MIDI Guitars

Discussion in 'Sequencing Hardware' started by M.O.T.E., May 4, 2003.

  1. M.O.T.E.

    M.O.T.E. New Member

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    What kind of MIDI guitar do you use?
    Is it any good?
    how well does it write MIDI?
    How much didi it cost?
  2. vectorsync

    vectorsync New Member

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    I used the Roland system for about a year and it was OK. Seperate pick up and floor unit. Midi out. Loads of fun and considerable scope for writing with a sequencer etc. Prefer their physical modeller though.
  3. milee

    milee New Member

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    How much does that pleasure cost?
  4. chucki

    chucki New Member

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    I use a so called "digitar", but I don't know whether it is still produced. Some information. http://www.ilio.com/ilio/digitar/
    I use it together with am Roland JV 1080.

    Greetings from germany
  5. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

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    I use a Ztar - which is not really a guitar, but a keyboard instrument which (sort of) looks like a guitar. It knocks spots off standard pitch to midi instruments, but it does take a bit of getting used to (especially if you use it as a tapping instrument - which seems to be where most Ztar users end up).

    It's very good, since it does not suffer from the problems of pitch to midi conversion - no glitches, odd notes, latency or any of the other problems P/M systems suffer from.

    If you play the right notes, they will appear in the sequencer as you played them. With P/M conversion, while OK in a live situation, I always had to edit out all sorts of little things before the track was usable in a studio recording.

    The downside - they're not cheap. These are custom-built instruments and their price reflects that fact. I own a Z6, cost me about 3,000 euros second-hand, by the time I'd paid for shipping and import duties to Spain from the USA. However, it's the best money I have ever spent and the capabilities of the instrument are awesome - in fact, I doubt many owners explore more than 10% of what can be done with one, I know I haven't!

    There are models from some $1,500 upwards - more details on their website - www.starrlabs.com - if it's something you like to think about.
  6. deadboy

    deadboy Member

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    I've messed with a roland synth a little bit.. but its been a long time.

    I'd like to get one also.
  7. gIGoN

    gIGoN New Member

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    haha guitar mids ...it's quite to find the good ones
  8. gIGoN

    gIGoN New Member

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    i mean quite hard hehe
  9. saxmidiman

    saxmidiman Member

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    Have a Roland GR1. Cost me over 2000.00 It does a great job if you don't mind tons of pitch wheel bends.
  10. S1an1de

    S1an1de New Member

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    i used to have a proper midi guitar (yes it had steel strings and normal pickups) made by........wait for it....... CASIO ....it it was nice. The pitch conversion was a tad flakey and you had to play incredibly precisley, but if you layered synth and real it was very usable, both live and in the studio.

    Best bit i guess is...there are several on E-bay ranging from $100 to $300, i swapped it for a Status Headless bass, which i am honestly a little sick about :(
  11. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

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    Still highly sought after by some people - I might even spring for something like a 380 myself, if one were to turn up at the right sort of price.

    Unfortunately, time has taken its toll and many of these instruments are now suffering from electronic problems, not unrepaiable, but still a failry major bit of work (which involves changing all the capacitors, which are SM devices).



    Nothing has really changed - modern pitch to midi systems are exactly the same - which is why I went to the Ztar.

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