Preparing a File for Live Performance

Discussion in 'General Sequencing' started by Nigel Mulvey, Jun 12, 2004.

  1. Nigel Mulvey

    Nigel Mulvey New Member

    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    What is the best way to get an average sounding midi file into shape for live performance? Sometimes you find a file that has been played well but is all over the place in terms of sounds and volumes. Where should one start to try and pull it into shape?
  2. kuerbo

    kuerbo New Member

    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Well, it depends on what foftware or hardware you are going to use... But, you can adjust almost every little aspect of the song with a good sequencer,like, let's say Cubase SX...
  3. Cowsgom00000

    Cowsgom00000 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Use Vanbasko's Kareoke Player, and play it on the piano.
  4. voice of god

    voice of god Prodigal Pyjamas Pervert Staff Member Super Mod

    Messages:
    5,830
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    start with a midi editing program. Like cubase or logic or cakewalk or any type of midi editing program.

    From there you have to adjust the volume of instruments and the velocity (how hard its played ) of the individual notes

    thats where you should start
  5. jeaniesing

    jeaniesing Super Moderator Staff Member Super Mod

    Messages:
    15,082
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    remembering, of course, that your computers speakers and your sound system might not share the same qualities.... after a while you'll get used to what you need for the big system.... but trial and error is a tough way to start your first gig...
  6. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

    Messages:
    980
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I think jeaniesing has touched on the main point - but didn't follow it through. Given that you have the software (and the knowledge) to make the changes, the most important thing is the sound system you are using.

    You should really use the live rig to monitor any changes you are making - anything else is bound to get you into trouble until you are very experienced. If you're playing a regular gig, then do it at the venue, if possible - that way you can also eliminate any problems introduced by the room itself. Also, try to listen at realistic (live) playing levels, not living room ones.

    I realise this is a real PITA to do it this way, but it's certainly worth the effort.
  7. songer

    songer New Member

    Messages:
    182
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    you should also test your files in the venue itself... some musicians wasted their time editing songs, just to discover that some instruments don't sound like you want them to be...
  8. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

    Messages:
    980
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Didn't I just say that?
  9. kuerbo

    kuerbo New Member

    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You could also record the whole thing, then do the mix, and export the final result to an audio file, automation and all but without the prats you play or sing.
  10. songer

    songer New Member

    Messages:
    182
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    graeme... yeah... i just noticed now... hehehe! sorry!

Share This Page