PC audio question: Crystal WDM or SB64?

Discussion in 'rec.audio.pro' started by Bob Jones, Aug 28, 2003.

  1. Bob Jones

    Bob Jones Guest

    I'm using an IBM PC300PL desktop that has built-in Crystal WDM Audio.

    My question: Is the Crystal audio as good as the SoundBlaster 64 card
    I had in my previous computer? If I want to use the SB64 in this PC,
    is there any way to bypass the existing Crystal Audio?
  2. Rob Reedijk

    Rob Reedijk Guest

    Bob Jones <questionz_99@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > I'm using an IBM PC300PL desktop that has built-in Crystal WDM Audio.


    > My question: Is the Crystal audio as good as the SoundBlaster 64 card
    > I had in my previous computer? If I want to use the SB64 in this PC,
    > is there any way to bypass the existing Crystal Audio?


    I have the same computer with a high-quality sound card installed in a
    PCI slot (quite a bit better than a Soundblaster). The Crystal is still
    there and I believe I can use it if I want to, but I don't. It works fine.
    I don't think you have to "bypass" anything. It is just a matter of
    selecting the SB64 either in your control panels or within whatever
    software you are using.

    Rob R.
  3. Arny Krueger

    Arny Krueger Guest

    "Bob Jones" <questionz_99@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:4396eabe.0308271941.419c2da4@posting.google.com
    > I'm using an IBM PC300PL desktop that has built-in Crystal WDM Audio.
    >
    > My question: Is the Crystal audio as good as the SoundBlaster 64 card
    > I had in my previous computer?


    For MIDI or for record/playback?

    The Crystal Audio probably does a better job than a SB64 for simultaneous
    record/playback type work.

    >If I want to use the SB64 in this PC,
    > is there any way to bypass the existing Crystal Audio?


    Yes. Just set the SB64 as the preferred device using the Control Panel
    multimedia icon.
  4. Bob Jones

    Bob Jones Guest

    Rob Reedijk <reedijk@hera.med.utoronto.ca> wrote in message news:<bil15v$g1d$1@news1.chem.utoronto.ca>...
    > I have the same computer with a high-quality sound card installed in a
    > PCI slot (quite a bit better than a Soundblaster).


    Rob, I've encountered a problem with the 300PL. My SoundBlaster card
    needs a 32-bit slot, and the CPU in this machine is encased in some
    sort of gigantic heat sink that appears to be secured with motherboard
    spacers.

    Due to the odd design of the 300PL, The heat sink thing blocks the
    32-bit slot, and I can't remove the sink because of the spacers. I
    think I'm out of luck there unless you have any other ideas.

    Bob
  5. Rob Reedijk

    Rob Reedijk Guest

    I don't know much about PCs...but what I do know about the 300PL is
    that it was some sort of more affordable but less modifyable PC.

    Ferinstance, the motherboard is a sort of one piece thing with the audio,
    networking ports and everything built right into it.

    I also know what you mean about the CPU. I couldn't remove mine either.
    I have also heard you can't really put in a faster CPU. I suppose you
    can clock it faster if you feel lucky...

    The manual is downloadable, by the way. I never tried really hard to
    get the CPU out. It might be in the manual.

    My machine is working very well running win98 with Wavelab 4.0, the
    Lexicon CoreII, plextor burner and a a second large harddrive. It
    is extremely stable. I only use it for "mastering" projects and
    burning loads and loads of CDs. I don't think I will fool around
    with it for fear of something bad happening.

    Rob R.

    Bob Jones <questionz_99@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > Rob Reedijk <reedijk@hera.med.utoronto.ca> wrote in message news:<bil15v$g1d$1@news1.chem.utoronto.ca>...
    >> I have the same computer with a high-quality sound card installed in a
    >> PCI slot (quite a bit better than a Soundblaster).


    > Rob, I've encountered a problem with the 300PL. My SoundBlaster card
    > needs a 32-bit slot, and the CPU in this machine is encased in some
    > sort of gigantic heat sink that appears to be secured with motherboard
    > spacers.


    > Due to the odd design of the 300PL, The heat sink thing blocks the
    > 32-bit slot, and I can't remove the sink because of the spacers. I
    > think I'm out of luck there unless you have any other ideas.
  6. Arny Krueger

    Arny Krueger Guest

    "Bob Jones" <questionz_99@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:4396eabe.0308271941.419c2da4@posting.google.com
    > I'm using an IBM PC300PL desktop that has built-in Crystal WDM Audio.
    >
    > My question: Is the Crystal audio as good as the SoundBlaster 64 card
    > I had in my previous computer? If I want to use the SB64 in this PC,
    > is there any way to bypass the existing Crystal Audio?


    One other question. Does this computer even have an ISA slot to plug the
    SB64 into?
  7. Bob Jones

    Bob Jones Guest

    > One other question. Does this computer even have an ISA slot to plug the
    > SB64 into?


