Passable Live Band Recording (personal) How to?

Discussion in 'rec.audio.pro' started by Matt, Aug 19, 2003.

  1. Matt

    Matt Guest

    My needs are pretty simple. I'm in a Senior Drum and Bugle Corps. It's
    near the end of our season this summer and I'd like to make some audio
    recordings during our final practice before Finals. Our final
    rehearsal weekend is this coming weekend and so my timeline is short.
    This won't be anything remotely professional, but just something to
    keep for mementos and to distribute to others in the corps. For those
    that have no idea of what Senior Corps is, just think professional
    marching band without woodwinds, so we're talking brass and percussion
    spread out moving on a football field.

    I don't want to do something crappy like a walkman recording with a
    single mike but I certainly can't afford to go out and purchase high
    quality microphones, audio mixing software, mixing board, etc. I just
    want to make the best audio recording I can with equipment I could buy
    at Best Buy or something similar (audio only). Could anyone suggest
    some options? I know some people dub live Corps performances using
    dual small microphones hooked to a Personal Dat Recorder. Would this
    be able to deal with the enormous changes in volume? I do mean
    enormous.

    I figured this might be a decent group to ask this kind of question.
    Thanks for any responses.
  2. Abyssmal

    Abyssmal Guest

    On 19 Aug 2003 10:39:32 -0700, mphilmon@pobox.com (Matt) wrote:

    >My needs are pretty simple. I'm in a Senior Drum and Bugle Corps. It's
    >near the end of our season this summer and I'd like to make some audio
    >recordings during our final practice before Finals. Our final
    >rehearsal weekend is this coming weekend and so my timeline is short.
    >This won't be anything remotely professional, but just something to
    >keep for mementos and to distribute to others in the corps. For those
    >that have no idea of what Senior Corps is, just think professional
    >marching band without woodwinds, so we're talking brass and percussion
    >spread out moving on a football field.
    >
    >I don't want to do something crappy like a walkman recording with a
    >single mike but I certainly can't afford to go out and purchase high
    >quality microphones, audio mixing software, mixing board, etc. I just
    >want to make the best audio recording I can with equipment I could buy
    >at Best Buy or something similar (audio only). Could anyone suggest
    >some options? I know some people dub live Corps performances using
    >dual small microphones hooked to a Personal Dat Recorder. Would this
    >be able to deal with the enormous changes in volume? I do mean
    >enormous.
    >
    >I figured this might be a decent group to ask this kind of question.
    >Thanks for any responses.


    Some people use Dat recorders, Mini disc recorders, or laptops to
    record live outdoor events or for doing field recording.

    Personally, I think you should have the boys in the corps ante up, and
    hire a local studio to come out and record the performance.

    Having the equipment and knowledge to record in a studio is difficult
    enough. Add to that a moving sound source, environment and wind noise,
    and inexperience on your part, and it makes more sense to me for you
    to hire a local engineer to do the job.

    They should be able to come out and record, take it back to edit/
    process in the studio, and deliver the master and some copies for not
    too much cash.

    I know a few local people in my area that have done recordings such as
    this for local colleges and opera/theatre groups, and maybe charged
    $500 to record, master, and deliver 25 copies.


    If you feel competent, you could rent gear from a local recording
    studio, or music store.But unless you know how to achieve a good
    result, you would probably be better off hiring a local
    studio/engineer to do the job.

    Randall
  3. Matt <mphilmon@pobox.com> wrote:

    >My needs are pretty simple. I'm in a Senior Drum and Bugle Corps. It's
    >near the end of our season this summer and I'd like to make some audio
    >recordings during our final practice before Finals. ...


    This kind of application is our bread and butter.

    The solution you choose will depend on your budget.

    For around $250 you can get pretty darned good sounding recordings:
    Sharp portable MD recorder (MD-MT877, -MT831, or Sony MZ-N1, -N10, -N909
    or R900) and a set of our LC Binaural microphones. None of the portable
    MD recorders have digital outputs so if you want to transfer the
    recordings to computer or a CD burner, you'll have to do it via an
    analog link or buy a home MD deck with a digital output.

    For around $900 you can get a Sony TCD-D100 portable DAT recorder and a
    set of our CS Binaural mics. It has a digital output and it's
    relatively easy to digitally transfer your recordings to other devices.

    For a bit more you can get our new PDAudio system that uses PDAs (like
    the HP iPAQ) as a digital audio recorder, and records to Compact Flash
    memory cards or hard disk. Please see our Web site for more details.

