Getting closer to the kit.

Discussion in 'rec.music.percussion' started by Richard H. Blount, Aug 14, 2003.

  1. Lacreta <lacreta8@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > I just wanted to add how great it is to see supportive in-put from
    > the group. And now I'm interested in the drum frame too. I have
    > really short legs, (I'm a 5'2" woman btw) and getting to each and
    > every drum, cymbal, cow bell, or whatever is rather interesting for
    > me. I hate it when my husband, (a guitar player) moves anything,,,


    AS a drumframe owner let me say a couple of things about it. I
    think the thing is simply wonderful whether or not a person has
    medical difficulties or not. The tilt back position is extremely
    comfortable and greatly reduces the "falling forward" problem that
    double bass players have from not having a stabilizing foot on the
    hat pedal. And there have been reports from Gatzen and others that
    the DrumFrame has for people with medical problems of various
    sorts been the difference between playing and not playing or playing
    for minutes and playing for hours.

    That is the plus side. But there is also a down side. First off
    it's a Rack system. So that means the thing is heavy. And Since
    the Drumframe includes a tilt back throne and riser it even more
    heavy. Now mind you it is NOT heavier than the gear a drummer might
    use that has a rack, large throne, and riser with his rig! But
    is bulkier and heavier than a few stands and a light throne.
    This turns some people off to it. Hey, it turns ME off to it!
    And by that I mean that now, I only use the Drumframe out when
    I'm getting paid to haul it. For freebies, jam sessions, charity
    events etc. I take the reduced kit which is just a few drums,
    tom-bass, and a couple of stands. But the Frame almost always set
    up for practice. And if I don't have to schlep it simply CANNOT
    be beat!

    As for your case, let me tell you how I did it with my drumframe.
    It's kind of a matter of how you think. Most drummers (including
    me in pre-drumframe days) set up the kit by opening the stands,
    sitting them on what ever open spaces on the floor they can
    find and maybe jockey them around a bit to get some "optimum"
    fit. If they need a cowbell they look around and say "hey,
    theres an open spot on the bass drum hoop, I'll clamp one
    there.

    I respectfully submit that this thinking is ass-backwards! What you
    need to do is plop your butt on the throne (or in my case drumframe
    chair) and then start evaluating exactly WHERE you'd like each item
    to be in front of you. Snare, hat, cymbals, pedals, toms, bells,
    whatever. Then having figured out where you'd like the item to
    be located THEN you figure out how to mount it in THAT spot. Whatever
    kind of rods, clamps, supports, you have to buy/build you DO it!
    And then finally, you MEMORY LOCK all that gear so each thing
    ALWAYS goes into that exact spot every time you set up. Even
    my pedals have pins so they go on the velcro EXACTLY the same
    way EVERY time! Let me tell you THIS is HEAVEN! Your drumset finally
    begins to feel like you are playing an INSTRUMENT rather than some
    collection of crap! This is one thing the DrumFrame did for me
    and I found it WORTH whatever it costs! Can you dig it? Heh, heh,
    I KNEW that you could! :)

    > anyway, the whole drum thing for me has been a real inspiration. My
    > ankles were shattered 11 years ago and I have a bunch of hardware
    > in my ankles. Fortunately I'm in relatively decent shape and can
    > get around fine. Taking up drums has greatly improved my leg
    > strength, stamina, and mobility range. Plus it hasn't hurt my
    > ego either..........people love to hear that a woman plays drums.


    So I strongly advise looking into a Drumframe or at least a rack.
    Before I had that, I used to have drum rug with magic marker
    outlines where things sat on it, but the memlock rack thing
    is much superior.

    Benj

    --
    SPAM-Guard! Remove .users (if present) to email me!
  2. Anne Bennett

    Anne Bennett Guest

    B = <bjacoby@users.iwaynet.net>
    L = Lacreta <lacreta8@hotmail.com>

    L> I just wanted to add how great it is to see supportive in-put from
    L> the group. And now I'm interested in the drum frame too. I have
    L> really short legs, (I'm a 5'2" woman btw) and getting to each and
    L> every drum, cymbal, cow bell, or whatever is rather interesting for
    L> me.

