 generic currency units worth.


    The staff at my local Burger King are utterly incompetant and obnoxious...
    they make no effort to help customers, be nice, be quick. McDonalds is only
    slightly better. These places would get so much more business (they have
    mine, but only for convenience value if there's nowhere else open) if they
    properly trained their staff.

    I started working for a major chain clothes shop the other week. This
    company is one of those big worldwide giants but really have their shit
    together with regards to customer service and training... paying attention
    to details, both with staff and merchandise (which I wouldn't usually wear,
    but can't deny it's good stuff). All four managers are great people, the
    staff are happy, the pay is good. Goes to show that at least some large
    corporations recognise the importance of their employees.

    Back on topic, I guess the UK is lucky in that almost all the music shops
    are individually owned. Maybe not mom-and-pop, but the shops are small
    enough to hire and take care of fairly decent staff - some not as good as
    others, but none as bad as the GC experiences I've read about.

    --
    TJ Hertz
    http://www.whatyourenot.com
  9. Joey Furr

    Joey Furr Guest

    Our GC is managed well also. Some may remember my stories about GC giving me
    free stuff becuase they didn't have what I needed when I needed it.

    --

    ....Joey
    "...so hold the mustard on those flames, y'all." - Aaron Draper

    "Sean Conolly" <sjconolly_98@yaaho.com> wrote in message
    news:ShJ4b.4380$UF.369@bignews2.bellsouth.net...
    > "Da Parrot-chick" <just@sk.me> wrote in message
    > news:M0E4b.4474$tw6.948@newsread4.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    > > I swear this is all true. It all happened in one visit.

    >
    > My local GC actually has a good manager who does try to establish a
    > relationship with the customer and goes out of his way to help repeat
    > customers. In turn he's managed to build a decent staff, they're not all
    > good but there's a least one person in each deprtment who is knowledgable
    > and helpful. They have two good guys in the drum room, so usually when I

    go
    > in I don't get jerked around.
    >
    > However, a lot of times I'm not looking for a specific item, I'm just
    > checking for what's cheap or on clearance. Last time I was in I saw a new
    > six piece Pearl Export shell pack w/ snare for $425. That's not bad for an
    > above average entry level kit IMHO.
    >
    > Sean
    >
    >
    >
  10. Dan Radin

    Dan Radin Guest

    "Joey Furr" <joeyfurr@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:Ubedncum-pJ1Ns6iU-KYgw@comcast.com...
    > Our GC is managed well also. Some may remember my stories about GC giving

    me
    > free stuff becuase they didn't have what I needed when I needed it.


    <soapbox>
    Those places (big boxes) are not set up to allow the "free throw-in" unless
    you're really there for a while and figure out what works and doesn't. Most
    good salespeople know that you have to throw in some sticks and drumkeys
    with a kid's first drumkit purchase, but management may not understand that,
    so a good salesperson has a cache of potential throw-ins. At my store, we
    had an entire aisle in the basement of stick seconds, parts, stands, throne
    tops, broken pedals, cymbals felts, free videos, etc. We also were one of
    the top drum departments in the Sam Ash chain because, as Mike said, the
    management was adequate, the GM was excellent, and the department manager
    and "elderstatesmen" sales staff knew their stuff and how to teach it to the
    new guys even if they only made it a week or two.

    As somebody else said in this thread, you indeed make you commission on the
    profit dollars, not the total sale dollars, so you may make more on a $20
    cable than on a $1k Roland synth. But what most kids forget is that being
    successful in music retail is all about the relationships and word of mouth.
    If you treat a customer right the first time, he'll hopefully come back and
    tell his buddies to come see you. You can't think in terms of the single
    sale in front of you, but most people get into music retail as a part time
    or short term thing, and that's why they fail, as evidenced by the 90% of
    music retail employees today. Why do you think I do most of my business with
    Mark Turner and George Lawrence, rather than Jack's Drum Shop, which is five
    minutes from me? I have no problems with Jack's; I like Greg and Ken, but
    Mark and George go the extra mile for me every time. They treat their
    customers right.
    </soap box>
  11. Glenn Dowdy

    Glenn Dowdy Guest

    "-MIKE-" <mike@mikedrumsDOT.com> wrote in message
    news:YeydnYKia8TcH86iXTWJig@comcast.com...
    >
    >
    > I've seen great, consciences, respectful staff at mega-chains, too.
    > But what I've noticed is, they never seem to last long. I'm
    > guessing they quit because they refuse to buy into, and become
    > infested with, the corporate mentality that the upper management
    > forces on these guys.
    >

    What corporate mentality is this? Most corporations like to make money over
    the long run with repeat customers. What you're talking about is bad
    management, period. Was Mars that different?

