Re: Roland A-33 midi keyboard -> e-piano

Discussion in 'comp.music.midi' started by Rob, Sep 1, 2003.

  1. Rob

    Rob Guest

    Foldenyi Tamas wrote:
    >
    > Hello,
    >
    > I've got a Roland A-33 midi keyboard, and I want to use it as an
    > e-piano. Previously it was used with a Gravis Ultrasound PnP, but I
    > cannot plug it in into my new machine, so I cannot use it anymore. I
    > would like to know my possibilites. My new computer has usb ports,
    > game port (my Gravis Midi Adapter was connected to it), and an


    I still use my Gravis adaptor ... no problems.
    Check your BIOS has enabled the MIDI port ...

    In your software choose MPU401 for input

    I expect you will have a "software synthesiser" as one of you MIDI
    output options (which will play from the soundcard). Try that for
    output.

    if not, google around for either the Roland or Yamaha software synths.

    You may wish to spend lots of money and go for the high end soft synths.
    Very good, and have minimal latency (the time taken from pressing a key
    on
    the A33 to when you get a sound!)

    > integrated (low quality) sound card. I hope there is some kind of
    > driver that creates midi input port, and there is a sowfter based midi
    > out port that gives the wave to my soundcard. (The currect midi tones
    > sound very bad)
    >
    > I'm interested in other soulutions too, that could omit the computer.


    For good live, zero latency sound you can buy any sound module, but a
    Roland SC80 or similar will be good (great!). These take midi in (of
    course) and
    have audio out. You can use software to control them too!

    Lots of options, some mean you spend money, some none at all!!!

    bye

    >--

    Rob Fletcher, University of York, UK
    [Spamtrap - Remove the "y" to reply]
  2. On 1 Sep 2003 01:21:39 -0700, ftomi@1982.hu (Foldenyi Tamas) wrote:

    >Hello,
    >
    >I've got a Roland A-33 midi keyboard, and I want to use it as an
    >e-piano. Previously it was used with a Gravis Ultrasound PnP, but I
    >cannot plug it in into my new machine, so I cannot use it anymore. I
    >would like to know my possibilites. My new computer has usb ports,
    >game port (my Gravis Midi Adapter was connected to it), and an
    >integrated (low quality) sound card. I hope there is some kind of
    >driver that creates midi input port, and there is a sowfter based midi
    >out port that gives the wave to my soundcard. (The currect midi tones
    >sound very bad)
    >
    >I'm interested in other soulutions too, that could omit the computer.


    Omitting the computer, get a hardware sound module -- a standalone
    synth in a small box.

    On the computer: check to see if the computer has a MPU-401 or
    External MIDI port listed among its MIDI devices. If not, check in
    the BIOS set up to see if it is disabled, then enable it and let the
    OS install it.

    For a new PC, I'm guessing it runs Windows XP and uses the Microsoft
    GS Software Synth as its MIDI output device. That is a software
    synth, and its sound quality is moderately good but not excellent.

    As it has a game port, it is likely that it also supports a MIDI
    connection on that port, but there are a few motherboard designs which
    don't do that. You can always get a USB midi port adapter and use
    that instead.

    There are a *lot* of software synths, but the really good ones
    require a host sequencer program in order to use them. Cakewalk and
    Cubase -- current Sonar and SX versions -- come with software synths
    included.

    But using a software synth for all channels can be a little tricky.
    Roland's VSC DXi can work well for that, with fairly low CPU use.
    Other synths will tend to use more CPU power and ram. You can use a
    soundfont/sample playing software synth to handle a wide range of
    sound options.

    The latency of the built-in sound card will limit your ability to
    use the softsynths for live playing. Typical delays on low end sond
    cards with WDM drivers are about 30ms -- enough to notice the lag, but
    not so bad as to be unplayable. You do need to adjust settings on
    them (some adjust with the host program for all software synths) to
    get a fast response.

    It is a bit more complicated using softwares synths than working
    with hardware, but the options are greater. Of course, it also means
    you can spend more money and time trying out them as well.
    --
    *-__Jeffery Jones__________| *Starfire* |____________________-*
    ** Muskego WI Access Channel 14/25 <http://www.execpc.com/~jeffsj/mach7/>
    *Starfire Design Studio* <http://www.starfiredesign.com/>

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