MIDI Guitar

Discussion in 'Guitar' started by dysongs, Sep 14, 2003.

  1. dysongs

    dysongs New Member

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    I've been using a Roland Guitar synths for over 10 years now.
    I play Roland GR50 and GR33. I'd like to hear views of other midi guitar users and see how you use the instrument. There is some info on my website.(plus a few other free music tech resources) www.dysongs.com
  2. tricky83

    tricky83 New Member

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    I have a Casio Midi Guitar which can be used as a normal electric guitar and has a built in guitar to mid converter. i found it quite interesting when I got it but to be honest haven't used the midi side much, I found it wasn't very accurate due to all the overringing of open strings. Any advice would be muchly appreciated :)
  3. dysongs

    dysongs New Member

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    Casio Midi Guitar

    Hi Trick,

    Yes I used to have one for a short while. It has a built in synth sound source and if I remember there was not only the guitar lead but a midi lead and a power lead to connect up so it was all a-dangling down.

    I also found at first that you have to approach playing the guitar from a different aspect when triggering midi. I remember reading "forget 'Michael Row The Boat Ashore'" meaning its no use just strumming the strings cos it'll sound so naff (not that I ever played MRTBA - well not in public anyway!) so it's a case of picking the strings or plucking SOME of the strings to get the best effect. You do have to clean up your act and not let open strings ring (damp with your right hand) and even now my fingers momentarily brush against a string causing a harmonic that triggers a midi sound.

    But you can deal with this to a certain extent by adjusting the height of the midi pickup to desensitise the strings signal to the pickup or (and this is where it gets a bit murky) I THINK you can reduce the signal level per string electronically by using a setting. Have a look in your manual if you still have it. You certainly can do this on all the Roland Synths.

    Once you have made an adjustment and got the thing working to your liking and get used to it, you might like to hook it up to your PC and midi sequencer, dial up a guitar sound on your module and sound card and PROGRAM IN a guitar solo into your midi arrangements! I once did this for one of the Casio CTK series of
    GM keyboards (circa 1992) as they commissioned me to produce some guitar patterns for it.

    On there own, a synthesized guitar sound straight out of the sound module is pretty unconvincing, but connect up a guitar controller and use all your bends and slides and pull offs and mutes, the sound is a lot better!

    Best of luck

    Kev
  4. tricky83

    tricky83 New Member

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    Thanks for the advice Kev. I know what you mean about midi guitar sounds sounding a bit 'unconvincing' when played on a midi keyborad or whatever, but it seems only us guitarists think this! I'll be digging the guitar out to have a play and try some of your suggestions, I might be posting on here again to let you know how it goes.

    Thanks again.
  5. saxmidiman

    saxmidiman Member

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    I use a Roland GR-1 and have been using it to create parts in my midi files. It tends to double trigger once in a while, and sometimes I have to configure my sequencer not to register the pitch wheel, but otherwise it's great. Worth all the money spent on it.

    I have used it on stage in my early years, as keyboard players were not available.

    Once you've got it configured, it's pretty cool.:thumbsup:

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