Simple Approach to CD Labeling

Discussion in 'rec.audio.pro' started by Mike Rivers, Aug 20, 2003.

  1. ryanm

    ryanm Guest

    "Justin Ulysses Morse" <ulysses@rollmusic.com> wrote in message
    news:210820030330474947%ulysses@rollmusic.com...
    >
    > I use Quark Xpress.
    >

    There are templates available for Quark for cds as well as dvd cases.
    Quark is neither cheap or simple to use, but it is very useful once you get
    used to it. You can print anything from mailing labels to billboards with it
    and it is accurate with both sizing and colors.

    ryanm
  2. Mike Rivers

    Mike Rivers Guest

    In article <WFT0b.795292$3C2.17990921@news3.calgary.shaw.ca> alternate-root@shaw.ca writes:


    > For about $80 dollars you can get a small CD printer that will print right
    > on your CDs no more stickers.


    I guess you just had this on your mind and didn't read my message.
    Stickers aren't the problem, getting the text in the right place on
    the page, or the CD, is.



    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
  3. Troy

    Troy Guest

    Yes......but it comes with simple software.This puts the text in the right
    spots on the CD......and I did read your post.If you can't figure out the CD
    stomper software then I don't know what to tell you.That is probably the
    most basic CD program out there for the average home user.I don't mean this
    as an insult either.


    Mike Rivers <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
    news:znr1061426684k@trad...
    >
    > In article <WFT0b.795292$3C2.17990921@news3.calgary.shaw.ca>

    alternate-root@shaw.ca writes:
    >
    >
    > > For about $80 dollars you can get a small CD printer that will print

    right
    > > on your CDs no more stickers.

    >
    > I guess you just had this on your mind and didn't read my message.
    > Stickers aren't the problem, getting the text in the right place on
    > the page, or the CD, is.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
  4. Mike Rivers

    Mike Rivers Guest

    In article <3f42c80f_2@newsfeed> tbowen@dwntwn.com writes:

    > you should look into the Casio CW-50 CD printer. It does a great job of
    > printing on CDs and looks like an expenvie silk screen. Software is a
    > little klunky


    I don't have a problem with printing, and I just want something that's
    easier to read than my writing with a felt tip pen. It's the klunky
    software, and the software designer's concept that I want a fancy
    lable that gives me heartburn. I don't even want to waste the ink that
    it takes to print a fancy background. (did I also mention that I'm a
    cheapskate?)

    The Casio printer looks pretty sleazy, and with the cost of the labels
    and ink, it amounts to not much less than a buck a disk. Then there's
    the desk space for another printer that I might use once or twice a
    month.

    Sorry, you don't win the vacation in Vegas this time.


    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
  5. Mike Rivers

    Mike Rivers Guest

    In article <210820030330474947%ulysses@rollmusic.com> ulysses@rollmusic.com writes:

    > I take work all the time that I don't know how to do. I don't charge
    > clients for the time it takes me to learn how to do what they hired me
    > to do. I consider it free education. I take the time to make sure I
    > do it right, then the next time I get a similar job I'm prepared.


    That's a healthy attitude, but at my age, by the time I get the next
    similar job, I've forgotten what I learned about how to do it the
    previous time.

    > I use Quark Xpress. It may be more complicated than the E-Z-Graf-Icks
    > programs that come with CD stompers. But it's intelligently laid out,
    > and here's the best part: I can use it for everything, which means I
    > know HOW to use it.


    This is why I was looking at something that I could use with Word. I
    use that every day. I don't even own a Mac, so that's a stumbling
    block with Quark.

    > It makes no sense to use 30 different specialized
    > applications for different jobs you want to do.


    I agree, but sometimes it's easier to use a specialized application
    that does one thing very well and very easily than to beat a
    generalized application into submission. If I wanted fancy artwork on
    a CD label, I'd give the job to an artist.

    > The first time you use it to make a CD
    > label, you get out your ruler and you make the measurements and
    > generate a good document. Then you save it to use as a template in the
    > future.


    Clearly I'm not the only person who has ever wanted to make a CD label
    with a given program. Why can't I benefit from someone else's work
    here and just get a template that works? Brian sent me a Word template
    for the back liner and it works just fine. Like so many questions that
    get posed here, everyone who doesn't agree with my concept of work
    flow tells me how THEY think I should be approaching the job. One
    person gave me a real answer that I can use, for which I'm thankful.