    I am a beginner drummer, female, and one inch shorter than you. I've been
    trying several set-ups, from the fairly standard to the quite wierd, and
    I think I'm getting closer, but it's a bit of a battle, and often I'm not
    sure whether I'm having trouble with something because the ergonomics
    are not right yet, or because I haven't yet built up the strength and
    endurance I need.

    Anyway, I'd be very interested to know how you set up your gear, if
    you don't mind explaining or showing.


    B> AS a drumframe owner let me say a couple of things about it. I
    B> think the thing is simply wonderful whether or not a person has
    B> medical difficulties or not.

    I looked at it when buying my first drum kit a few weeks ago, and was
    quite intrigued, especially after having read words of praise for it
    that had been posted here in the past. Despite the hefty price tag,
    I was tempted. Here's the main thing that stopped me, though:

    Most of my drum instruction so far came during a one-week workshop last
    July (at Guitar Workshop Plus, in Oakville, Ontario, Canada, if anyone
    is interested -- I had a great time, and learned a lot). During that
    workshop, we had some "class hours" on our own kits, which were set up
    in the "drum room", and some hours playing with other people, on drum
    kits set up in two other rooms. That suggested to me that I had better
    be able to play on a "standard" set-up, since I might not always be
    playing my own kit. I was concerned that if I learn on a DrumFrame,
    I might have difficulty adapting to a regular set-up.

    So for now, I've decided to go with standard mounts, and once (if ever!) I
    get beyond the "beginner" stage and I'm more confident in my ability to
    adapt quickly from one situation to another, I might look more seriously
    at the DrumFrame.

    Ben, you say you play both types of set-up regularly. What is your
    experience in switching back and forth?

    B> The tilt back position is extremely comfortable

    Your neck doesn't get tired from holding your head up at that angle?

    B> It's kind of a matter of how you think. Most drummers (including
    B> me in pre-drumframe days) set up the kit [stands first]
    B> I respectfully submit that this thinking is ass-backwards! What you
    B> need to do is plop your butt on the throne (or in my case drumframe
    B> chair) and then start evaluating exactly WHERE you'd like each item
    B> to be in front of you.

    I tried that a while ago; I ended up with something really weird, and
    the drums were too far apart. The sizes (depths) of the drums alone,
    even if I could suspend them with a magical anti-gravity system,
    impose some constraints, at least for a short person. A solution
    might be to decouple the pedal locations from the bass drum and hat
    locations (using a double BD pedal and a remote hihat pedal, for
    example), and have really thin toms (electronic?), but I'm not feeling
    quite that radical! Just "sending the bass drum away" would let me
    put my toms as low as I want them (well, until they crashed into the
    snare drum). Everything is just so darned big!

    The peanut gallery that wishes to point out that I'm just too darned
    small can keep its comments to itself. And kiddy sets, if they came
    in the appropriate quality, wouldn't satisfy my desire for a BIG bass
    drum sound.

    (The "really weird" part of my former set-up is that once I had the drums
    and cymbals in place, I was looking for somewhere to put a music stand,
    and I stuck it into the then-unused tom mount hole in the bass drum.
    It was funny while it lasted, and actually worked reasonably well,
    but that bass drum position prevented me from pulling the floor tom
    close enough, so it had to go.)

    Don't worry; I'll get this eventually. I'm stubborn. :)


    Anne.
    --
    Ms. Anne Bennett, Senior Sysadmin, ENCS, Concordia University, Montreal H3G 1M8
    anne@encs.concordia.ca +1 514 848-2424 x2285
  3. Glenn Dowdy

    Glenn Dowdy Guest

    "Anne Bennett" <anne@alcor.concordia.ca> wrote in message
    news:bhr52v$phc$1@newsflash.concordia.ca...
    >
    > The peanut gallery that wishes to point out that I'm just too darned
    > small can keep its comments to itself. And kiddy sets, if they came
    > in the appropriate quality, wouldn't satisfy my desire for a BIG bass
    > drum sound.
    >

    It's probably not the optimal solution, but you could always trigger your
    kick sound and use a much small kick. Kits like the Hipgig and Hipgig, Jr.
    would give you more flexible setup choices and the trigger would still give
    you that big bass drum sound.

    Glenn D.
  4. Hey folks, it's been a few years. Nice to see some familiar typers... hope
    everyone is doing well!

