Guitar I.D.

Discussion in 'rec.music.guitar' started by Adam Casey, Aug 14, 2003.

  1. Adam Casey

    Adam Casey Guest

    I just picked up this guitar for $7 at a second hand store. She's in
    need of some repairs, and that's all well and good, but I can't figure
    out what exact make and model she is.

    My hunch was that it was an old Silvertone guitar Sear's sold back in
    the 60s, but no dice.

    http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid74/pecd8f8bb6cf5fc75893d44b4cce17467/fb633d9b.jpg

    http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid74/pbf653124f2f60ad04d731998b473022c/fb633d8a.jpg

    No headstock markings.

    http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid74/pbb57c6cb8a9fb774556fc3d3ed2a8fbf/fb633d7d.jpg

    Interesting pick-up.

    Any help would be appreciated.

    -Adam
  2. Ed

    Ed Guest

    Can't help you with an identification, but I can tell you that looking at
    those pictures reminded me of some not so fine memories of farting around on
    crappy old zero fret guitars. I seem to recall having a guitar with a cowboy
    themed pickguard just like yours, and that pickup looks very similar to the
    one I installed on a classical. It was so microphonic that it actually
    worked on a nylon stringed guitar.

    My advice is to not worry about who made it. Knowing who made it is not
    going to make it any less difficult to tune or play.
  3. 'nuther Bob

    'nuther Bob Guest

    On Fri, 15 Aug 2003 19:45:07 +0900, "Ed" <gwbush@whitehouse.gov>
    wrote:

    >My advice is to not worry about who made it. Knowing who made it is not
    >going to make it any less difficult to tune or play.


    Dude!

    I know that guitar! I saw Steven Stills play it during warm up
    at Woodstock!

    OK... now you can go sell it on Ebay and say you heard it was
    valuable. Tell 'em Bob documented it, I'm well known everywhere.

    Bob
  4. Adam Casey

    Adam Casey Guest

    "Ed" <gwbush@whitehouse.gov> wrote in message news:<bhjdcc$nvq$1@cobalt01.janis.or.jp>...
    > Can't help you with an identification, but I can tell you that looking at
    > those pictures reminded me of some not so fine memories of farting around on
    > crappy old zero fret guitars. I seem to recall having a guitar with a cowboy
    > themed pickguard just like yours, and that pickup looks very similar to the
    > one I installed on a classical. It was so microphonic that it actually
    > worked on a nylon stringed guitar.
    >
    > My advice is to not worry about who made it. Knowing who made it is not
    > going to make it any less difficult to tune or play.


    Well, my main hope was to track down replacement parts. The volume
    and tone knobs along with the jack are corroded. The pick up seems to
    be in working order though.

    -Adam
  5. Ed

    Ed Guest

    "Adam Casey" <adamccasey@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:d0fce968.0308151753.338806a2@posting.google.com...
    > "Ed" <gwbush@whitehouse.gov> wrote in message

    news:<bhjdcc$nvq$1@cobalt01.janis.or.jp>...
    > > Can't help you with an identification, but I can tell you that looking

    at
    > > those pictures reminded me of some not so fine memories of farting

    around on
    > > crappy old zero fret guitars. I seem to recall having a guitar with a

    cowboy
    > > themed pickguard just like yours, and that pickup looks very similar to

    the
    > > one I installed on a classical. It was so microphonic that it actually
    > > worked on a nylon stringed guitar.
    > >
    > > My advice is to not worry about who made it. Knowing who made it is not
    > > going to make it any less difficult to tune or play.

    >
    > Well, my main hope was to track down replacement parts. The volume
    > and tone knobs along with the jack are corroded. The pick up seems to
    > be in working order though.


    Good luck. And believe me Bob, you'll need it. I've seen my fair share of
    no-name zero fret guitars and the one thing I do remember about them is that
    they all seem to have been built by companies that have long since
    disappeared. They have been built in Italy, England (Vox has no shame at
    all), and various banana producing countries.
    My suggestion is to keep hitting up garage sales, flea markets and such in
    order to find another one to use as a parts bin (actually, my advice is to
    stuff it in the attic and forget about it). You might get lucky and find
    another $7 wonder that is the exact duplicate of your guitar or was
    manufactured using the parts you want. There is no way on gawd's green earth
    that you'll find that stuff down at your local guitar store or by contacting
    the manufacturer. It would be like going to your local chevy dealer and
    asking them for a set of 1955 studebaker hubcaps.

    On the plus side, you can always try to sell it on fleabay as an exotic
    naturally reliced vintage guitar. Put a high reserve on it and those boyahs
    will eat it up.
  6. TuskBuffer

    TuskBuffer Guest

    If the pickup seems to work fine, why not just replace the pots? In lieu of
    that, try contact cleaner to free up some of the corrosion. I don't know
    how bad they are, but it does a good job cleaning up "crackling" knobs.