    --
    Len Moskowitz PDAudio, Binaural Mics, Cables, DPA, M-Audio
    Core Sound http://www.stealthmicrophones.com
    Teaneck, New Jersey USA http://www.core-sound.com
    moskowit@core-sound.com Tel: 201-801-0812, FAX: 201-801-0912
  4. Mike Rivers

    Mike Rivers Guest

    In article <bqs4kv8tsoienvs8bn7nbbejml6pvn1o92@4ax.com> rshawve2@tampabay.rr.com writes:

    > Personally, I think you should have the boys in the corps ante up, and
    > hire a local studio to come out and record the performance.


    That's a halfway good idea, but unless the "studio" has experience in
    recording such a group in their natural habitat (few do), a better
    idea would be to bring the band to a studio. Have them set up and play
    a few tunes, and not march around on a field. You're not going to be
    doing overdubs, and with a few run-throughs the engineer should be
    able to place mics for a decent two-track recording.

    If you're recording the music for the music's sake, that's what you
    should record - not the wind, not the erratic mic positions, not the
    flubs caused by playing while marching. If you want to capture the
    experience of the band marching around on the field, get a video
    camera and walk backwards in front of them.



    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
  5. Menaradio

    Menaradio Guest

    It is a delimea..how to get a good recording with out tons of expensive
    equipment...

    the best place to start is not just with the mis..but also your location...it
    needs to be a place with good acoustics little echo..

    then you can simply....get a f fairly good mic...and mini disc recorder...mini
    disc does a little compression of it's own in the format so it helps with the
    quiet places..even the portable pocket type work well..

    Place the mics high over the sound so you get a good blend...but not too high
    it will start to sound hollow...and that's about the best I can tell you
    here....
  6. Abyssmal

    Abyssmal Guest

    On 19 Aug 2003 18:01:32 -0400, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers)
    wrote:

    >
    >In article <bqs4kv8tsoienvs8bn7nbbejml6pvn1o92@4ax.com> rshawve2@tampabay.rr.com writes:
    >
    >> Personally, I think you should have the boys in the corps ante up, and
    >> hire a local studio to come out and record the performance.

    >
    >That's a halfway good idea, but unless the "studio" has experience in
    >recording such a group in their natural habitat (few do), a better
    >idea would be to bring the band to a studio. Have them set up and play
    >a few tunes, and not march around on a field. You're not going to be
    >doing overdubs, and with a few run-throughs the engineer should be
    >able to place mics for a decent two-track recording.


    True, it would be better to bring the band to a studio.But the cost of
    that would be far greater than a simple stereo setup in the field.I do
    not know where in the country he is, but at least 10 studios I know of
    in my area offer some type of location recording.Even a small studio
    engineer with a laptop setup could probably do it better than this
    gentleman, if he instructs them on how to best proceed.

    We recorded an opera for a girl I knew that was finishing college, and
    wanted a demo to take with her to New York.It was not as good as it
    would have been in a studio setting, but it sounded pretty good.And we
    didnt have to spend days overdubbing and mixing.
    >
    >If you're recording the music for the music's sake, that's what you
    >should record - not the wind, not the erratic mic positions, not the
    >flubs caused by playing while marching. If you want to capture the
    >experience of the band marching around on the field, get a video
    >camera and walk backwards in front of them.


    True, they could use a video camera or boombox if they wanted to
    capture the live sound.Some of the people I know that do location
    would do a much more professional sounding job though.

    Randall
  7. Mike Rivers

    Mike Rivers Guest

    In article <02r6kvktk9b84rjslddg1l7n8p2to1ka24@4ax.com> rshawve2@tampabay.rr.com writes:

    > True, it would be better to bring the band to a studio.But the cost of
    > that would be far greater than a simple stereo setup in the field.


    Maybe, maybe not. Depends on whether the cost of the equipment is
    included in the cost of the simple field setup. But my real point is
    that it's unlikely that a simple field setup will produce usable
    results, at least when operated by an inexperienced person.

    So what's the cost of not having a recording versus having a good
    recording? Partly it depends on the purpose of the recording. If it's
    just a souvenier, then by all means use a single point stereo mic
    setup, a wind screen, and whatever recorder the budget allows. It will
    sound something like the band. But if you're looking for a recording
    that can sell, that's not the way to get it.

    > We recorded an opera for a girl I knew that was finishing college, and
    > wanted a demo to take with her to New York.It was not as good as it
    > would have been in a studio setting, but it sounded pretty good.And we
    > didnt have to spend days overdubbing and mixing.


    Yeah, but she wasn't outside, and marching around a field either. I
    suppose he could set up a makeshift studio indoors.



    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)

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