    <bjacoby@users.iwaynet.net> wrote in message
    news:bho7mc$56o$1@tribune.oar.net...
    > I respectfully submit that this thinking is ass-backwards! What you
    > need to do is plop your butt on the throne (or in my case drumframe
    > chair) and then start evaluating exactly WHERE you'd like each item
    > to be in front of you. Snare, hat, cymbals, pedals, toms, bells,
    > whatever. Then having figured out where you'd like the item to
    > be located THEN you figure out how to mount it in THAT spot.


    I agree with this... I start with my throne and my bass drum, hi hat and
    snare. Once those are happening where I need them, everything else gets
    fitted around. The lesser things can change, but the distance or closeness
    your legs need to hit the pedals comfortably is paramount. So much of your
    balance comes from this, and your body parts won't interact easily without
    this balance. Once this relationship is established however, I usually have
    other things in different places at each gig to some degree. It would be
    nice to have it always the same, but I don't find it's necessary, and
    sometimes it's impossible.

    As of last week I had spent the last 6 years playing with one tom up, a
    space, and 2 toms down, like floor toms... I like this because it allows my
    ride cymbal to be low, where a traditional second tom would be mounted on
    the bass drum. I bought a new kit, and have 2 toms mounted on my bass now,
    and only one down. Tonight I was playing a gig and went for that second
    ex-floor tom and hit air! Almost lost my stick! Some re-training takes
    more time than others ;)

    It's good to play with a variety of different setups, even in practice,
    because in the real gigging world you will have to fit your kit here and
    there, or play other peoples setups sometimes, and you have to be able to
    adjust to most changes without blinking to get your music out there the way
    you intend it. Ben reminded me that I should set up my memory locks.....
    they definitely help take out some of the guesswork.

    Mike
  5. "Mike Rittenhouse" <zippofluid@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:tVj0b.5428$q9.289722@read1.cgocable.net...
    > Hey folks, it's been a few years. Nice to see some familiar typers...

    hope
    > everyone is doing well!


    Yo, Mike! It HAS been a while! How're things?

    CM
  6. Anne Bennett <anne@alcor.concordia.ca> wrote: > I was tempted. Here's
    the main thing that stopped me, though:

    > That suggested to me that I had better
    > be able to play on a "standard" set-up, since I might not always be
    > playing my own kit. I was concerned that if I learn on a DrumFrame,
    > I might have difficulty adapting to a regular set-up.


    I agree with this. I don't think I'd recommend a drumframe to someone
    who had no experience with drumming at all.

    > So for now, I've decided to go with standard mounts, and once (if ever!) I
    > get beyond the "beginner" stage and I'm more confident in my ability to
    > adapt quickly from one situation to another, I might look more seriously
    > at the DrumFrame.


    Exactly! The point is once you have some experience under your belt,
    you will be much better able to judge exaclty what "your" kit should
    be and exactly how it should be set up. I would save the big cash
    for later when you have that judgement.

    > Ben, you say you play both types of set-up regularly. What is your
    > experience in switching back and forth?


    I prefer to play the DrumFrame, but I hate to haul all that heavy
    crap around. So I play both. The standard set up is more tiring
    especially in long sessions, you can't work the double pedals
    as easily and the drums etc. aren't always in the same exact
    place each time I set up the standard kit and that's annoying.
    But hey, I played a standard setup for beaucoup years before
    I got the DrumFrame so I know what it takes. (Um, you get a piece
    of rope (or an old shoestring as I observed was STILL tied to my
    old unused bass pedal) and tie the bass pedal and hat pedal to
    the throne leg... :)

    > B> The tilt back position is extremely comfortable


    > Your neck doesn't get tired from holding your head up at that angle?


    No. Your head is actualy tilted forward. You hold your head so
    it is more or less balanced on the top of your neck. It's not
    tiring.

    > B> It's kind of a matter of how you think. Most drummers (including
    > B> me in pre-drumframe days) set up the kit [stands first]
    > B> I respectfully submit that this thinking is ass-backwards! What you
    > B> need to do is plop your butt on the throne (or in my case drumframe
    > B> chair) and then start evaluating exactly WHERE you'd like each item
    > B> to be in front of you.