    I just recently picked one up that looks like the same manufacturer as
    yours--same type bridge and tailpiece, even the sunburst pattern looks
    similar. It looks like there was an oval-shaped plate on the headstock at
    one time, which has been removed. I'm guessing it was the maker's name.
    I've seen guitars like these on eBay with most saying (guessing) they were
    made by Harmony. Mine's got two pickups and a whammy bar, and actually
    stays in tune pretty well! It sounds like crap compared to my other
    guitars, but what the heck? It's always fun to find a good deal anyway,
    right?
    --
    You've got the best guitar
    You've got the best amp
    Now get the best pick!
    http://www.tuskbuffer.com


    "Adam Casey" <adamccasey@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:d0fce968.0308141050.411d6375@posting.google.com...
    > I just picked up this guitar for $7 at a second hand store. She's in
    > need of some repairs, and that's all well and good, but I can't figure
    > out what exact make and model she is.
    >
    > My hunch was that it was an old Silvertone guitar Sear's sold back in
    > the 60s, but no dice.
    >
    >

    http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid74/pecd8f8bb6cf5fc75893d44b4cce17467/fb633d9b.jpg
    >
    >

    http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid74/pbf653124f2f60ad04d731998b473022c/fb633d8a.jpg
    >
    > No headstock markings.
    >
    >

    http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid74/pbb57c6cb8a9fb774556fc3d3ed2a8fbf/fb633d7d.jpg
    >
    > Interesting pick-up.
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated.
    >
    > -Adam
  7. Adam Casey

    Adam Casey Guest

    > Good luck. And believe me Bob, you'll need it. I've seen my fair share of
    > no-name zero fret guitars and the one thing I do remember about them is that
    > they all seem to have been built by companies that have long since
    > disappeared. They have been built in Italy, England (Vox has no shame at
    > all), and various banana producing countries.
    > My suggestion is to keep hitting up garage sales, flea markets and such in
    > order to find another one to use as a parts bin (actually, my advice is to
    > stuff it in the attic and forget about it). You might get lucky and find
    > another $7 wonder that is the exact duplicate of your guitar or was
    > manufactured using the parts you want. There is no way on gawd's green earth
    > that you'll find that stuff down at your local guitar store or by contacting
    > the manufacturer. It would be like going to your local chevy dealer and
    > asking them for a set of 1955 studebaker hubcaps.
    >
    > On the plus side, you can always try to sell it on fleabay as an exotic
    > naturally reliced vintage guitar. Put a high reserve on it and those boyahs
    > will eat it up.



    Well, I'm not exactly looking for vintage parts or anything, just
    looking for leads on when it could have been made, where, etc.

    I think I'm going to keep the cracked and chipped pickguard and just
    replace the knobs and jack (the pick-up doesn't appear to be
    corroded.)

    -Adam
  8. I might have an idea....it looks a whole lot like an old Teisco that I had as a first
    electric. The body, pickguard and funky pickup are identical. I thought mine said Teisco on
    the headstock, but yours may be from a different time period, when perhaps they didn't put the
    brand name on there. At any rate, I think there is a VERY good chance that it is a Teisco.

    As a guitar, it worked for a first electric, but mine really was a piece of crap. The pickups
    are so bad, you can talk into them and hear it through the amp. Blech! I got mine in the mid
    70's....yours may be a little older.

    Hope this helps!

    Mike P.



    Adam Casey wrote:

    > I just picked up this guitar for $7 at a second hand store. She's in
    > need of some repairs, and that's all well and good, but I can't figure
    > out what exact make and model she is.
    >
    > My hunch was that it was an old Silvertone guitar Sear's sold back in
    > the 60s, but no dice.
    >
    > http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid74/pecd8f8bb6cf5fc75893d44b4cce17467/fb633d9b.jpg
    >
    > http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid74/pbf653124f2f60ad04d731998b473022c/fb633d8a.jpg
    >
    > No headstock markings.
    >
    > http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid74/pbb57c6cb8a9fb774556fc3d3ed2a8fbf/fb633d7d.jpg
    >
    > Interesting pick-up.
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated.
    >
    > -Adam
  9. Mark

    Mark Guest

    adamccasey@yahoo.com (Adam Casey) wrote in message news:<d0fce968.0308141050.411d6375@posting.google.com>...
    > I just picked up this guitar for $7 at a second hand store. She's in
    > need of some repairs, and that's all well and good, but I can't figure
    > out what exact make and model she is.
    >
    > My hunch was that it was an old Silvertone guitar Sear's sold back in
    > the 60s, but no dice.
    >
    > http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid74/pecd8f8bb6cf5fc75893d44b4cce17467/fb633d9b.jpg
    >
    > http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid74/pbf653124f2f60ad04d731998b473022c/fb633d8a.jpg
    >
    > No headstock markings.
    >
    > http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid74/pbb57c6cb8a9fb774556fc3d3ed2a8fbf/fb633d7d.jpg
    >
    > Interesting pick-up.
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated.
    >
    > -Adam


    Looks like an old Kay or Teisco from the Sears catalog. Maybe.

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