Removing Vocals from an Audio File

Discussion in 'Digital Audio & Recording' started by willglen, Sep 29, 2002.

  1. DORUMALAIA

    DORUMALAIA New Member

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    Because many of you ask about this , i try to help you :

    YoGenVocalRemover1.07
    http://www.yogen.com/vocalremover/

    VogoneVocalEliminationWorkstationv2.014
    http://www.mtu.com/basics/vocal-eliminator.htm

    AnalogX Vocal Remover (DX) v1.00
    http://www.analogx.com/contents/dow...io/vremover.htm

    AnalogX Vocal Remover (Winamp) v1.03
    http://www.analogx.com/contents/dow...io/vremover.htm

    Very useful can be and :

    AnwidaSoft GEQ31V VST v1.1
    http://www.anwida.com/geq31v.asp

    TC.Works.Native.Bundle.v3.0.VST (Graphic EQ and Parametric EQ)
    http://www.tcworks.de/home/content/...come/render_top


    Unfortunately , in many cases , removing vocals , you 'll remove and some frequences from orchestration , but must to try ,with patience , the results are different in each case !

    I hope this 'll be useful to you !

    Doru Malaia
    composer
    http://www.freewebs.com/dorumalaia
    compozi@yahoo.com
  2. madfiddler

    madfiddler New Member

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    The way most of these plugins work, is to reverse the phase of one channel, and mix back in. Anything that is dead central in the mix, will be removed. However, anything else dead central will also be removed.

    Also, if the vocal has been processed, say by a stereo reverb, this will remain in the mix, even if the central vocal part has been "erased".
  3. dagoodnookie

    dagoodnookie New Member

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    just so you know this thread may go on forever because there are many ways to do this, but it also depends on the quality and the type of file you're trying to remove the vocals from. Cool Edit, a program I saw listed in someone else's reply does do this job quite well. Then depending on the size and your budget for your studio or workstation there are many devices that make this possible, and personally since I work with Protools you try it. Any and everything you want to do it can do just make sure you have the right plug-in. Im going to e-mail you later the name of the peice of equippent that does this quick and efficiently.
  4. BCC

    BCC New Member

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    Compression can also be helpfull here. If you set up your compressor correctly yoou can also get good results, but as said before, there is no perfect sollution.
  5. tricky83

    tricky83 New Member

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    Yes, I believe Cool Edit Pro 2 is the best program for this - use the vocal cut option. However, like so many other people have said it does remove other things leaving you with a poor quality file, however, it depends why you want to remove the vocals as to whether this will affect you.
  6. vytal

    vytal New Member

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    YoGen works the best but you have to pay for it.
  7. clubV2

    clubV2 New Member

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    take the file into a wav editor an take one track (left or right not both) and reverse the phase. this will eliminate the center of the mix. where most of the vox are usually found..

    those win amp plug ins do exactly that.
  8. wgk

    wgk New Member

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    Using SONAR, you can reverse phase on one or the other channel

    Try this:
    Paste stereo audio file into a track.
    Duplicate that track.
    In the console view, pan stereo track 1 to the right, stereo track 2 to the left
    Reverse the phase of track 2
    in the output channel, press the MONO button.

    This works and sounds very similar to the other methods described.
  9. VenagE

    VenagE All that Jelly , No ToasT

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    I use cool edit pro 2 ...

    extract audio from a file , pretty nice to start an acapella ....
    except that i don't know how to use the

    vocal remove options ... but CEpro2 does it all :)
  10. crimson_ou

    crimson_ou New Member

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    yeah....

    GREAT lil program there
  11. Scorcha

    Scorcha New Member

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    You can, if the vocals are paneed to one side of speakers and the instrumental is on the other end, but I would search for vinyls or instrumentals.
  12. megadeth1979

    megadeth1979 New Member

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    All of the songs that I have heard that had the vocals removed from them, makes the song sound weird, like you can still hear the effects on the voice, and the guitar gets louder or something, try this...PLug in headphones and listen to a song, but don't push the jack all the way in, about 1/2 way...sometimes this takes vocals out :) Seriosly
  13. dived motion

    dived motion New Member

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    You can use Celemony's Melodyne.
  14. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

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    As has already been discussed, this is a tricky thing to do and the results are extremely variable. The basic technique involved (adding together out of phase tracks) is something you can do with almost any .wav editor on the market - how well it will work depends on the source material.

    However, if you want to hear some really clever stuff, have a listen to the sample tracks here;

    http://www.csp-audio.com/vocalremoval.htm

    I have absolutely no idea how they do this (and they are certainly not going to tell any of us) but the results are quite remarkable.
  15. bballermarcu

    bballermarcu New Member

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    its kinda impossible to remove em
  16. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

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    I'm the first person to say this is an almost impossible task, the results vary considerably and it screws up the sound, etc., etc. However, for those who are interested in this subject, have a listen to the examples on this site - http://www.csp-audio.com/vocalremoval.htm .

    Some of this is truly amazing - especially the old mono tracks, which I would have said were impossible! Don't ask me how they do it, I don't know and they ain't saying :) .
  17. Komplex

    Komplex New Member

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    Dont waste your time its pretty much impossible.
  18. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

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    You didn't listen to the link I gave, did you?
  19. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

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    OK - here's the basic technique for removing vocals - but your mileage will vary, dependent on many variables associated with the original track (which must be stereo to start with). It relies on the fact that most vocal tracks are centrally located on the sound stage - if they aren't, don't even bother trying it out.

    All these 'vocal cut applications work the same way. You can do it manually, using a wave editor such as CoolEdit Pro, or you can rely on some other bit of kit which does all the steps automatically - but the end result is the same, no matter what software you use.

    NOTE: You will need to convert any compressed format (MP3, RA, etc.) to a .wav format first.

    1 - Take a stereo file

    2 - Invert the phase of one channel

    3 - Add the two channels together

    That's it - that's all you do. Now for what happens.

    1 - Anything that was centre stage (hopefully, in this case, the vocal) will be cancelled out.

    2 - This includes the bass, kick drum and anything else that was also centre stage.

    3 - Material which is close, but not, centre stage will also reduce in level.

    4 - The end file will be mono.

    4 - On most modern recordings, FX returns are stereo or pseudo-stereo. Thus all the FX returns on the vocal will still be heard.


    The truth of the matter is that you can, perhaps, on some recordings, reduce the vocal level. Whether or not you can reduce it enough is only discovered by trying it out. You will still have to contend with the problems of other instruments which also vanish, the generally reduced bass level and the FX returns.

    Now, because your resultant wave can sometimes suffer from center-channel dropouts of things like bass guitar and bass drum, here's something else that you can do 'after' you've run the vocal cut on a file.

    Open the original file (pre-vocal cut) and run a low-pass filter on it so that ONLY frequencies below 200Hz are retained (effectively cutting everything above 200Hz). This will leave you with a stereo waveform that has possibly 'some' vocal element, but will primarily carry the bass and bass frequencies.

    Now, add the 'low-pass' file to the 'vocal cut' version, time aligning the two. Play with the levels to achieve a proper balance. This will allow you to restore a bit of the stereo image (if needed) as well as improve some of the low-end response.

    However, the general answer is you will not be able to do this to any effective degree unless you are extremely lucky in your choice of original recording.
  20. PERFECTiON

    PERFECTiON New Member

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    I'm gonna try Goldwave!

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