    > I tried that a while ago; I ended up with something really weird, and
    > the drums were too far apart. The sizes (depths) of the drums alone,
    > even if I could suspend them with a magical anti-gravity system,
    > impose some constraints, at least for a short person. A solution
    > might be to decouple the pedal locations from the bass drum and hat
    > locations (using a double BD pedal and a remote hihat pedal, for
    > example), and have really thin toms (electronic?), but I'm not feeling
    > quite that radical! Just "sending the bass drum away" would let me
    > put my toms as low as I want them (well, until they crashed into the
    > snare drum). Everything is just so darned big!


    You actually didn't try it a while ago. Because if you had, you wouldn't
    have ended up with the drums anywhere but where you wanted them!

    But you DO raise a very important point. Namely that sometimes the
    optimum drum placement means that a deep tom, for example bumps
    into the bass drum. You can only lower toms so much until they
    hit the bass. This is one reason why the second tom in a "standard"
    kit is 13" rather than the more optimum (for tuning) 14". The smaller
    tom can be moved lower.

    > The peanut gallery that wishes to point out that I'm just too darned
    > small can keep its comments to itself. And kiddy sets, if they came
    > in the appropriate quality, wouldn't satisfy my desire for a BIG bass
    > drum sound.


    My "method" still works. Start with drums where YOU want them and then
    figure out HOW to get them there. Here's one hint. Move the bass to
    the side. Use the Airto Moreira method. He uses the slave pedal of a
    double pedal as the bass pedal and the bass drum is actually off to the
    side (it isn't used as a normal double). E-drum bass or toms is another
    solution. Smaller bass drum is another. Moving toms to the side and
    hanging off a stand is yet another. Things are far from hopeless.

    > (The "really weird" part of my former set-up is that once I had the drums
    > and cymbals in place, I was looking for somewhere to put a music stand,
    > and I stuck it into the then-unused tom mount hole in the bass drum.
    > It was funny while it lasted, and actually worked reasonably well,
    > but that bass drum position prevented me from pulling the floor tom
    > close enough, so it had to go.)


    Now you're thinking!

    > Don't worry; I'll get this eventually. I'm stubborn. :)


    Good for you! Good luck!

    > Anne.


    Benj

    --
    SPAM-Guard! Remove .users (if present) to email me!
  7. "Anne Bennett" <anne@alcor.concordia.ca> wrote in message
    news:bhr52v$phc$1@newsflash.concordia.ca...
    > B = <bjacoby@users.iwaynet.net>
    > L = Lacreta <lacreta8@hotmail.com>
    >
    > L> I just wanted to add how great it is to see supportive in-put from
    > L> the group. And now I'm interested in the drum frame too. I have
    > L> really short legs, (I'm a 5'2" woman btw) and getting to each and
    > L> every drum, cymbal, cow bell, or whatever is rather interesting for
    > L> me.
    >
    > I am a beginner drummer, female, and one inch shorter than you. I've been
    > trying several set-ups, from the fairly standard to the quite wierd, and
    > I think I'm getting closer, but it's a bit of a battle, and often I'm not
    > sure whether I'm having trouble with something because the ergonomics
    > are not right yet, or because I haven't yet built up the strength and
    > endurance I need.
    >
    > Anyway, I'd be very interested to know how you set up your gear, if
    > you don't mind explaining or showing.



    Another kit to look at are the 'short stack' kits, where the toms ARE
    thinner than normal. I know DW had a kit like this, but it shouldn't be too
    hard to modify any kit with a bandsaw, drill press, and router and the
    expertise to run them, so long as the drums don't have reinforcing rings.

    You mentioned endurance, this kind of sounds like you are working too hard
    to be able to play. Just a question, do you use alot of whole arm motion, or
    mostly just forearm and wrist motion?

    What is your set up now?

    With a drum frame, the seat is like a high back car seat, the neck is
    supported by the back of the seat.

    PP
  8. John P.

    John P. Guest

    "Mike Rittenhouse" <zippofluid@hotmail.com> wrote in a message

    > As of last week I had spent the last 6 years playing with one tom up, a
    > space, and 2 toms down, like floor toms... I like this because it allows

    my
    > ride cymbal to be low, where a traditional second tom would be mounted on
    > the bass drum.