    Glenn D.
  12. -MIKE-

    -MIKE- Guest

    >>
    >> I've seen great, consciences, respectful staff at mega-chains, too.
    >> But what I've noticed is, they never seem to last long. I'm
    >> guessing they quit because they refuse to buy into, and become
    >> infested with, the corporate mentality that the upper management
    >> forces on these guys.
    >>

    > What corporate mentality is this? Most corporations like to make money
    > over the long run with repeat customers. What you're talking about is bad
    > management, period. Was Mars that different?
    >
    > Glenn D.
    >
    >


    My conscientious misspelling aside :), I'm talking about
    management pushing policy over people. It's hard for sales staff to
    get personal and establish repeat customers, when the corporation
    sees numbers, numbers, numbers, not names and faces. When you want
    to try out a pair of sticks on a cymbal or try a cymbal on a kit,
    and they don't let you, because "it's policy," that doesn't generate
    sales.

    Real life example: For a reason I still can't comprehend, I'm not
    allowed to take *my own sticks* into the store! I want to spend
    money at the store, but I can't bring my own sticks in. I ask for a
    reason. Answer: "It's the policy." I said that I understood it is
    the policy, but could they explain the reason behind the policy.
    "It's just policy."

    Well, it's my policy to take this wad of cash over to some other
    place that doesn't have its collective head up its collective
    crapper. :)


    -MIKE-

    --
    http://mikedrums.com
    mike@mikedrumsDOT.com
    ---remove "DOT" ^^^^ to reply
  13. Thank you, Dan, and it's nice to have friendly competition like Mark at K&S.

    --
    George Lawrence
    George's Drum Shop
    1351 S. Cleveland-Massillon Road #21
    Copley, Ohio 44321
    http://www.GeorgesDrumShop.com
    http://www.Drumguru.com
    330 670 0800
    toll free 866 970 0800

    "If thine enemy wrong thee,
    buy each of his children a drum."
    -Chinese proverb




    "Dan Radin" <dan.radin@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:HAO4b.16219$NC2.2999@nwrdny01.gnilink.net...
    > "Joey Furr" <joeyfurr@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:Ubedncum-pJ1Ns6iU-KYgw@comcast.com...
    > > Our GC is managed well also. Some may remember my stories about GC

    giving
    > me
    > > free stuff becuase they didn't have what I needed when I needed it.

    >
    > <soapbox>
    > Those places (big boxes) are not set up to allow the "free throw-in"

    unless
    > you're really there for a while and figure out what works and doesn't.

    Most
    > good salespeople know that you have to throw in some sticks and drumkeys
    > with a kid's first drumkit purchase, but management may not understand

    that,
    > so a good salesperson has a cache of potential throw-ins. At my store, we
    > had an entire aisle in the basement of stick seconds, parts, stands,

    throne
    > tops, broken pedals, cymbals felts, free videos, etc. We also were one of
    > the top drum departments in the Sam Ash chain because, as Mike said, the
    > management was adequate, the GM was excellent, and the department manager
    > and "elderstatesmen" sales staff knew their stuff and how to teach it to

    the
    > new guys even if they only made it a week or two.
    >
    > As somebody else said in this thread, you indeed make you commission on

    the
    > profit dollars, not the total sale dollars, so you may make more on a $20
    > cable than on a $1k Roland synth. But what most kids forget is that being
    > successful in music retail is all about the relationships and word of

    mouth.
    > If you treat a customer right the first time, he'll hopefully come back

    and
    > tell his buddies to come see you. You can't think in terms of the single
    > sale in front of you, but most people get into music retail as a part time
    > or short term thing, and that's why they fail, as evidenced by the 90% of
    > music retail employees today. Why do you think I do most of my business

    with
    > Mark Turner and George Lawrence, rather than Jack's Drum Shop, which is

    five
    > minutes from me? I have no problems with Jack's; I like Greg and Ken, but
    > Mark and George go the extra mile for me every time. They treat their
    > customers right.
    > </soap box>
    >
    >
  14. NoSheeples