    Arny, at this point I may be getting confused about the different
    types of slots. Is the SB64 actually an ISA card, or 32-bit -- or are
    they they same thing?

    The 300 PL has several slots that would fit the SB card, if the SB
    card had a lower clearance or the CPU were not encased in an oversized
    heat sink!

    I'm trying to make another decision regarding the video. The IBM, as
    Rob said, has a lot of stuff built in, like 4-meg S3 video. I have a
    4-meg Trident Maxi Gamer Phoenix PCI card as well, and wonder if
    either would be expected to provide a better display.

    So far, the IBM seems to be a pretty decent machine, although it has a
    weird internal design. It has a P3-550 CPU, the memory looks to be
    easily upgradeable, and I've managed to install the hard drive and
    CDRW from my old PC into this one.

    Bob
  8. Arny Krueger

    Arny Krueger Guest

    "Bob Jones" <questionz_99@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:4396eabe.0308291834.42bfbc6@posting.google.com
    >> One other question. Does this computer even have an ISA slot to plug
    >> the SB64 into?

    >
    > Arny, at this point I may be getting confused about the different
    > types of slots. Is the SB64 actually an ISA card, or 32-bit -- or are
    > they they same thing?


    A SB64 is an ISA, 16-bit card.

    > The 300 PL has several slots that would fit the SB card, if the SB
    > card had a lower clearance or the CPU were not encased in an oversized
    > heat sink!


    OK.

    > I'm trying to make another decision regarding the video. The IBM, as
    > Rob said, has a lot of stuff built in, like 4-meg S3 video. I have a
    > 4-meg Trident Maxi Gamer Phoenix PCI card as well, and wonder if
    > either would be expected to provide a better display.


    Not much difference between those two.

    > So far, the IBM seems to be a pretty decent machine, although it has a
    > weird internal design. It has a P3-550 CPU, the memory looks to be
    > easily upgradeable, and I've managed to install the hard drive and
    > CDRW from my old PC into this one.


    I'm typing this on a 666 MHz P2, so I agree with the idea that machines with
    500-700 mHz processors are still usable. I still do some audio editing on
    it. OTOH, the other machine on this KVM switch is a 2000 MHz box that is
    exclusively for audio.
  9. Rob Reedijk

    Rob Reedijk Guest

    Bob Jones <questionz_99@yahoo.com> wrote:

    > So far, the IBM seems to be a pretty decent machine, although it has a
    > weird internal design. It has a P3-550 CPU, the memory looks to be
    > easily upgradeable, and I've managed to install the hard drive and
    > CDRW from my old PC into this one.


    Hold the phone...you have a P3-550 CPU in there? I was told that for
    whatever reason, this machine was not P3 upgradeable. Mine has the
    "stock" Intel Pentium II-300 CPU in there. Does anyone know about this?
    Arny? I really don't know about PCs. I thought that the chip was
    physically unable to be fit in there if it was a P3. The PC is an
    IBM 300PL in case anyone is interested.

    Rob R.
  10. Arny Krueger

    Arny Krueger Guest

    "Rob Reedijk" <reedijk@hera.med.utoronto.ca> wrote in message
    news:biq9e5$upt$1@news1.chem.utoronto.ca
    > Bob Jones <questionz_99@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >> So far, the IBM seems to be a pretty decent machine, although it has
    >> a weird internal design. It has a P3-550 CPU, the memory looks to be
    >> easily upgradeable, and I've managed to install the hard drive and
    >> CDRW from my old PC into this one.

    >
    > Hold the phone...you have a P3-550 CPU in there?


    No, a p3-550.

    > I was told that for
    > whatever reason, this machine was not P3 upgradeable.


    Hmmm. Searching google on IBM PL300 I find references for this model up to
    700 MHz.

    > Mine has the
    > "stock" Intel Pentium II-300 CPU in there. Does anyone know about
    > this? Arny? I really don't know about PCs. I thought that the chip
    > was physically unable to be fit in there if it was a P3.


    AFAIK there were definately motherboards that could run P2 & P3 processors
    over the range of 233 to 700 MHz. RAM chip (speed) upgrades may also be
    required in addition to CPU upgrades.

    > The PC is an IBM 300PL in case anyone is interested.
  11. Rob Reedijk

    Rob Reedijk Guest

    Arny Krueger <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote:
    > "Rob Reedijk" <reedijk@hera.med.utoronto.ca> wrote in message
    > news:biq9e5$upt$1@news1.chem.utoronto.ca
    >> Bob Jones <questionz_99@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >>> So far, the IBM seems to be a pretty decent machine, although it has
    >>> a weird internal design. It has a P3-550 CPU, the memory looks to be
    >>> easily upgradeable, and I've managed to install the hard drive and
    >>> CDRW from my old PC into this one.

    >>
    >> Hold the phone...you have a P3-550 CPU in there?


