Home Stereo Reccomendations?

Discussion in 'rec.audio.pro' started by James Crabbe, Aug 22, 2003.

  1. James Crabbe

    James Crabbe Guest

    I want to get a new home stereo system (receiver and speakers) and I
    am interested to hear some reccomendations on affordable flat response
    consumer home stereo equiptment. I use Audix 1a's for my home studio.
    I don't have much to spend (around $300) so I can't afford all of the
    nice audio file stuff. Thanks
  2. Les Cargill

    Les Cargill Guest

    James Crabbe wrote:
    >
    > I want to get a new home stereo system (receiver and speakers) and I
    > am interested to hear some reccomendations on affordable flat response
    > consumer home stereo equiptment. I use Audix 1a's for my home studio.
    > I don't have much to spend (around $300) so I can't afford all of the
    > nice audio file stuff. Thanks


    All you'll get for $300 is a glorified boom box.

    --
    Les Cargill
  3. Not really.

    There's some decent cheap stuff out there, such as KLH Audio. You can put
    together a system with speakers, receiver, woofer, and CD player for $300,
    especially when Best Buy has a sale.


    Les Cargill wrote...

    > James Crabbe wrote...


    >> I want to get a new home stereo system (receiver and speakers) and I
    >> am interested to hear some recomendations on affordable flat response
    >> consumer home stereo equiptment. I use Audix 1a's for my home studio.
    >> I don't have much to spend (around $300) so I can't afford all of the
    >> nice audio file stuff. Thanks


    > All you'll get for $300 is a glorified boom box.
  4. On Fri, 22 Aug 2003 12:19:03 -0700, "William Sommerwerck"
    <williams@nwlink.com> wrote:

    >Not really.
    >
    >There's some decent cheap stuff out there, such as KLH Audio. You can put
    >together a system with speakers, receiver, woofer, and CD player for $300,
    >especially when Best Buy has a sale.


    ??? I fail to see how that's anything other than a glorified boom box.

    Kal
  5. Arny Krueger

    Arny Krueger Guest

    "James Crabbe" <j.crabbe@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:c6752a79.0308221003.52834bfa@posting.google.com

    > I want to get a new home stereo system (receiver and speakers) and I
    > am interested to hear some recommendations on affordable flat response
    > consumer home stereo equipment.


    Home component stereo equipment has, as a rule flat response, even the
    highly affordable stuff.

    >I use Audix 1a's for my home studio.


    If you like their sound, why not try them out with a home audio type
    receiver?

    > I don't have much to spend (around $300) so I can't afford all of the
    > nice audio file stuff. Thanks


    Put your money into the speakers.
  6. Les Cargill

    Les Cargill Guest

    William Sommerwerck wrote:
    >
    > Not really.
    >
    > There's some decent cheap stuff out there, such as KLH Audio. You can put
    > together a system with speakers, receiver, woofer, and CD player for $300,
    > especially when Best Buy has a sale.
    >


    I haven't seen receivers that weren't surround engines for a while at
    box stores. They tend to be enough to blow a $300 budget, but I could
    easily be missing one or two.

    > Les Cargill wrote...
    >
    > > James Crabbe wrote...

    >
    > >> I want to get a new home stereo system (receiver and speakers) and I
    > >> am interested to hear some recomendations on affordable flat response
    > >> consumer home stereo equiptment. I use Audix 1a's for my home studio.
    > >> I don't have much to spend (around $300) so I can't afford all of the
    > >> nice audio file stuff. Thanks

    >
    > > All you'll get for $300 is a glorified boom box.



    --
    Les Cargill
  7. The Beemer

    The Beemer Guest

    "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
    news:hoednToFk4E279uiXTWJhA@comcast.com...

    > >I use Audix 1a's for my home studio.

    >
    > If you like their sound, why not try them out with a home audio type
    > receiver?
    >


    When I bought my Mackie HR824's, the Alesis Monitor Ones ended up in the
    living room hooked up to a $150 Kenwood receiver. First time I could
    honestly say that they really sounded good.

    DB
  8. It's cheap stuff made in China. But the speakers are decent. It's junk, but good
    junk -- and a heck of a lot better than any boom box -- or those insipid little
    "executive" systems.


    >> There's some decent cheap stuff out there, such as KLH Audio.
    >> You can put together a system with speakers, receiver, woofer,
    >> and CD player for $300, especially when Best Buy has a sale.


    > ??? I fail to see how that's anything other than a glorified boom box.
  9. > I haven't seen receivers that weren't surround engines for a while at
    > box stores. They tend to be enough to blow a $300 budget, but I could
    > easily be missing one or two.


    You can still buy cheap two-channel receivers for $80 or so when on-sale.
  10. You could also buy used equipment.

    You could a lot worse than a pair of Advent Large speakers and an Advent 300
    receiver. With some luck, you can get both on eBay for $225 to $250 (not
    including shipping).