    NoSheeples Guest

    >They had several chances. Five, in the one visit. Only one person in the
    >store, the Dish, had any customer service skills at all. Would you go back
    >to a business where you had four poor interactions with the staff, or would
    >you go to a place that actually welcomed your visit and let you know?
    >
    >> Example: SA has one of their weekly "huge" sales.
    >> One special item are these hard (formed plastic with
    >> aluminum trim and bracing) bass and guitar cases.
    >> Yeah they are China clones, but still VERY nice
    >> and like $20. I buy two. Compare to the usual brands
    >> costing like hundred each.
    >>
    >> Example: GC has weekly "huge" sale. I find giant
    >> 3-way LP conga stand. It's a demo model. $70. Totally
    >> like new. Sells for $170 at interstate (weighs a TON
    >> so shipping will cost a fortune), and CPP wants over
    >> $200. Also find demo LP "torpedo" $15. Normal price
    >> (Interstate) $61 plus shipping.
    >>
    >> I mean it's no wonder my house is overflowing with
    >> crap!

    >
    >All good points, Benj. Thing is, I'm willing to pay more if it means I get
    >better service. And I let the stores know it too.
    >
    >> But as for the worthless staff, it's clear all they
    >> really need is some "real" management to put a boot
    >> to their collective butts. Which is why we need to
    >> keep whining here about them. Hopefully someone
    >> high enough up at SA/GC is lurking and takes the hint.

    >
    >I hope they actually find WMDs in Iraq, too. But I doubt either will
    >happen.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >


    It's not the companys fault per say. Home depot is the same way, there are 2
    stores 20 miles apart here, and they are total contrast to each other. It has
    to do with 2 things, management, and the quality of help available. If the
    store happens to be in a town full of ghetto druggies, then guess what? That's
    what your going to get.

    Stores sometimes have no choice. Stick with the shit help they have or not be
    there at all. Sometimes there is just not a lot of good help to choose from. I
    went through this crap when I managed a Dairy procceseing plant. The town it
    was in was horrible,
    Forget it man. 9 out of ten could not even do the job let alone show up for
    work.
    The options were, close the plant or deal with the Bull shit. Sometimes it is
    the stores fault, and sometimes it's not.
    These things will self correct. There is a local music store here who's name I
    won't mention, but after years of being the GC guess what? They lost 50% of
    their customer base, and are on the way out.
    Same thing will happen with GC. Some other music store will offer better
    service and that will be the end of GC, at least in that area.



    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what is for lunch. Liberty is
    a well armed lamb protesting the vote."
  15. riddim

    riddim Guest

    The Baltimore and Gaithersburg MD GCs don't seem to have quite the high
    cretin/customer ratio. They must have some adult supervision.
  16. riddim

    riddim Guest

    The Baltimore and Gaithersburg MD GCs don't seem to have quite the same high
    cretin/customer ratio as some of the stores I hear horror stories about.
    They must have some adult supervision.

    I would suggest that those of us who have issues with the lack of counter
    help be make sure to stop by the manager's office on the way out and share
    their feelings with him or her. If you don't get taken care of, send an
    e-mail to the regional or national office.
  17. Robert Schuh

    Robert Schuh Guest

    Da Parrot-chick wrote:

    > I swear this is all true. It all happened in one visit.
    >
    > I bought a keyboard from a friend of mine to do some composing on, and
    > started getting a few gigs on it. I figured I'd need at least a gig bag, a
    > case would be better. I figure I'd give GC a chance, even though the store
    > is like 20 miles from my house.
    >
    > I find it and walk in. First off I can't tell who works there; the sales
    > staff looks just like the customers. That's no problem but there's nothing
    > to distinguish them: no badge, name tag, t-shirt, feathered beanie, nothing.
    > Okay, I figure they'll recognize a new customer and approach me. Fresh
    > fish, ready to gorge on any bait they put out there.
    >
    > Ha. First clam. The folks behind the counter glance up, frown, and go back
    > to their paperwork. I wander around for five minutes and not a single
    > person says hello or can I help you or even hiyadoon. That's their
    > greeting: a frown and then use the invisible ray gun on me.
    >
    > I finally find the keyboard room; it's deserted but for two guys sitting in
    > a chair shooting the breeze. I give them a nod; they glance over and then
    > ignore me. Okay. I turn away and see case that looks perfect, but it's
    > behind some other gear. I reach for it and just as I put my hand on the
    > handle, I hear a stern voice call out, "Hey put that down!"
    >
    > Ha. Second clam. I turn around and the two guys are laughing at my startled
    > look. I ask them what's going on, I'm just checking out this case and one
    > guy says, "That's my case and it's not for sale. I did a demo of new gear
    > an hour ago." Turns out it's the factory rep and the keyboard department
    > manager. They laugh some more while the manager says that the cases are on
    > the other side of the store. How's that for persuasive sales technique? I
    > put the case down on the floor and walk out of the room while the two guys
    > continue their breeze-shooting. This is how they treat new customers?
    >
    > On my way to the keyboard room I see a woman who's a dish. Charm for days.
    > She comes from around the counter so I know she works there. The Dish gives
    > me a smile, asks if I need any help. I decide to see how her department,
    > guitar accessories, works. I tell her I'm looking for a guitar stand (I was
    > at the time). She shows me a couple, then says, "If you need any help I'm
    > right here." The Dish gets a coupla points.


    Now Skip,
    We all realize that you think it is hip to be a homophobe, but I take it you
    also think it is cool to be a misogynist? "The Dish?" How would you like it if
    you were on a gig and some dolt referred to you as "The Moolie?" Why do you keep
    posting in a drumming newsgroup anyway?



    --
    Robert Schuh
    "Everything that elevates an individual above the herd and
    intimidates the neighbour is henceforth called evil; and
    the fair, modest, submissive and conforming mentality,
    the mediocrity of desires attains moral designations and honors"
    - Nietzsche

    "The meek shall inherit nothing" - Zappa
  18. Hello everyone I'm somewhat new to the group but thought I would share my 2
    recent experiences with GC.

    The first I went to GC and since I am just getting back into drumming I
    pretty much was just looking around and picking up a few misc things and
    some heads.It took forever for someone to help me and then the guy behind
    the counter who got my heads gave them to me to look at and
    disappeared.Finally the other guy in the department (who was busy selling a
    set when I got there so I can't blame him) had to ring me up.This was after
    15 min of sitting at the counter.Needless to say I was pissed off.

    Now my second time was much better.This time I decided to go to a different
    GC since there are 2 near me that are about the same distance.I soon as I
    got in the drum room I had some one there to help me.I was there to pick up
    a pair of high hats and was on a somewhat limited budget.I didn't want to
    spend too much but I wanted high hats I liked,not some cheap ZBT's or
    anything like that.I told this to the salesperson and he gave some sticks
    and told me to go play around and tell him what pair I liked and he would
    see what he could do.He even came by and was playing on some so I could
    listen.I walked out of the store with a new set of 14" A New Beat high hats
    for $170.These list for $380 and the sale price at Musician's Friend and
    every other website is $224.99.Definatly a MUCH better experience.Needless
    to say next time I need to buy something I will be going back and looking
    for the same guy just because he hooked me up and he deserves the commision.

    My point is I had two different experences because I dealt with two
    different salespeople.Find someone who knows the instrumet and is good at
    sales and stick with them.It doesn't matter if its at GC, SA or whatever
    your local store happens to be.If you don't like the service or the sales
    staff just don't go there.If enough people do that they will get their act
    together or go broke.

    Neal

    "Dan Radin" <dan.radin@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:HAO4b.16219$NC2.2999@nwrdny01.gnilink.net...
    > "Joey Furr" <joeyfurr@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:Ubedncum-pJ1Ns6iU-KYgw@comcast.com...
    > > Our GC is managed well also. Some may remember my stories about GC

    giving
    > me
    > > free stuff becuase they didn't have what I needed when I needed it.

    >
    > <soapbox>
    > Those places (big boxes) are not set up to allow the "free throw-in"

    unless
    > you're really there for a while and figure out what works and doesn't.

