Power outage

Discussion in 'rec.audio.pro' started by Don Cooper, Aug 14, 2003.

  1. Scott Dorsey wrote:

    > Arny Krueger <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote:
    >
    >> The big pluses I see for these generator-inverter sets is their low noise
    >> and increased fuel efficiency. Freeing generators from the need to run at a
    >> fixed speed for a given output frequency seems to provide lots of dividends.
    >> The requirement was just waiting on the right technology at the right price.

    >
    >
    > It occurs to me that I have a spare weedeater engine and a 100W inverter
    > sitting around in my garage, along with an alternator from a VW bug. Are
    > you thinking what I'm thinking?


    http://www.colemanpowermate.com/generators/pmg201102.shtml (no inverter
    but getting towards the right architecture, and has decent 12V output as
    well.)
  2. Arny Krueger <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote:

    > The worst fly I see in the ointment is the VW bug generator. My son had one
    > in his campmobile that just didn't last, but had to be rebuilt again and
    > again. It seems like an alternator from a more modern vehicle, probably one
    > with a built-in regulator, would be preferable. Then, add a small battery
    > for short-term surges. Automatic throttle control for the engine seems like
    > it could take some work.


    I would think the battery would eliminate the need for the automagic
    throttle control. At least in theory. If the battery has adequate
    capacity, the engine could idle along at a moderate speed regardless of
    the momentary load. This has the potential for being far more fuel
    efficient than if it has to constantly adjust.

    ulysses
  3. Scott Dorsey

    Scott Dorsey Guest

    In article <270820030740477244%ulysses@rollmusic.com>,
    Justin Ulysses Morse <ulysses@rollmusic.com> wrote:
    >Arny Krueger <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote:
    >
    >> The worst fly I see in the ointment is the VW bug generator. My son had one
    >> in his campmobile that just didn't last, but had to be rebuilt again and
    >> again. It seems like an alternator from a more modern vehicle, probably one
    >> with a built-in regulator, would be preferable. Then, add a small battery
    >> for short-term surges. Automatic throttle control for the engine seems like
    >> it could take some work.

    >
    >I would think the battery would eliminate the need for the automagic
    >throttle control. At least in theory. If the battery has adequate
    >capacity, the engine could idle along at a moderate speed regardless of
    >the momentary load. This has the potential for being far more fuel
    >efficient than if it has to constantly adjust.


    Yes, but it adds considerably to the weight.

    I used to have a Studebaker Cyclone generator, which had a bunch of reeds
    tuned above and below 60 Hz, excited by the generator output. They would
    open and close valves that directed varying amounts of engine vacuum to
    little pneumatic cylinders that adjusted the throttle to keep the engine
    speed constant. It sometimes took ten or fifteen seconds to settle down
    after a substantial change in load. I kept meaning to actually measure
    everything and plot the poles and zeros out, but after the magneto went
    open in the ice storm five years ago, I gave up and donated it to a bunch
    of WWII re-enactors....
    --scott
    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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