Reading music (Jamie Glaser) Ponty, Corea

Discussion in 'rec.music.guitar' started by Jamie Glaser, Sep 1, 2003.

  1. Jamie Glaser

    Jamie Glaser Guest

    Hi
    I've seen a lot of mention about the art of reading music. i agree
    with many it's easy and fun.

    There's a greatness about "ear " players, but while they are spending
    hours learning something,,those of us readers can get through a whole
    book of amazing music of our choice.

    I remember my years at Berklee 1973-1977. there was a school of
    thought among Rock and even classical musicians that if you read well,
    you were probably stiff, and insensitive. I can tell you from the
    great studio people I've been blessed to work with ,,that sure isn't
    true. the funny thing is that the people that felt that way about
    reading, mostly band people, are doing some day job now. (which of
    course theres nothing wrong with).

    There are tricks to learn how to read better. Simple ones like using
    the imaginary barline, seeing the wave of the music, using the lines
    and spaces to spot shapes (harmonies) even when you don'thave time to
    name them. And there are more.

    I myself took the Evelyn Woods speed reading course for words and
    applied the principles to reading music.

    If I can help you , don't hesitate to write!!

    jamie Glaser
    www.jamieglaser.com
  2. Hey,

    Thanks for posting about reading. I'm a pretty decent reader, having played
    in big bands, shows, etc. I'd still love to be able to sight-read Coltrane
    and Bird solos but it seems to be something I've never quite been able to
    do. I have the chops to play those solos so that's not a problem and I can
    sight-read the solos at reduced tempos but have never quite gotten the sight
    reading chops to read those kinds of lines up to speed. I don't know if you
    remember Jim Roberts from your years at Berklee. He mentioned you quite a
    bit. Jim plays guitar in the Army Blues. Jim is absolutely the best reader
    on guitar I've ever met. I remember him sight-reading Coltrane's solos from
    Giant Steps after I purchased them from Andrew White, years ago.

    I've often thought about applying Evelyn Woods techniques to reading but
    never got around to it.

    Jaz
    www.jackzucker.com/JazGuitar

    P.S.

    Dan Hovey used to speak fondly of you too...



    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Jamie Glaser" <jglaser333@aol.com>
    Newsgroups: rec.music.makers.guitar
    Sent: Monday, September 01, 2003 8:56 AM
    Subject: Reading music (Jamie Glaser) Ponty, Corea


    > Hi
    > I've seen a lot of mention about the art of reading music. i agree
    > with many it's easy and fun.
    >
    > There's a greatness about "ear " players, but while they are spending
    > hours learning something,,those of us readers can get through a whole
    > book of amazing music of our choice.
    >
    > I remember my years at Berklee 1973-1977. there was a school of
    > thought among Rock and even classical musicians that if you read well,
    > you were probably stiff, and insensitive. I can tell you from the
    > great studio people I've been blessed to work with ,,that sure isn't
    > true. the funny thing is that the people that felt that way about
    > reading, mostly band people, are doing some day job now. (which of
    > course theres nothing wrong with).
    >
    > There are tricks to learn how to read better. Simple ones like using
    > the imaginary barline, seeing the wave of the music, using the lines
    > and spaces to spot shapes (harmonies) even when you don'thave time to
    > name them. And there are more.
    >
    > I myself took the Evelyn Woods speed reading course for words and
    > applied the principles to reading music.
    >
    > If I can help you , don't hesitate to write!!
    >
    > jamie Glaser
    > www.jamieglaser.com

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