Pickup Recommendations for Gibson "The Paul"

Discussion in 'rec.music.guitar' started by Alexander Rehmer, Aug 17, 2003.

  1. Hi,

    i bought a used Gibson "The Paul" 1979 equipped with two OBL Humbuckers
    (A-900R in neck-position and A-900L in bridge-position). The guitar is made
    out of walnut and has an ebony fretboard. I want to change the humbuckers,
    because they are highly microphonic and sound muddy when playing higher
    gains (which occurs 70% of the time *g*). But I actually like the
    bridge-pickup "sound-spectrum-wise" (bass, mids and highs are well balanced
    for my liking) - the neck-pu is a little too dully.
    So I was thinking of replacing the bridge pickup with a Bill Lawrence L-500L
    (the question is, if it sounds somehow like the OBL, without being
    microphonic) or a Duncan SH-5 (Custom) and maybe a SH-2 (Jazz) in
    neck-position - or i'll go with EMG (85 in bridge and 60, 85 or 81 in
    neck-position). I want to have a punchy humbucker-sound in bridge-position
    that is not too shrill and a cleaner, brighter one in neck position. Does
    anyone of you have experience with walnut wood used for electric guitars and
    is able to tell me if these configurations are ok? On SeymourDuncan's
    website I read, that walnut is comparable to maple, but I think the sound is
    in beetween maple and mahogany, so it's got nice mids and creamy bass, but
    not too much hi's - maybe someone can tell me if that is correct...

    Thanks a lot in advance :)
    Alexander Rehmer, Germany
  2. Bruce Morgen

    Bruce Morgen Guest

    It seems like BL's L-500
    would be a good choice.
    It's certainly about as
    immune from microphonics
    as a blade pickup can
    get -- which is more than
    I say for the many clones
    and bootlegs of it that
    are out there. Exactly
    which L-500 model will be
    best largely depends on
    the control values in the
    guitar. If the pots are
    250K or 300K, your choice
    of an L-500L is correct,
    but if the pots are 500K
    or higher the L-500XL
    would work well.

    I suggest you call BL
    directly during the west
    coast USA morning hours
    -- as you probably know,
    he speaks German and
    English equally well, and
    he's always very generous
    with his time and advice.
    His latest published
    phone number is 909-737-
    5853 -- I've heard he and
    Becky have *finally*
    moved into their new
    headquarters just across
    the railroad tracks from
    Fender, but that number
    should still get through
    to them.

    "Alexander Rehmer" <safareme@t-online.de> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >i bought a used Gibson "The Paul" 1979 equipped with two OBL Humbuckers
    >(A-900R in neck-position and A-900L in bridge-position). The guitar is made
    >out of walnut and has an ebony fretboard. I want to change the humbuckers,
    >because they are highly microphonic and sound muddy when playing higher
    >gains (which occurs 70% of the time *g*). But I actually like the
    >bridge-pickup "sound-spectrum-wise" (bass, mids and highs are well balanced
    >for my liking) - the neck-pu is a little too dully.
    >So I was thinking of replacing the bridge pickup with a Bill Lawrence L-500L
    >(the question is, if it sounds somehow like the OBL, without being
    >microphonic) or a Duncan SH-5 (Custom) and maybe a SH-2 (Jazz) in
    >neck-position - or i'll go with EMG (85 in bridge and 60, 85 or 81 in
    >neck-position). I want to have a punchy humbucker-sound in bridge-position
    >that is not too shrill and a cleaner, brighter one in neck position. Does
    >anyone of you have experience with walnut wood used for electric guitars and
    >is able to tell me if these configurations are ok? On SeymourDuncan's
    >website I read, that walnut is comparable to maple, but I think the sound is
    >in beetween maple and mahogany, so it's got nice mids and creamy bass, but
    >not too much hi's - maybe someone can tell me if that is correct...
    >
    >Thanks a lot in advance :)
    >Alexander Rehmer, Germany
    >


    Disclaimer: I occasionally
    consult with William
    Lawrence Designs (Wilde),
    dba "Bill Lawrence Guitars"

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