    Most
    > good salespeople know that you have to throw in some sticks and drumkeys
    > with a kid's first drumkit purchase, but management may not understand

    that,
    > so a good salesperson has a cache of potential throw-ins. At my store, we
    > had an entire aisle in the basement of stick seconds, parts, stands,

    throne
    > tops, broken pedals, cymbals felts, free videos, etc. We also were one of
    > the top drum departments in the Sam Ash chain because, as Mike said, the
    > management was adequate, the GM was excellent, and the department manager
    > and "elderstatesmen" sales staff knew their stuff and how to teach it to

    the
    > new guys even if they only made it a week or two.
    >
    > As somebody else said in this thread, you indeed make you commission on

    the
    > profit dollars, not the total sale dollars, so you may make more on a $20
    > cable than on a $1k Roland synth. But what most kids forget is that being
    > successful in music retail is all about the relationships and word of

    mouth.
    > If you treat a customer right the first time, he'll hopefully come back

    and
    > tell his buddies to come see you. You can't think in terms of the single
    > sale in front of you, but most people get into music retail as a part time
    > or short term thing, and that's why they fail, as evidenced by the 90% of
    > music retail employees today. Why do you think I do most of my business

    with
    > Mark Turner and George Lawrence, rather than Jack's Drum Shop, which is

    five
    > minutes from me? I have no problems with Jack's; I like Greg and Ken, but
    > Mark and George go the extra mile for me every time. They treat their
    > customers right.
    > </soap box>
    >
    >
  19. "Robert Schuh" <rob@robschuh.com> wrote in message
    news:3F54325C.6A09EE18@robschuh.com...
    > Da Parrot-chick wrote:


    > Now Skip,
    > We all realize that you think it is hip to be a homophobe, but I take it

    you
    > also think it is cool to be a misogynist? "The Dish?" How would you like

    it if
    > you were on a gig and some dolt referred to you as "The Moolie?"


    Lookit who's lecturing me on ettiquite and being PC!! What the hell!

    Why do you keep
    > posting in a drumming newsgroup anyway?


    I was going to ask you the same thing, but then I remembered everybody needs
    a hobby. Whatever keeps you away from the kit, eh Schuh?
  20. Neal Fejedelem <nfejedelem@comcast.net> wrote:
    > Hello everyone I'm somewhat new to the group but thought I would share my 2
    > recent experiences with GC.


    Of course I'm not new to the group, but I will relate my latest
    GC story.

    GC had this "huge" labor day sale and I decide to go check it out.
    They had some pretty nice sale prices on things I didn't need,
    but of course the thing that interested me the most was the
    drum room bargain table. Had some Grover cable snares for $10
    and I'd have bought all they had if they were 13" but they
    were 14". Had VF brushes dirt cheap, but they were the non-folding
    kind. Feh. And so it went. But then I notice this "junk box"
    there full of all kinds of feet, hardware and beaters. But no price
    listed anywhere. Well of course there is a huge line of people
    milling around waiting to buy stuff and I can't get a question
    in edgewise. And finally when I just bull up to the counter
    to ask. Nobody has any idea. Eventually, however, I do find out
    the price is $4 per item no matter what it is! Interesting.
    I can buy a $4 tension rod or $4 stand foot! Don't think so.

    But what I do like is there is a pair of slightly used DW 2-way
    demo beaters (which I always use and needed more) and this Yamaha
    clamp that you can clamp things to cymbal stand with etc.
    All these things are a super buy at $4 each. So I try to buy.
    Well, some family is buying the kid a drumset and it has the
    whole drum dept tied. up. Eventually a guitar guy comes through
    sees me there and takes me to the guitar dept to check out.
    So far so good. I figure I'm about to be another GC happy camper.

    So I check out. The guy tells me my reciept will be at the door
    when I leave. I wander the store a bit more and try to leave.
    No dice!; No receipt. My purchase is NOT even in the computer.
    Gigantic conference ensues. They try this and that. They call
    this guy over and that guy over. I point out that Visa had no
    problem with the charge that they just phoned in on my card!
    Naturally because of our discussions here, I'm feeling frisky
    so I start telling them that they need to get this going because
    they are cutting into my Sam Ash time! They then threaten to NEVER
    let me out of the store! :)

    So finally the manager comes over fiddles with the computer some
    and in the end gives up, hands me the bag and says "have a nice day".
    So this wasn't a total horrible experience and I guess since a
    computer was involved it wasn't totally their fault. And I ended
    up with a super buy on stuff I really needed. But still, I DID
    have to work for it!

    Benj

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