OT: Deep thoughts while on the john

Discussion in 'rec.music.percussion' started by Steve V, Sep 2, 2003.

  1. Steve V

    Steve V Guest

    Hey ladies.. I mean, laddies. 'Been hanging out in Hawaii, north
    shore Oahu. The only thing good about being back is 1. my drums 2. my
    gas grill 3. my own john.

    Anyway, while on the john I did some thinking. I remembered how at
    age 5 (and up) I used to make drum sets out of tupperware, coffee
    cans, pots/pans, pillows, and cardboard boxes, and in my mind I was
    making some pretty good grooves. Yet my parents hadn't a clue. Never
    did they consider about putting me in band, or even a "will somebody
    get that kid a real drum!?" I was good at a lot of other things. I
    was musical, artistic, athletic, mechanically inclined. They did put
    me in piano lessons --which was a good thing, but man.. *yawn!* I
    wanted to hit stuff with sticks!! The usual "too loud" excuse about
    getting a drum always prevailed. I just let it die. Here I am in my
    30's finally developing my rhythmic talent, among other things.

    For those of you with kids, pay close attention to what their
    interests are and do whatever you can to cultivate their talents.
    Talk to them, ask questions, be part of their world. Every kid has
    the potential for something huge --as parents we need to find out what
    that is. Raising kids is SO much more than putting food on the table
    and clothes on their back.

    <*sniff* I need a Kleenex>

    SV
  2. Glenn Dowdy

    Glenn Dowdy Guest

    Re: Deep thoughts while on the john

    "Steve V" <svallee@ihpc.net> wrote in message
    news:40c75d83.0309011906.8944e8c@posting.google.com...
    >
    > For those of you with kids, pay close attention to what their
    > interests are and do whatever you can to cultivate their talents.
    > Talk to them, ask questions, be part of their world. Every kid has
    > the potential for something huge --as parents we need to find out what
    > that is. Raising kids is SO much more than putting food on the table
    > and clothes on their back.
    >

    My 15 month old already has his own drum kit, and by the time he's five
    he'll have 3/4 size guitars and basses to try out. I too never had the
    chance to play music until late in life, so I don't want mine to have to
    miss out.


    > <*sniff* I need a Kleenex>
    >

    TMI.

    Glenn D.
  3. Re: Deep thoughts while on the john

    While, in theory I agree with you, but I gotta say that your parents were
    right too. If you ask me, piano lessons is the best way to start off in
    music in the western world. It gives you such a great grasp on the
    structure and 'rules' of western music theory, that it is much easier to
    pick up other melodic instruments. Sure kids will want to bang on stuff,
    but if you think they have the skill and motivation to persue music, piano
    lessons (as painful as they may be for the kid) may be a blessing in
    disguise.

    Personally, I was given the option of taking up an instrument in elementary
    school band (which I did -- percussion) or take piano lessons. I don't
    regret learning percussion at all, but I do wish I had paid more attention
    to the keyboard instruments.

    --
    Kevin Buffardi
    "Rockstars -- is there
    anything they don't know?"
    -Homer Simpson
  4. -MIKE-

    -MIKE- Guest

    Re: Deep thoughts while on the john

    > My 15 month old already has his own drum kit, and by the time he's five
    > he'll have 3/4 size guitars and basses to try out. I too never had the
    > chance to play music until late in life, so I don't want mine to have to
    > miss out.
    > .....
    >
    > Glenn D.



    That's cool, Glenn.

    But be careful, you might turn him into a jock. :)


    -MIKE-

    --
    http://mikedrums.com
    mike@mikedrumsDOT.com
    ---remove "DOT" ^^^^ to reply
  5. Adam

    Adam Guest

    Re: Deep thoughts while on the john

    Kevin Buffardi (kbuff1xw@mwc.edu) wrote:

    > While, in theory I agree with you, but I gotta say that your
    > parents were right too. If you ask me, piano lessons is the
    > best way to start off in music in the western world. It gives
    > you such a great grasp on the structure and 'rules' of western
    > music theory, that it is much easier to pick up other melodic
    > instruments. Sure kids will want to bang on stuff, but if you
    > think they have the skill and motivation to persue music,
    > piano lessons (as painful as they may be for the kid) may be a
    > blessing in disguise.


    Yeah.
    I started piano when I was seven, and absolutely hated it. I hated
    it for years, until eventually the playing, theory and knowledge of
    harmony just clicked. I'm not and never have been a good pianist,
    but I can play well enough by ear to entertain myself. Piano is
    invaluable if you want to write music, or if you want to study
    theory, and very useful if you want to go on to study music at
    university.
    Now I am just very thankful my parents made me stick it for all
    those years :)

    --
    <INSERT SIG HERE>
  6. Dik LeDoux

    Dik LeDoux Guest

    Re: Deep thoughts while on the john

    "Steve V" <svallee@ihpc.net> wrote in message
    news:40c75d83.0309011906.8944e8c@posting.google.com...
    <snip>
    > <*sniff* I need a Kleenex>


    You sure it isn't TP you need?