    Have you seen Neal Peart's latest rig? That's pretty much what he has going
    on. As usual, a LOT more than 3 toms. but the ride is very low over the BD
    where the second tom would usually be. I thought that looked like something
    I'd like to try.
  9. "John P." <JohnP6617@REMOVETHIScomcast.net> wrote in message
    news:cru0b.152544$It4.76750@rwcrnsc51.ops.asp.att.net...

    > Have you seen Neal Peart's latest rig? That's pretty much what he has

    going
    > on. As usual, a LOT more than 3 toms. but the ride is very low over the BD
    > where the second tom would usually be. I thought that looked like

    something
    > I'd like to try.


    About 7 years ago or so I was working super hard at developing my swing
    ride, and I had my second tom on the bass drum, and my ride 'above' that,
    if
    you know what I mean. Well, after a month or so I awoke one night with
    searing pain in my right shoulder. Since I had been holding my right arm
    ever so slightly up from the shoulder to reach the sweet spot on my ride,
    things in there(deltoid area)became inflamed, tight, and I tore my rotator
    cuff(if I
    remember the diagnosis correctly). Afterwards I went to a musicians
    medical clinic for therapy and analysis of my playing technique, and was
    strongly pushed towards lowering that cymbal so I could play it endlessly
    without having to lift my elbow from my side. I haven't had a problem
    since, but because of that injury I can only reach half as far up my back
    with that arm when I try to soap up in the shower ;) Really, I think it's
    a
    good idea to keep that arm low if you play and practice alot.

    Mike
  10. drumdude

    drumdude Guest

    i think there really cool , but really bulky if you planned on moving it
    around alot , usally everyone who demo's the one in my store likes it ....
    ive sold 2 to date : )
    "Anne Bennett" <anne@alcor.concordia.ca> wrote in message
    news:bhr52v$phc$1@newsflash.concordia.ca...
    > B = <bjacoby@users.iwaynet.net>
    > L = Lacreta <lacreta8@hotmail.com>
    >
    > L> I just wanted to add how great it is to see supportive in-put from
    > L> the group. And now I'm interested in the drum frame too. I have
    > L> really short legs, (I'm a 5'2" woman btw) and getting to each and
    > L> every drum, cymbal, cow bell, or whatever is rather interesting for
    > L> me.
    >
    > I am a beginner drummer, female, and one inch shorter than you. I've been
    > trying several set-ups, from the fairly standard to the quite wierd, and
    > I think I'm getting closer, but it's a bit of a battle, and often I'm not
    > sure whether I'm having trouble with something because the ergonomics
    > are not right yet, or because I haven't yet built up the strength and
    > endurance I need.
    >
    > Anyway, I'd be very interested to know how you set up your gear, if
    > you don't mind explaining or showing.
    >
    >
    > B> AS a drumframe owner let me say a couple of things about it. I
    > B> think the thing is simply wonderful whether or not a person has
    > B> medical difficulties or not.
    >
    > I looked at it when buying my first drum kit a few weeks ago, and was
    > quite intrigued, especially after having read words of praise for it
    > that had been posted here in the past. Despite the hefty price tag,
    > I was tempted. Here's the main thing that stopped me, though:
    >
    > Most of my drum instruction so far came during a one-week workshop last
    > July (at Guitar Workshop Plus, in Oakville, Ontario, Canada, if anyone
    > is interested -- I had a great time, and learned a lot). During that
    > workshop, we had some "class hours" on our own kits, which were set up
    > in the "drum room", and some hours playing with other people, on drum
    > kits set up in two other rooms. That suggested to me that I had better
    > be able to play on a "standard" set-up, since I might not always be
    > playing my own kit. I was concerned that if I learn on a DrumFrame,
    > I might have difficulty adapting to a regular set-up.
    >
    > So for now, I've decided to go with standard mounts, and once (if ever!) I
    > get beyond the "beginner" stage and I'm more confident in my ability to
    > adapt quickly from one situation to another, I might look more seriously
    > at the DrumFrame.
    >
    > Ben, you say you play both types of set-up regularly. What is your
    > experience in switching back and forth?
    >
    > B> The tilt back position is extremely comfortable
    >
    > Your neck doesn't get tired from holding your head up at that angle?
    >
    > B> It's kind of a matter of how you think. Most drummers (including
    > B> me in pre-drumframe days) set up the kit [stands first]
    > B> I respectfully submit that this thinking is ass-backwards! What you
    > B> need to do is plop your butt on the throne (or in my case drumframe
    > B> chair) and then start evaluating exactly WHERE you'd like each item
    > B> to be in front of you.
    >
    > I tried that a while ago; I ended up with something really weird, and
    > the drums were too far apart. The sizes (depths) of the drums alone,
    > even if I could suspend them with a magical anti-gravity system,
    > impose some constraints, at least for a short person. A solution
    > might be to decouple the pedal locations from the bass drum and hat
    > locations (using a double BD pedal and a remote hihat pedal, for
    > example), and have really thin toms (electronic?), but I'm not feeling
    > quite that radical! Just "sending the bass drum away" would let me
    > put my toms as low as I want them (well, until they crashed into the
    > snare drum). Everything is just so darned big!
    >
    > The peanut gallery that wishes to point out that I'm just too darned
    > small can keep its comments to itself. And kiddy sets, if they came
    > in the appropriate quality, wouldn't satisfy my desire for a BIG bass
    > drum sound.
    >
    > (The "really weird" part of my former set-up is that once I had the drums
    > and cymbals in place, I was looking for somewhere to put a music stand,
    > and I stuck it into the then-unused tom mount hole in the bass drum.
    > It was funny while it lasted, and actually worked reasonably well,
    > but that bass drum position prevented me from pulling the floor tom
    > close enough, so it had to go.)
    >
    > Don't worry; I'll get this eventually. I'm stubborn. :)
    >
    >
    > Anne.
    > --
    > Ms. Anne Bennett, Senior Sysadmin, ENCS, Concordia University, Montreal