    > It's not hard, and since CDs and jewel cases are standardized
    > it'll be useful for a long time.


    Exactly my point. But maybe the concept of shareware has just gone out
    the window.



    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
  6. Jay Kadis

    Jay Kadis Guest

    In article <znr1061417547k@trad> mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers) writes:
    >
    > In article <bi0mau$c9q$1@news.Stanford.EDU> jay@ccrma.Stanford.EDU writes:
    >
    > > For more control, I use PageMaker. Once the templates are set up, it's

    very
    > > easy to use.

    >
    > Ack! Another program that's difficult to use (and expensive to buy).
    >
    >
    > --
    > I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)


    And it's also capable of delivering pre-press for CD booklets and CD screen
    printing, not to mention page setting and .PDF production for course notes,
    books, etc. It pays for itself if you have the business.

    -Jay
    --
    x------- Jay Kadis ------- x---- Jay's Attic Studio ----x
    x Lecturer, Audio Engineer x Dexter Records x
    x CCRMA, Stanford University x http://www.offbeats.com/ x
    x-------- http://ccrma-www.stanford.edu/~jay/ ----------x
  7. What do they call that printer?

    Troy wrote:
    >>>For about $80 dollars you can get a small CD printer that will print
  8. Jay Levitt

    Jay Levitt Guest

    In article <znr1061464525k@trad>, mrivers@d-and-d.com says...
    > Like so many questions that
    > get posed here, everyone who doesn't agree with my concept of work
    > flow tells me how THEY think I should be approaching the job. One
    > person gave me a real answer that I can use, for which I'm thankful.


    Geez, Mike, what kind of engineer are you? I have to wonder about
    you... please take the following test.

    If you see a picture on the wall that is crooked, do you:

    (a) do nothing.

    (b) Straighten it.

    (c) Spend the next six months learning a high-end CAD/CAM system and
    buying a 3D printer so that you can design and fabricate a self-powered,
    self-levelling, automatic picture hook.

    The correct answer is (c). If you answered (a) or (b) you are a weenie.

    --
    Jay Levitt |
    Wellesley, MA | Hi!
    Faster: jay at jay dot eff-em | Where are we going?
    http://www.jay.fm | Why am I in this handbasket?
  9. Hey Mike;

    I use Illustrator and have a template for it but when in a pinch or
    outta the house I use this:

    http://www.papercdcase.com/

    as long as you have Adobe Acrobat yer good to go!!

    Hope this helps, i've learned plenty from ya so it's always good to be
    able to give some back...
  10. Ethan Winer

    Ethan Winer Guest

    Mike,

    I use Visio. It's an engineering program, but it's fabulous for desktop
    publishing and all manner of CD art and booklets. If any of you have Visio
    and want a complete set of templates for a CD label, booklet, and back/side
    panel, find "Using Visio Professional 5.0 for CD Labels and Artwork" about
    1/4 way down the list on my Articles page:

    www.ethanwiner.com/articles.html

    --Ethan
  11. Mike Rivers

    Mike Rivers Guest

    In article <_E11b.794235$ro6.15910398@news2.calgary.shaw.ca> alternate-root@shaw.ca writes:

    > Yes......but it comes with simple software.This puts the text in the right
    > spots on the CD......and I did read your post.If you can't figure out the CD
    > stomper software then I don't know what to tell you.That is probably the
    > most basic CD program out there for the average home user.I don't mean this
    > as an insult either.


    I think there may be several programs that have been delivered with
    the CD Stomper. The one I have is called Click 'n' Design 3D. I think
    I'm doing the right thing, and some things work and others don't. Call
    me stupid, ignorant, or not willing to learn. I just can't simplify
    the simple designs enough so that all I get is text on a blank label,
    and I can't place things where they fit. Song and album titles are
    often more than four short words.

    I can get sort of close if I don't use a background at all (I found
    out how to do that) but there are some things that I just can't figure
    out. For instance, rather unintuitively I've been able to do two
    concentric lines of curved text around the top of the disk layout, but
    I can't figure out how to do curved text around the bottom, curved up
    instead of down, but not upside down. In fact, I can't even figure out
    how to place centered text around the bottom of an axis through the
    center of the disk. Maybe there's a way, it's just not intuitive and I
    can't make heads or tails of the manual.


