Home studio??/

Discussion in 'Digital Audio & Recording' started by alejandro7, Aug 25, 2004.

  1. alejandro7

    alejandro7 New Member

    Messages:
    74
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    What all equipment would be needed to build a home studio? I'm getting some sound proff cloth for the walls, a mpc 2000 and a lap top. what else would i need?
  2. pineapple

    pineapple New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You need only a few things to get going.. a mixer, behringer or phonics, are pretty good n cheap. A sound card with 2 in, 2 out (i use a SoundTrack Audio DSP24 Value). Then some studio monitors. Roland are good and a computer. With all the leads, a recording program, maybe some plug-ins and ur done
  3. hayer

    hayer New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    digi002, some mices and you are set dude!
  4. CyberCat

    CyberCat Active Member

    Messages:
    3,100
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
  5. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

    Messages:
    980
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Building a decent studio is a lot harder than you might be led to believe - and, certainly, you are not going to get much for $1,000!

    However, the first thing you have to consider is that it's not the quality of the studio or the equipment in it which is important - it's the quality of the material you record and the engineer driving the whole thing.

    A good song, recorded on a cassetrte in a bathroom, is still a good song. A bad song, recorded with the finest equipment available to man and with the best engineer behind the desk, is still a bad song!
  6. Halabalooza

    Halabalooza New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    when my freind built his studio, he bought all his stuff from a radio station that was getting new equipment, and it was all pretty enexpensive
  7. bigbaddave81

    bigbaddave81 New Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    if you want to be able to use your computer for playback of multiple tracks and be able to mix each track separately on a mixing console, look into getting a MOTU setup w/ some software like logic or sonar. MOTU also comes with its own sequencing software but I have not tried it.
  8. johnrowley

    johnrowley Member

    Messages:
    884
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Sequencing software varies a lot. I use Cubase VST on a win98 PC 1Ghz and 512 mb memory. Works well. Use the Audigy sound card for direct audio to the hard drive. Soundfonts are ok or outboard midi, I use Sampletank which loads from the hard drive and is awesome for the quality of the sounds produced.
  9. CyberCat

    CyberCat Active Member

    Messages:
    3,100
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    If you buy stuff at full retail prices then it would be hard to get a whole lot of quality stuff for the money. If you do some bargen hunting, you can get some very good deals.

    A few years back one of my friends bought a package deal from someone at Guitar Center, and got: computer, w/ some 60 GB space. Cakewalk Sonar, Echo Gina, Equipment rack, TR-Rack, RA-100, Mackie 1202-VLZ, Kurzweil controller keyboard (88-keys), PL-8, two stanton turntables plus a mixer, and three or four good mics, all for $600.
  10. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

    Messages:
    980
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sure - I'm not disputing that you can get some good deals by shopping around, but this requires that you also have some knowledge of what it is you are buying.

    Even so, this $1,000 figure which is being kicked around is still very much on the low side, especially if you have any pretensions towards high quality. A decent two channel soundcard could cost half the total budget!

    Most of my studio was built on the cheap, but there's several thousands of dollars worth of stuff (hardware and software) in it - and it wouldn't rate as much more than basic.
  11. CyberCat

    CyberCat Active Member

    Messages:
    3,100
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    What do you have?
  12. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

    Messages:
    980
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Why? Is it that important?

    Surely it's the results which count, not the the means to achieve them.

    Just off the top of my head, there's a P4 3 GHz computer with 1Mb RAM, dual monitors and the usual complement of big hard disks and CD recorders/players. A Yamaha 01x digital mixer, LynxOne audio card and a Soundblaster (used only for soundfont stuff) A couple of GM modules (Casio and Roland) and a Casio VZ8-M. Monitoring is a Quad 303 driving a pair of Rogers LS2's. That's the basic hardware (which blows a $1,000 budget right out the window before you go any further).

    On the software side, I have Audition, Sonar and Cubase SX (plus a ton of lesser stuff).

    Instruments are a Fender Strat and a Tele, Ztar Z6, Korg Z3, plus a Prophet 2000 and an MK149 midi keyboard. Several mics, although the only one of any note is an Ocatava MK219.

    ... and that's just what I use for making music. Add in the stuff I use for restoration work and it comes to a tidy sum of money - even though much of it was bought 'on the cheap'.
  13. CyberCat

    CyberCat Active Member

    Messages:
    3,100
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Sounds like you've got some nice stuff.

    How do you like the Yamaha 01x digital mixer?
  14. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

    Messages:
    980
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    In truth, I'm somewhat ambivalent about it.

    If you know what this thing does, you'll understand why I bought in preference to a multi-input audio card (actually I have a C-Port, purchased for a specific project, but I'm not very impressed by its performance). My original thought was a Lynx Two C - but that was much the same price as the 01x, so the Yamaha really does represent excellent value for money, it's almost like getting the mixer part for free :) .

    On the downside, it's quite complex and finding your way around it is not very intuitive, it took me about three weeks to get even remotely 'comfortable' with it and I still find myself scratching my head occasionally, wondering why it's not doing what I thought I'd asked it to do. Fortunately, there is a graphical presentation available (the 'StudioManager') and that has saved my bacon on more than one occasion. Some people have had issues with CPU 'spiking' and high processing overhead - although it's not been a problem for me - and it's very picky about the associated hardware, for example, it will only work with a limited number of Firewire cards.

    Similarly, although it's touted as being integrated with a number of leading softwares, it seems to me that it works best in conjunction with CuBase SX - which, as a longtime Cakewalk user, is a little unfortunate for me.

    The main disadvantage (for me) is I work with Audition most of the time, but the software does not understand ASIO so I can't use the Yamaha with it. At the moment, I'm still having to use my old Folio SX analogue mixer with Audition. I consider this to be a failure of Adobe - there is simply no excuse for not having ASIO support these days. If the next upgrade does not have it, I will get off the Adobe bus and use something else.

    As a stand-alone unit the 01x is very good and a real bargain at the price. However, the future of mLan (the Yamaha bus protocol) seems somewhat vague, so I don't think the 01x would be a good purchase for anyone looking to expand later, they might just find themselves with an expensive doorstop - not a problem for me, but might be for others.
  15. CyberCat

    CyberCat Active Member

    Messages:
    3,100
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Alright, thanks for the explanation.

    The reason I asked is because I was considering getting one for my studio. But I've decided against it since I don't do enough "pro" level work to really justify such an investment, the music's just a hobby I enjoy.
  16. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

    Messages:
    980
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    As it is for me. However, I do work with audio for a living as well, so I have the advantage that some of the stuff I purchase for 'work' can also be used for 'play'.

    Actually, the Yamaha was bought for the music, so I guess it should be considered primarily as a 'hobby' purchase.

Share This Page