    H3G 1M8
    > anne@encs.concordia.ca +1 514 848-2424

    x2285
  11. Anne Bennett

    Anne Bennett Guest

    Pete Pemberton <bfpemberton@fuse.net> writes:
    >
    > Another kit to look at are the 'short stack' kits, where the toms ARE
    > thinner than normal. I know DW had a kit like this, but it shouldn't be too
    > hard to modify any kit with a bandsaw, drill press, and router and the
    > expertise to run them, so long as the drums don't have reinforcing rings.


    !!!

    The toms sound rather nice as they are; I'd hesitate to lose
    resonance by making them shallower. Not to mention that the idea of
    cutting up my beautiful drumset: eek! Not to mention that it would wreck
    the "fade" finish...

    Let's just say that for now I'll keep trying to adjust the set! :)
    It's actually quite playable now, just probably not optimal.

    > You mentioned endurance, this kind of sounds like you are working too hard
    > to be able to play. Just a question, do you use alot of whole arm motion, or
    > mostly just forearm and wrist motion?


    I'm trying for wrist only (well, and some arm and forearm motion to
    change drums); I'm definitely not flailing around. Economy of motion
    and all that. The thing that gets tired first is my right leg, and
    part of that may just be that I'm not in shape. Sometimes my right
    hand gets a bit tired if I play the hats hard for too long, probably
    because I'm not keeping the hand relaxed enough to cushion the blows.
    That's pretty much it; physically, the rest of me feels fine so far.
    Mentally, keeping that focus is not easy, but it's improving with
    practice.

    > What is your set up now?


    Well, it's a standard five-piece set, in roughly the standard layout.
    I sit somewhat higher than "thighs horizontal" to make it easier to
    play the kick drum. I'm facing the snare drum, which tilts *very*
    slightly away from me, and whose height is such that when the tops of my
    arms are hanging loosely along my body, and my hands are in a relaxed
    orientation co-linear with my forearms, then my forearms-and-hands are
    pointing somewhat downwards from the horizontal, but my hands are not
    touching my thighs when in playing position. (Whew!)

    My bass drum is significantly offcenter from the snare. I tried to
    position it to put the pedal in a comfortable place, but my foot is still
    at an angle on the pedal -- when I tried turning the bass drum enough
    to make the pedal line up with my foot (which points out a fair bit),
    the bass drum was way to the right, and I couldn't pull the large tom
    close enough for comfort.