    Dik
  7. Glenn Dowdy

    Glenn Dowdy Guest

    Re: Deep thoughts while on the john

    "-MIKE-" <mike@mikedrumsDOT.com> wrote in message
    news:8TednaJEsa58usmiXTWJjg@comcast.com...
    > >
    > > Glenn D.

    >
    >
    > That's cool, Glenn.
    >
    > But be careful, you might turn him into a jock. :)
    >

    As long as his sport isn't football, basketball, baseball or hockey, it'll
    be okay.

    Glenn D.
  8. Steve V

    Steve V Guest

    Re: Deep thoughts while on the john

    "Kevin Buffardi" <kbuff1xw@mwc.edu> wrote in message news:<bj16uo$dulnu$1@ID-80902.news.uni-berlin.de>...
    > While, in theory I agree with you, but I gotta say that your parents were
    > right too. If you ask me, piano lessons is the best way to start off in
    > music in the western world. It gives you such a great grasp on the
    > structure and 'rules' of western music theory, that it is much easier to
    > pick up other melodic instruments. Sure kids will want to bang on stuff,
    > but if you think they have the skill and motivation to persue music, piano
    > lessons (as painful as they may be for the kid) may be a blessing in
    > disguise.
    >
    > Personally, I was given the option of taking up an instrument in elementary
    > school band (which I did -- percussion) or take piano lessons. I don't
    > regret learning percussion at all, but I do wish I had paid more attention
    > to the keyboard instruments.



    They didn't see it as a starting point, they just really wanted me to
    play piano. But yes, the piano lessons really did open my eyes to
    music theory early on, as well as singing in the choir at school. I
    sang alto, and to hear my part in relation to the other three I would
    read the music and tap the alto part with my right hand while tapping
    another w/ my left. At least it's paying off now.. I can read/write
    drum notation with ease. TABs are VERY limited and visually
    confusing.
  9. JaKe

    JaKe Guest

    Steve V wrote:
    >
    > Hey ladies.. I mean, laddies. 'Been hanging out in Hawaii, north
    > shore Oahu. The only thing good about being back is 1. my drums 2. my
    > gas grill 3. my own john.
    >
    > Anyway, while on the john I did some thinking. I remembered how at
    > age 5 (and up) I used to make drum sets out of tupperware, coffee
    > cans, pots/pans, pillows, and cardboard boxes, and in my mind I was
    > making some pretty good grooves.


    I saw a dude at The Bumbershoot festival in Seattle yesterday who
    strapped on a big ol pasta pot, coffee cans, and a large plastic carboy
    jug. He also used empty plastic bottle filled with pennies taped to his
    feet. Anyway, he had a huge crowd and he was banging away havin' a
    blast while his bucket filled up and overflowed with cash. So maybe he
    never grew up and got a set of dem der drums after all :)

    --
    JaKe, Seattle
    "The monk bought lunch"
    Jim Morrison
  10. J.R.

    J.R. Guest

    Re: Deep thoughts while on the john

    "Steve V" <svallee@ihpc.net> wrote in message
    news:40c75d83.0309011906.8944e8c@posting.google.com...
    > Hey ladies.. I mean, laddies. 'Been hanging out in Hawaii, north
    > shore Oahu. The only thing good about being back is 1. my drums 2. my
    > gas grill 3. my own john.
    >
    > Anyway, while on the john I did some thinking. I remembered how at
    > age 5 (and up) I used to make drum sets out of tupperware, coffee
    > cans, pots/pans, pillows, and cardboard boxes, and in my mind I was
    > making some pretty good grooves. Yet my parents hadn't a clue. Never
    > did they consider about putting me in band, or even a "will somebody
    > get that kid a real drum!?" I was good at a lot of other things. I
    > was musical, artistic, athletic, mechanically inclined. They did put
    > me in piano lessons --which was a good thing, but man.. *yawn!* I
    > wanted to hit stuff with sticks!! The usual "too loud" excuse about
    > getting a drum always prevailed. I just let it die. Here I am in my
    > 30's finally developing my rhythmic talent, among other things.
    >
    > For those of you with kids, pay close attention to what their
    > interests are and do whatever you can to cultivate their talents.
    > Talk to them, ask questions, be part of their world. Every kid has
    > the potential for something huge --as parents we need to find out what
    > that is. Raising kids is SO much more than putting food on the table
    > and clothes on their back.


    That's sort of what my parents did with me. They got me a sort of low grade
    drum set because they saw I had a lot of pent up rage from getting
    humiliated in school. Then the lessons came. At first that kinda sucked all
    the fun out of it because I was playing my way and learning a lot I think,
    and it was hard to do it someone else's way. Sometimes if they have the
    music in them, teaching may actually set them back.

    My parents never understood me a lot, they still don't really, but they did
    hit it lucky when they got me into playing drums.

    JR
  11. Re: Deep thoughts while on the john

    in article vl9t5gqoj7nlbf@corp.supernews.com, J.R. at me@here.com wrote on
    9/2/03 12:49 PM:

    > Sometimes if they have the
    > music in them, teaching may actually set them back.


    I've heard it said many times - but with decent teaching, I've never known
    it to happen - though it may seem that way to the kid/student at the time.

    DC

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