    > No, a p3-550.


    Huh?

    Rob R.
  12. Arny Krueger

    Arny Krueger Guest

    "Rob Reedijk" <reedijk@hera.med.utoronto.ca> wrote in message
    news:bisqur$5at$2@news1.chem.utoronto.ca
    > Arny Krueger <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote:
    >> "Rob Reedijk" <reedijk@hera.med.utoronto.ca> wrote in message
    >> news:biq9e5$upt$1@news1.chem.utoronto.ca
    >>> Bob Jones <questionz_99@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >>>> So far, the IBM seems to be a pretty decent machine, although it
    >>>> has a weird internal design. It has a P3-550 CPU, the memory looks
    >>>> to be easily upgradeable, and I've managed to install the hard
    >>>> drive and CDRW from my old PC into this one.
    >>>
    >>> Hold the phone...you have a P3-550 CPU in there?

    >
    >> No, a p3-550.

    >
    > Huh?


    Somehow I read P3-350 which of course makes no sense at all.
  13. Well, I can say that a PII is not pin compatible with a PIII, so a CPU
    changeover is not possible.

    --


    Roger W. Norman
    SirMusic Studio
    Purchase your copy of the Fifth of RAP CD set at www.recaudiopro.net.
    See how far $20 really goes.




    "Rob Reedijk" <reedijk@hera.med.utoronto.ca> wrote in message
    news:biq9e5$upt$1@news1.chem.utoronto.ca...
    > Bob Jones <questionz_99@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    > > So far, the IBM seems to be a pretty decent machine, although it has a
    > > weird internal design. It has a P3-550 CPU, the memory looks to be
    > > easily upgradeable, and I've managed to install the hard drive and
    > > CDRW from my old PC into this one.

    >
    > Hold the phone...you have a P3-550 CPU in there? I was told that for
    > whatever reason, this machine was not P3 upgradeable. Mine has the
    > "stock" Intel Pentium II-300 CPU in there. Does anyone know about this?
    > Arny? I really don't know about PCs. I thought that the chip was
    > physically unable to be fit in there if it was a P3. The PC is an
    > IBM 300PL in case anyone is interested.
    >
    > Rob R.
  14. Ooops, my son just told me I'm wrong. Not that a PII and PIII are pin
    compatible, but there obviously are some boards, particularly with slot 1
    that can accept either a PII or PIII. My bad. Fuck, isn't it bad enough
    that you have to maintain knowledge on all the new stuff, much less who does
    what with older stuff?

    --


    Roger W. Norman
    SirMusic Studio
    Purchase your copy of the Fifth of RAP CD set at www.recaudiopro.net.
    See how far $20 really goes.




    "Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
    news:bj2fkb$b8s$1@bob.news.rcn.net...
    > Well, I can say that a PII is not pin compatible with a PIII, so a CPU
    > changeover is not possible.
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    > Roger W. Norman
    > SirMusic Studio
    > Purchase your copy of the Fifth of RAP CD set at www.recaudiopro.net.
    > See how far $20 really goes.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Rob Reedijk" <reedijk@hera.med.utoronto.ca> wrote in message
    > news:biq9e5$upt$1@news1.chem.utoronto.ca...
    > > Bob Jones <questionz_99@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > >
    > > > So far, the IBM seems to be a pretty decent machine, although it has a
    > > > weird internal design. It has a P3-550 CPU, the memory looks to be
    > > > easily upgradeable, and I've managed to install the hard drive and
    > > > CDRW from my old PC into this one.

    > >
    > > Hold the phone...you have a P3-550 CPU in there? I was told that for
    > > whatever reason, this machine was not P3 upgradeable. Mine has the
    > > "stock" Intel Pentium II-300 CPU in there. Does anyone know about this?
    > > Arny? I really don't know about PCs. I thought that the chip was
    > > physically unable to be fit in there if it was a P3. The PC is an
    > > IBM 300PL in case anyone is interested.
    > >
    > > Rob R.

    >
    >
  15. Arny Krueger

    Arny Krueger Guest

    "Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
    news:bj2gev$d20$1@bob.news.rcn.net

    > Ooops, my son just told me I'm wrong. Not that a PII and PIII are pin
    > compatible, but there obviously are some boards, particularly with
    > slot 1 that can accept either a PII or PIII.


    It's a tad more complex than that.

    AFAIK all P2 chips were packaged in a Slot-1 package (think about the
    familiar black plastic box with edge connector on the bottom), which has a
    consistent pinout. There were some bare unpackaged or partially-packaged
    versions that still had the same edge connector.

    Some P3s were packaged in Slot-1 packages, and some were packaged in PGA-370
    packages (more like the classic pin-socketed Pentium-1) I think some P3
    CPUs were even sold packaged either way.

    No matter, there were PGA-370 to slot-1 converters...

    Sorry you mentioned it, eh?

    ;-)

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