Re: Digital Compact Cassette - how do you modify an analogue tape to record

Discussion in 'rec.audio.pro' started by Mike Rivers, Sep 1, 2003.

  1. Mike Rivers

    Mike Rivers Guest

    In article <94e7a5c44997e56660473136c0c6a8b0@unlimited.ultrafeed.com> arb226@earthlink.net writes:

    > I have a DCC (digital compact cassette) recorder and I wanna know how
    > to modify an analogue cassette to record on my deck?


    You can't. It requires a special digital tape in order to record
    digitally. They built it so that you could play an analog cassette for
    convenience, but that's about as far as you can go.

    If you didn't stock up on digital cassettes when they were still
    available, you have a set of mediocre A/D converters, that's about it.



    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
  2. vaathe

    vaathe Guest

    mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers) wrote in message news:<znr1062382986k@trad>...
    > In article <94e7a5c44997e56660473136c0c6a8b0@unlimited.ultrafeed.com> arb226@earthlink.net writes:
    >
    > > I have a DCC (digital compact cassette) recorder and I wanna know how
    > > to modify an analogue cassette to record on my deck?

    >
    > You can't. It requires a special digital tape in order to record
    > digitally. They built it so that you could play an analog cassette for
    > convenience, but that's about as far as you can go.
    >
    > If you didn't stock up on digital cassettes when they were still
    > available, you have a set of mediocre A/D converters, that's about it.



    I'm not sure about all models, but it works with DCC170 and DCC175
    (the 18bit-portables), with a TDK SA100 analog tape:

    Just look at the little holes in a DCC-tape when it's NOT
    record-protected (with the red slide-thing) and then drill them in an
    analog tape on exactly the same place. Probably requires some
    experimenting, but it works for me.

    Mediocre A/D converters? Let me know how to find this out, I'm not a
    recording-pro (just a professional cathedralorganist).
  3. vaathe <hvaatstr@netscape.net> wrote:

    > Mediocre A/D converters? Let me know how to find this out, I'm not a
    > recording-pro (just a professional cathedralorganist).


    Determine the date of manufacture of the DCC machine. If it's more
    than 5 years old, and if it's a consumer machine, then it has some
    pretty obsolete converters in it. Since DCC is a consumer format and
    they haven't been made in over 5 years, it would be a safe bet that the
    converters in it aren't great. Not to mention the (5-year-old) lossy
    data compression.

    ulysses
  4. Mike Rivers

    Mike Rivers Guest

    In article <010920031900436217%ulysses@rollmusic.com> ulysses@rollmusic.com writes:

    > vaathe <hvaatstr@netscape.net> wrote:
    >
    > > Mediocre A/D converters? Let me know how to find this out, I'm not a
    > > recording-pro (just a professional cathedralorganist).

    >
    > Determine the date of manufacture of the DCC machine. If it's more
    > than 5 years old, and if it's a consumer machine, then it has some
    > pretty obsolete converters in it.


    That's why I said "mediocre" converters. But I remember that near the
    end of the DCC's short life, people were buying them for a quarter the
    price of an outboard A/D converter of the day and using them as a
    system upgrade. I guess there's a way to put it into Record without a
    tape and in that mode you get a digital output. I used to use my DAT
    in that mode until I got a better A/D converter (which I now use as a
    front end to the DAT).




    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
  5. Mike Rivers <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:

    > That's why I said "mediocre" converters. But I remember that near the
    > end of the DCC's short life, people were buying them for a quarter the
    > price of an outboard A/D converter of the day and using them as a
    > system upgrade. I guess there's a way to put it into Record without a
    > tape and in that mode you get a digital output. I used to use my DAT
    > in that mode until I got a better A/D converter (which I now use as a
    > front end to the DAT).


    Right, I was one of the guys who did that around the end of 1997. But
    it was only an "upgrade" because all I had besides that were the
    onboard converters on my AudioMediaII card, and J&L was blowing out DCC
    machines for $99. So it seemed like a good idea at the time. My
    partner bought a DAT machine about a month later, so I only ever mixed
    one album through the DCC. We used the DAT machine the same way,
    rarely actually printing anything to tape, for a while until we bought
    some relatively cheap, but better, outboard converters. Even the
    "obsolete" Symetrix 620 or Lucid ADA1000 does better now and costs very
    little. So there's no reason I can see in the 21st century to use
    either DAT or DCC as a stopgap converter. The converters built into a
    lot of soundcards today have performance that easily beats those, and
    for less money.

    My advice to the OP: Sell the DCC on Ebay. Some clown will probably
    give you a Benjamin for it. Take that money and buy an M-Audio 9624
    card (steet about $109 these days, I think). It's easy to find a
    350MHz Pentium II machine for free these days, and people are paying to
    get rid of decent CRTs lately too. Download whatever Adobe Audition is
    calling Cool Edit's freeware version, and suddenly you have yourself a
    real, nearly-state-of-the-art 2-track digital recorder without
    investing more than a few dollars above the DCC. And sound quality
    just went through the roof (compared to the lossy, "vintage digital"
    performance of the DCC, that is).

    ulysses

Share This Page