    Despite this, I am still able to place my two small toms (which are
    on mounts that stick up from the bass drum) in a reasonable position,
    though because of the height of the bass drum (22" diameter), the toms
    are a little bit higher than I'd prefer. It's not really a problem,
    and the three toms form a pretty smooth arc, so I can move along them
    without sudden jerky motions. In terms of distance, because my arms
    are short, my playing position for the smallest tom has my arms almost
    fully extended, I bend my arms a bit to play the middle tom, and my
    elbows are clearly bent when I play the biggest tom. The biggest tom is
    lower than the other two to help maintain that smooth arc motion when
    I move from one to the next. I have tried to angle the toms so that
    the batter heads are almost parallel to my forearm-and-hand-and-stick,
    but with a little additional tilt towards me to clear the rims.

    The hat pedal position is symmetrical to the position of the bass drum
    pedal, but unlike the case for the bass drum, I was able to orient the
    hat pedal so that my foot rests straight on it. The hats themselves are
    my handspan up from the top of the snare (7.5" approx), and at about
    10 o'clock from the snare drum (assuming I am facing noon). Viewed
    from above, the hats and snare do not overlap, but they'd just touch.
    I'm still experimenting with the placement of the crashes and ride, but
    those are easy to change around fairly independently of everything else.

    Really my biggest struggle is the bass drum and snare position. Once
    I'm happy with those, assuming I'm willing to live with the toms a
    little high (and I am), the rest is not hard.


    Anne.
    --
    Ms. Anne Bennett, Senior Sysadmin, ENCS, Concordia University, Montreal H3G 1M8
    anne@encs.concordia.ca +1 514 848-2424 x2285
  12. "Anne Bennett" <anne@alcor.concordia.ca> wrote in message
    news:bi1adf$1mh$1@newsflash.concordia.ca...
    > Pete Pemberton <bfpemberton@fuse.net> writes:
    > >
    > > Another kit to look at are the 'short stack' kits, where the toms ARE
    > > thinner than normal. I know DW had a kit like this, but it shouldn't be

    too
    > > hard to modify any kit with a bandsaw, drill press, and router and the
    > > expertise to run them, so long as the drums don't have reinforcing

    rings.
    >
    > !!!
    >
    > The toms sound rather nice as they are; I'd hesitate to lose
    > resonance by making them shallower.


    This is not the case, from what I have heard.

    PP
  13. Anne Bennett <anne@alcor.concordia.ca> wrote:

    > I'm trying for wrist only (well, and some arm and forearm motion to
    > change drums); I'm definitely not flailing around. Economy of motion
    > and all that. The thing that gets tired first is my right leg, and
    > part of that may just be that I'm not in shape.


    Yep. The standard thing. Practice!

    > Sometimes my right
    > hand gets a bit tired if I play the hats hard for too long, probably
    > because I'm not keeping the hand relaxed enough to cushion the blows.


    So if you right hand gets tired playing the hat, play it with your
    left! :) And practice!

    > That's pretty much it; physically, the rest of me feels fine so far.
    > Mentally, keeping that focus is not easy, but it's improving with
    > practice.


    Practice!

    And let me say that since practice is so important, it's not a good
    idea to do as my beginners do and practice like mad on a kit
    that's set up all inconvenient. Just ingrains bad habits. Take
    time to get at least a passable setup and then dig in!

    >> What is your set up now?

    > Well, it's a standard five-piece set, in roughly the standard layout.
    > I sit somewhat higher than "thighs horizontal" to make it easier to
    > play the kick drum. I'm facing the snare drum, which tilts *very*
    > slightly away from me, and whose height is such that when the tops of my
    > arms are hanging loosely along my body, and my hands are in a relaxed
    > orientation co-linear with my forearms, then my forearms-and-hands are
    > pointing somewhat downwards from the horizontal, but my hands are not
    > touching my thighs when in playing position. (Whew!)


    Whoa someone else set up "old School"!!! Not bad is it? I don't sit
    quite so high these days because I found sitting lower made life
    much easier on my right leg. However, you have this compromise
    thing because of the limit of how low you can make the toms go.

    In my case when my hands drop so the fingers under the sticks
    just "brush" the tops of my thighs THAT is the spot for a PERFECT
    rim shop. It gives me tactile feedback and works great.

    Benj
    --
    SPAM-Guard! Remove .users (if present) to email me!

Share This Page