    You could also rummage through a local dealer's used-equipment stock, but retail
    dealers tend to charge too much for used stuff (though you'll probably get a
    30-day warranty which you won't get on eBay).
  11. Geoff Wood

    Geoff Wood Guest

    "James Crabbe" <j.crabbe@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:c6752a79.0308221003.52834bfa@posting.google.com...
    > I want to get a new home stereo system (receiver and speakers) and I
    > am interested to hear some reccomendations on affordable flat response
    > consumer home stereo equiptment. I use Audix 1a's for my home studio.
    > I don't have much to spend (around $300) so I can't afford all of the
    > nice audio file stuff. Thanks


    Pretty unlike to get much for $300 but our best bet would be to visit a HiFi
    recycling type store, and pick up premium separate components at hopefully
    bargain prices.

    All you need is a pair of speakers and a power amp, if you have a CD player
    with variable output level , for a bare-bones basic system (and beyond).


    geoff
  12. Mark Gifford

    Mark Gifford Guest

    j.crabbe@verizon.net (James Crabbe) wrote in message news:<c6752a79.0308221003.52834bfa@posting.google.com>...
    > I want to get a new home stereo system (receiver and speakers) and I
    > am interested to hear some reccomendations on affordable flat response
    > consumer home stereo equiptment. I use Audix 1a's for my home studio.
    > I don't have much to spend (around $300) so I can't afford all of the
    > nice audio file stuff. Thanks


    Spend a Saturday or two going to garage/yard sales. It's amazing what
    you can pick up. I'd be a little leary of buying speakers, but you can
    find tons of nice older receivers, CD players and tape decks for
    pennies on the dollar. Not to mention all the other goodies you can
    find - take $20 and half a day and come home with a whole carful of
    stuff. <g>

    So far this summer I've picked up a really nice 70's Onkyo 40WPC
    receiver for my wife's art studio, like new for $15, and a few CD
    players (Pioneer, Denon, Sony) for $10/ea. I passed on a component
    Marantz system (preamp/power amp) for $40, a few weeks ago. I think
    that the older stuff is built better and sounds better than anything
    you could get at Best Buy. I've also scored an early 60's Ludwig
    6.5x15 snare in VGC for fifty cents and an original EH Small Stone
    Phaser for $5.

    That'll also allow you to get better speakers - I have a pair of
    Tannoy SBM's I got for $100, hooked up to a late 70's Marantz w/185WPC
    and it sounds really good, to me. The Tannoy PBM 6.5's are great
    little speakers, too. I used to recommend them to my friends who were
    looking for stereo systems, and they all wound up buying them over
    anything consumer.

    Good Luck,

    Mark
  13. Sugarite

    Sugarite Guest

    > I want to get a new home stereo system (receiver and speakers) and I
    > am interested to hear some reccomendations on affordable flat response
    > consumer home stereo equiptment. I use Audix 1a's for my home studio.
    > I don't have much to spend (around $300) so I can't afford all of the
    > nice audio file stuff. Thanks


    I routinely find decent used stereo amps for under $60. For some reason
    people think they become obselete. An 80's Yamaha has a nice neutral
    output, and for $200 I'd look into Mission speakers. If you don't already
    know, it's pretty tough to beat an $80 DVD player with anything short of a
    $500 CD player. I recommend Toshiba DVD players, 24/192 DAC. Actually, if
    you're not after audiophile gear, there's not much reason to spend more than
    $300 unless you want serious power or glammy cosmetics. I still think
    surround sound is a farce and a huge waste of money.
  14. normanstrong

    normanstrong Guest

    "James Crabbe" <j.crabbe@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:c6752a79.0308221003.52834bfa@posting.google.com...
    > I want to get a new home stereo system (receiver and speakers) and

    I
    > am interested to hear some reccomendations on affordable flat

    response
    > consumer home stereo equiptment. I use Audix 1a's for my home

    studio.
    > I don't have much to spend (around $300) so I can't afford all of

    the
    > nice audio file stuff. Thanks


    Philips MC-50 shelf system costs only $150, and is reviewed favorably
    in the January 2003 issue of Consumer Reports. It has everything you
    want--even a remote control--plus a cassette player.

    Norm Strong
  15. Les Cargill

    Les Cargill Guest

    Sugarite wrote:
    >
    > > I want to get a new home stereo system (receiver and speakers) and I
    > > am interested to hear some reccomendations on affordable flat response
    > > consumer home stereo equiptment. I use Audix 1a's for my home studio.
    > > I don't have much to spend (around $300) so I can't afford all of the
    > > nice audio file stuff. Thanks

    >
    > I routinely find decent used stereo amps for under $60. For some reason
    > people think they become obselete.


    Where are you guys finding these things?

