Re: Steely Dan, "Everything Must Go" (and Fleetwood Mac "Say You Will")

Discussion in 'rec.audio.pro' started by Chad Clark, Aug 25, 2003.

  1. Chad Clark

    Chad Clark Guest

    One thing I find curious phenomenon --- not that I have given it much
    thought --- is famous rock bands who made textbook "warm" analog
    recordings in the '70s who reunite, ostensibly with massive budgets,
    only to make exceedingly shrill and Digi001-sounding comeback records.

    These are people whose earlier work became a benchmark of a sort for a
    certain kind of aesthetic. And they seem to shun these achievements
    entirely when they re-open the shop.

    The two I'm thinking of are:

    [A] Fleetwood Mac (Try playing "Rumours" and following that listening
    session with "Say You Will." Try it. I'm an admirer of Lindsay
    Buckingham --- the Brian Wilson figure of the band, a gifted eccentric
    --- but seriously, what were they thinking?)

    and

    Steely Dan (Play a recent remastering of "Any Major Dude" or
    similar period Steely Dan piece and then play "Two Against Nature" or
    "Everything Must Go." We're not talking about a subtle fall from
    grace here. Yes, to some extent the tools they choose and the
    arrangements/aesthetics have shifted. But the general sound of the
    audio makes you wonder --- and this sad notion has crossed my mind ---
    if the people involved are possibly losing their hearing? I mean,
    it's a medical fact, it does happen to many men as they get older.

    Or is it, as seems more likely to be the case, people who have
    simply... lost their touch?

    I'm not trying to be mean or age-ist at all. In fact, generally I'm
    an advocate that great musical artists get better and braver and
    cooler as they grow older (Tom Waits, Beastie Boys, Los Lobos, Ron
    Carter, Paul Simon, Fugazi, Elvis Costello, Sonny Rollins, etc. etc.).

    The truth is neither Fleetwood Mac nor Steely Dan are that much a part
    of my musical life for me to really be all that upset about it.

    It's just a curiosity, I guess.

    --- Chad
  2. "Chad Clark" <chad@beautypill.com> wrote in message
    news:b8ad7fc0.0308250856.33edd288@posting.google.com...
    > One thing I find curious phenomenon --- not that I have given it much
    > thought --- is famous rock bands who made textbook "warm" analog
    > recordings in the '70s who reunite, ostensibly with massive budgets,
    > only to make exceedingly shrill and Digi001-sounding comeback records.


    My hypothesis is due to years of playing at extremely high levels that
    probably can't hear the shrill highend.
  3. Roger

    Roger Guest

    In article <CnO2b.267657$YN5.182199@sccrnsc01>, "Ricky W. Hunt"
    <rickywhunt@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > "Chad Clark" <chad@beautypill.com> wrote in message
    > news:b8ad7fc0.0308250856.33edd288@posting.google.com...
    > > One thing I find curious phenomenon --- not that I have given it much
    > > thought --- is famous rock bands who made textbook "warm" analog
    > > recordings in the '70s who reunite, ostensibly with massive budgets,
    > > only to make exceedingly shrill and Digi001-sounding comeback records.

    >
    > My hypothesis is due to years of playing at extremely high levels that
    > probably can't hear the shrill highend.


    I doubt the artists had much to do with it in either case; just going
    along with the current state of the art in both cases.

    rog

Share This Page