Question about audio recording

Discussion in 'Digital Audio & Recording' started by DarthNathan, Aug 19, 2004.

  1. DarthNathan

    DarthNathan New Member

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    Hey everyone,

    I am looking to start recording some of my own playing - mostly guitar and vocals. I was wondering if anyone knew of a program that allowed for overdubbing - like adding multiple tracks. Obviously I'd like to sing some of my own harmonies and play multiple parts on guitar - so I'm looking for a simple to use recording program that would allow 'multiple takes' and tracks, much like if I were writing midi files.

    Any help is much appreciated.

    Also, does anyone have any suggestions on good microphones?
  2. Bladez26

    Bladez26 New Member

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    Depends on your budget really, I use Sonar for both Midi and audio, (i play guitar and sing as well). but that may be a bit pricey.
    Friends of mine use cubase, again at a cost.

    As far as microphones go I found that is really a personal choice, much like my guitars, if you can get somewhere and try some and compare, in the recording sense it's hard. I like the Audio Technica range for performing, then there is the industry standard SM58 by Sure. Recording wise you can spend a lot of money. Rode for example.
    One thing I have found is that there are some good vst/dxi plugins for Sonar/Cubase for mic modelling that work really well.

    Hope that helps a bit
  3. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

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    For purely audio multitrack recording, then Adobe Audition (was Cool Edit Pro) is, without a doubt, the best 'bang for the buck' on the market.

    At $299, it's not particularly cheap, but it does have a huge range of built-in FX and other tools. If that's not enough, it will also host DX and VST plug-ins.

    As far as microphones are concerned, the choice is huge! For vocals, go for a large diameter (1") capacitor mic. Really top notch ones cost a small fortune, but there are several respectable and affodarble Chinese copies around. I know that Bladez26 implied that Rode are expensive, but they are really very cheap compared to many of the others and are good value for money.

    For guitar, you don't say if you mean electric or acoustic, so it's not easy to advise on that. For acoustics, you'll probably get away wwith the same mic as you use for vocals. For electric, then you might be able to use a cheaper dynamic type. Also, for electric guitar, many people simply use a modelling pre-amp straight into the record chain and avoid using a mic altogether.
  4. Charmez

    Charmez New Member

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    Just hijacking your thread, DarthNathan - I am also interested in recording my music (gutiar and vocals) but know NOTHING about what equipment to buy to record onto PC... so you guys are practically speaking another language to me!! Is there a good online store you can recommend that sells all the stuff you would need? I am just completely unaware as to where to begin.
  5. XXX_Mina

    XXX_Mina New Member

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    what about hardware??? i got a Sound Blaster Audigy 2 thats perfect for that stuff... my friend has the same thing and he used it to turn his closet into a sound studio ... he sound proofed it and put a microphone in it... it also comes with software thats perfect for what you want... but some of it is only demo... just check it out next time your in a computer store... i got mine for about $150.

    Mina
  6. MCastille84

    MCastille84 New Member

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    I prefer CakeWalk and Cool edit Pro is pretty cool. I use a DigiDesign MBox with ProTools software. I'm not a big fan of ProTools though. The MBox is pretty cool. It has two inputs (XLR or 1/4") and 2 outputs, and connects via USB to your computer.

    SM58 are great microphones, as stated above they are the industry's standard. And unless you are in a $500,000 professional studio recording a multi-platinum CD, a 58 will do just fine.
  7. camealy

    camealy New Member

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    I have much better luck with Turtle Beach sounds cards than with the Sound Blaster.
  8. shorts

    shorts Member

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    I like Sonar or Nuendo for pure multitrack.... fall towards Sonar for Midi...
  9. Stewpot

    Stewpot New Member

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    You can't really go wrong with sonar and cool edit. They both provide good recording, mixing and mastering tools.
    Go for a 24 bit soundcard though as procssing affects your bit rate.
  10. zeubest

    zeubest New Member

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    You can use sonar, logic audio, cubase : all recent sequencers are easy to use and allow multitrack works.

    The main hardware problem, for cheap systems, will be latency.

    And there's no much to do if your hardware is too "basic". So, to start from ground, try all the softwares (sonar, logic audio, cubase ) to "feel" the one you prefer. Technically, there's no big differences. Then, according to it, improve your hardware, if needed.

    To record your great hits, ;) use Sound Forge : there's a huge amount of plugins available and it's a great program !


    :thumbsup:
  11. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

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    No it doesn't - however, heavy processing of 16 bit audio will introduce rounding errors as the software does the mathematics - and that can affect the sound. However, the end file is still 16 bit.

    Even so, there's no real need to start with 24 bit files - particularly at beginners level - depending on the software you use, you can convert a 16 bit file to 32 bit, do all your processing and then re-sample back to 16 bit for transfer to CD.
  12. johnrowley

    johnrowley Member

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    Use SB Audigy with the breakout module so that you can plug mic/gtr and midi in it. I use Cubase which allows you to over dub and record various audio and add effects. Output through a mixing desk for monitoring and mixing. Works well. Spec on computer is only win98 with 512 mb memory running 1Ghz athlon.
  13. CyberCat

    CyberCat Active Member

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  14. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

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    Since DarthNathan seems to be primarily concerned with recording and multitracking audio, he would be well advised to avoid any card from Creative Labs (Sound Blaster et al). These all have serious shortcomings when used purely as audio devices (although their midi capabilities, particularly Soundfont handling, can be useful.
  15. CyberCat

    CyberCat Active Member

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    Although they perhaps might not have the audio quality you want, some people do find their cards useful for other reasons. (although I'd agree that they probably aren't the "professional" choice)
  16. Zandro

    Zandro New Member

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    Surely, they are nifty little cards for gamers on a relative budget. New SBLive! cards are going on eBay for just $10USD. :p
  17. CyberCat

    CyberCat Active Member

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    :jawdrop: That's not fair, I bought one several years back when they where new, and I think I had to pay about $150 for it.
  18. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

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    Which goes to demonstrate two truths;

    1 - If you're the sort of person who buys the latest 'toy', expect it to devalue considerably over the next few years.

    2 - Good equipment holds its value much better.

    I paid around $500 for my soundcard some six years ago. Today, a new one still costs the same money. Although cheaper in real terms (through devaluation) it demonstrates just how something, which is much better than the average offering on the market, can still maintain its value against all the newer and cheaper offerings which exist today.
  19. CyberCat

    CyberCat Active Member

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    What sound card do you have?
  20. Zandro

    Zandro New Member

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