    > An 80's Yamaha has a nice neutral
    > output, and for $200 I'd look into Mission speakers. If you don't already
    > know, it's pretty tough to beat an $80 DVD player with anything short of a
    > $500 CD player. I recommend Toshiba DVD players, 24/192 DAC. Actually, if
    > you're not after audiophile gear, there's not much reason to spend more than
    > $300 unless you want serious power or glammy cosmetics. I still think
    > surround sound is a farce and a huge waste of money.



    --
    Les Cargill
  16. James Boyk

    James Boyk Guest

    A student of mine went to Harvard graduate school in astrophysics, and his first day of classes happened to be trash pickup day in the neighborhood of his apartment. Bicycling to school, he suddenly realized that two houses ago, he'd passed something inter
    esting. He went back and found a Fisher 500C receiver (primo-quality tube unit). He put it on his bike's carrier and after classes took it home and plugged it in. It worked perfectly; didn't even need alignment of the FM section. On the other hand, this wa
    s the same guy who discovered a comet in his first term; so maybe he was born under a lucky star.


    James Boyk
  17. Arny Krueger

    Arny Krueger Guest

    "James Boyk" <boyk@caltech.edu> wrote in message
    news:bi9aag$e30$1@naig.caltech.edu...

    > A student of mine went to Harvard graduate school in astrophysics, and his

    first day of classes happened to be trash pickup day in the neighborhood of
    his apartment. Bicycling to school, he suddenly realized that two houses
    ago, he'd passed something interesting. He went back and found a Fisher 500C
    receiver (primo-quality tube unit). He put it on his bike's carrier and
    after classes took it home and plugged it in. It worked perfectly; didn't
    even need alignment of the FM section. On the other hand, this was the same
    guy who discovered a comet in his first term; so maybe he was born under a
    lucky star.

    Which brings up the quality of old tubed receivers. These days I take abuse
    becuase the best tubed amp I ever owned was a Dyna Stereo 70. However, if
    you match up a Dyna 70 with the comparable Fisher receiver (the 500/800),
    the Fisher receiver is a poor weak sister.

    In Mac clinics Dynas usually came out around 30 wpc by Mac standards, but
    the Fisher 500s were a notch down at 25 wpc or less.

    Tube amps live or die based on the quality of their transformers. It has
    been observed that a 500C was pretty much like the lower-powered 400 with
    7591s replacing the 7868s. The good news is that 7591s are back in
    production after a long (and expensive for owners!) hiatus, but 7868s are
    NOS or nuttin'.

    If you find one of these pieces today, unless someone has worked it over,
    it's a big collection of dead and dying electrolytic caps. In the case of
    the 500/800 the power switch is also on the endangered list.

    Bottom line is that these old tube receivers were designed to beat weight
    and heat constraints, and are highly compromised examples of the art of
    tubed electronics.
  18. >> I still think surround sound is a farce and a huge waste of money.

    I've had surround sound for 33 years. You don't know what you're missing.
  19. Arny Krueger

    Arny Krueger Guest

    "William Sommerwerck" <williams@nwlink.com> wrote in message
    news:vkhbumisppi096@corp.supernews.com
    >>> I still think surround sound is a farce and a huge waste of money.

    >
    > I've had surround sound for 33 years. You don't know what you're
    > missing.


    Agreed.

    I'm of the opinion that the most useful parts of what is now called
    *surround sound* technology are subwoofers and center channel speakers. I've
    had those for over 25 years.
  20. Arny Krueger

    Arny Krueger Guest

    "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
    news:fuOcnd8se9IqCdWiXTWJkw@comcast.com

    > Bottom line is that these old tube receivers were designed to beat
    > weight and heat constraints, and are highly compromised examples of
    > the art of tubed electronics.


    I gag every time I see some tube enthusiast going ga-ga over old Lafayette
    tubed equipment. I worked for the Detroit Lafayette Associate Stores (one of
    the more sucessful in the nation) in the days of tubes. While they had a
    few pieces of really good stuff (the 60 wpc Citation-clone basic power amp
    and the every-eq-curve-known-to-man preamp) much of their bread-and-butter
    stuff was vile crap on the best day of its life.

    A horrific example of this were Lafayette's 18-30 wpc tubed receivers, which
    I think were copies of or built by Kenwood. At any rate it was pretty well
    known (and documented by one of the mainstream audio magazines) that these
    had some of the worst tubed amp sections ever called "hi Fi", Grommes
    notwithstanding.

    The problem was in the output transformers. They had a fault I had
    previously seen in a similar-sized output transformer I cribbed from an old
    AM car radio. Above 5-6 Khz and modest power levels, there was a
    nonlinearity that was apparently put there to make AM sound bright. This
    same part also showed up in some integrated amp derivatives of the receiver
    line. AFAIK it persisted until Lafayette switched over to solid state. The
    receiver did a nice job on FM if you listened through the tape monitor
    jacks.

    I don't know how many 100's of these POS I saw go out the door. They were
    pretty reliable too - reliably crappy!

    Bottom line caution for tube enthusiasts - just because it's tubed doesn't
    mean its good.

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