Monitor Spec Query

Discussion in 'rec.audio.pro' started by Monroe, Aug 25, 2003.

  1. Monroe

    Monroe Guest

    Looking for an opinion on monitor spec's for viewing text and graphics
    (but predominantly sequence graphics) at a distance of approximately
    36 inches. Add to that, slight near-sightedness. Was thinking good
    AG 19 inch (NEC/Mitsu) at 800 x 600 res. What do you think? Up this
    to say a good 21 - 22 inch? . . . but I've never used this size screen
    before . . . .some say that working with standard office documents is
    difficult on a larger screen . . . also (and I'll show my ignorance
    of the matter here, never actually having the opportunity to compare
    two monitors side-by-side, and not completely understanding monitor
    spec's), given identical resolution on a 19 and. 22 inch monitor,
    would this result in identical physical text size?.

    Thanks for any and all.
    --

    Monroe
  2. It depends on the resolution and the dot pitch of the monitor. First
    of all, you should be looking for a flatpanel monitor. There's no
    reason to buy a new CRT today. For one thing, the price difference
    will be negated by the difference in power cost. Secondly, there's no
    excuse for sitting around with a giant radiation cannon blasting at
    your head all day now that there's a good alternative. So buy a
    flatpanel monitor, and buy the biggest one you can afford. A finer
    dot-pitch will give a sharper image, but looking at a relatively
    "coarse" screen at a distance of 3 feet will theoretically be similar
    to looking at a finer, but smaller, screen at a closer distance. If
    that makes any sense. Flatpanel monitors do work far better at their
    native resolution than at any other resolution, but for any
    decent-sized monitor that will be substantially higher than the 800x600
    you mention.

    As for your last question, if the 19 and 22 inch monitors were both set
    for the same resolution, the text would be larger on the 22-inch
    screen. Remember that the resolution is the total number of pixels on
    the screen, so a bigger screen means bigger pixels. This is about
    video data, not screen elements.

    A related discussion is the number of illuminating elements on a
    screen. This is determined by the pitch of the screen, and its size.
    A finer-pitched screen will have more illuminating elements (LEDs on a
    flatpanel). And for a given pitch, a larger screen will have more
    LEDs. With a flatpanel monitor, the maximum data resolution is limited
    by the number of LEDs on the screen.

    ulysses

    Monroe <amonroe@telusplanet.net> wrote:

    > Looking for an opinion on monitor spec's for viewing text and graphics
    > (but predominantly sequence graphics) at a distance of approximately
    > 36 inches. Add to that, slight near-sightedness. Was thinking good
    > AG 19 inch (NEC/Mitsu) at 800 x 600 res. What do you think? Up this
    > to say a good 21 - 22 inch? . . . but I've never used this size screen
    > before . . . .some say that working with standard office documents is
    > difficult on a larger screen . . . also (and I'll show my ignorance
    > of the matter here, never actually having the opportunity to compare
    > two monitors side-by-side, and not completely understanding monitor
    > spec's), given identical resolution on a 19 and. 22 inch monitor,
    > would this result in identical physical text size?.
    >
    > Thanks for any and all.
    > --
    >
    > Monroe
  3. Brian Takei

    Brian Takei Guest

    Justin Ulysses Morse (ulysses@rollmusic.com) wrote:
    > First of all, you should be looking for a flatpanel monitor.
    > There's no reason to buy a new CRT today.


    This is 'generally' not true, but almost certainly true for adequately
    funded studio applications, particularly where CRT emissions cause
    interference with audio signals.

    > For one thing, the price difference
    > will be negated by the difference in power cost.


    This seems quite the stretch. Do you have numbers to support this?

    A couple more points regarding flat panels:

    - generally more expensive to repair out-of-warrantee
    - can develop dead pixels, which may not be covered by warrantee
    - changing screen resolutions may be disappointing, as you indicated
    - more limited off-axis viewing

    + much smaller; a hell of a lot lighter; more portable
    + generally provides a better image
    + viewable area is the same as its size; a CRT's viewable area is about
    an inch less, so rememember to account for this when comparing prices
    (e.g. compare 18" panel to 19" crt).

    Of course, setting the price issues aside, a flat panel usually wins
    hands down.

    Regards,
    - Brian

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