Help re: Developing strong double strokes

Discussion in 'rec.music.percussion' started by Jonathan Khoo, Sep 1, 2003.

  1. Hi all,

    Recently i've come to a point in my playing where i feel i need to really
    get back to the basics of my technique and get all my dysfunctional playing
    habits/incompetencies sorted out. :) In trying to rework my double strokes
    (which are way weaker compared to single strokes), I'm not sure which method
    or technique to pursue. I was wondering if any of you guys could shed some
    light on how you went about developing them.
    When i first started learning, i worked thru some of stick control, which i
    will do for sure again. My doubles currently consist of an initial stroke
    with the wrist, then trying to snap the 2nd note back into the hand with the
    fingers. When i practiced it, i didn't accent the 2nd note, just worked more
    with the bounce of the stick. I find that this method doesn't hold up too
    well when going to the toms, where head tension is looser - i find myself
    losing power and definition very quickly. Overall, this method feels weak
    and uneven sounding to me - I'm not sure whether I'm approaching it
    correctly?

    One method (from Weckl's Back to Basics vid) involves accenting the 2nd note
    of the double so that it remains strong and even when the tempo is
    increased. Is this a good way to go?

    Can anyone break down how the wrist and the fingers work with the double
    stroke at a slow and at a fast tempo? Does the technique change after a
    certain point in speed?

    I'll be tracking down my old teacher soon to get some lessons with all this,
    as well - but i was just wondering what other ways there are out there of
    approaching this.

    Thanks in advance :)
    Jon
  2. Dan Radin

    Dan Radin Guest

    "Jonathan Khoo" <jkhoo@NOSPAMiinet.net.au> wrote in message
    news:3f52eb8b$0$23608$5a62ac22@freenews.iinet.net.au...
    > One method (from Weckl's Back to Basics vid) involves accenting the 2nd

    note
    > of the double so that it remains strong and even when the tempo is
    > increased. Is this a good way to go?


    IMHO, no. Just p[ractice aiming for consistency with no accenets, and on
    every surface you can find: all different drums, pillows, your bed, your
    shoe sole, your thigh, the carpet, etc. But don't use the bounce. Stroke it
    out with your fingers. You need to develop those muscles and get your brain
    to understand how to make them fire.

    > Can anyone break down how the wrist and the fingers work with the double
    > stroke at a slow and at a fast tempo? Does the technique change after a
    > certain point in speed?


    Wrist makes one stroke; fingers makes two. That's why it's a double stroke.
    It's like dribbling a basketball or yo-yoing. Think throw and catch. Yes,
    obviously, there will be a certain tempo when you'll need to switch back
    over to just using the bounce, the the point is to gain the control to never
    need to.

    > I'll be tracking down my old teacher soon to get some lessons with all

    this,

    There's your ideal approach.
  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    In article <k7L4b.833$Qk4.801@nwrdny03.gnilink.net>, Dan Radin
    <dan.radin@verizon.net> wrote:


    >
    > Wrist makes one stroke; fingers makes two. That's why it's a double stroke.
    > It's like dribbling a basketball or yo-yoing. Think throw and catch. Yes,
    > obviously, there will be a certain tempo when you'll need to switch back
    > over to just using the bounce, the the point is to gain the control to never
    > need to.
    >


    I've always thought of the accenting the second hit as a way of
    developing the "throw and catch" feel as well as fostering a more even
    dynamic level

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