    Hey! Wait a minute! I just did it, almost, with a combination of
    spaces before the "top" line and between the "top" and "bottom" lines.
    Still can't get the bottom to flip over so that it's oriented the same
    as the top:

    First Line of title
    Second Line of Title



    o



    Artist (this line comes out upside down when
    it's part of the title "circle)




    Kind of klunky, but it is indeed WYSIWYG. It would be nice if there
    was a centering scale though, rather than just inches from the margin.
    Good thing I keep a calculator handy.


    Still, for now, thanks for the Word templates, and I'll keep my
    CD-safe marker pens handy.



    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
  12. Chip Borton

    Chip Borton Guest

    I use MS Publisher, does a decent job.
  13. Troy

    Troy Guest

    Casio CW 50 or CP 88 both the same thing.There are lots on ebay.


    Steve O'Neill <steveo@omsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:bi2nig$7a0$1@woodrow.ucdavis.edu...
    > What do they call that printer?
    >
    > Troy wrote:
    > >>>For about $80 dollars you can get a small CD printer that will print

    >
  14. Actually Mike, Quark is available for windows. I'd be happy to send
    you a template for CDs and jewel cases, but clearly Word is the way to
    go for you since you already have it and know it. I wasn't trying to
    tell you to use Quark, only that it works for me. Using Word makes
    more sense for you, which was my basic suggestion. So it looks like
    you've gotten everything you wanted, right? Or do you still need
    somebody to send you a Word template for your sticky round CD labels?

    ulysses

    Mike Rivers <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:

    > This is why I was looking at something that I could use with Word. I
    > use that every day. I don't even own a Mac, so that's a stumbling
    > block with Quark.
    >
    > Clearly I'm not the only person who has ever wanted to make a CD label
    > with a given program. Why can't I benefit from someone else's work
    > here and just get a template that works? Brian sent me a Word template
    > for the back liner and it works just fine. Like so many questions that
    > get posed here, everyone who doesn't agree with my concept of work
    > flow tells me how THEY think I should be approaching the job. One
    > person gave me a real answer that I can use, for which I'm thankful.
    >
    > > It's not hard, and since CDs and jewel cases are standardized
    > > it'll be useful for a long time.

    >
    > Exactly my point. But maybe the concept of shareware has just gone out
    > the window.
  15. Mike Rivers

    Mike Rivers Guest

    In article <MPG.19aead80c7be163a989a04@news-east.giganews.com> jay+news@jay.fm writes:

    > Geez, Mike, what kind of engineer are you? I have to wonder about
    > you... please take the following test.
    >
    > If you see a picture on the wall that is crooked, do you:
    >
    > (a) do nothing.
    >
    > (b) Straighten it.
    >
    > (c) Spend the next six months learning a high-end CAD/CAM system and
    > buying a 3D printer so that you can design and fabricate a self-powered,
    > self-levelling, automatic picture hook.
    >
    > The correct answer is (c). If you answered (a) or (b) you are a weenie.


    My answer is (a). If you want to straighten pictures when you're over
    here, I won't object. I probably won't even intentionally skew them
    after you leave either, so maybe they won't bother you the next time.



    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
  16. Jay Levitt

    Jay Levitt Guest

    In article <znr1061486075k@trad>, mrivers@d-and-d.com says...
    > My answer is (a). If you want to straighten pictures when you're over
    > here, I won't object.


    I'd love to, but I don't have the time. I just bought AutoCAD and this
    3D printer, see, and...

    --
    Jay Levitt |
    Wellesley, MA | Hi!
    Faster: jay at jay dot eff-em | Where are we going?
    http://www.jay.fm | Why am I in this handbasket?
  17. Mike Cressey

    Mike Cressey Guest

    I use Microsoft Publisher 2002 (I think). It's easier than Word for
    doing CD labels. For the other stuff, I use Neato's software
    MediaFace because I use the pre-cut Neato photo-matter paper to do all
    my CD printing on.

    Mike
  18. Mike Rivers

    Mike Rivers Guest

    In article <210820031414003137%ulysses@rollmusic.com> ulysses@rollmusic.com writes:

    > So it looks like
    > you've gotten everything you wanted, right? Or do you still need
    > somebody to send you a Word template for your sticky round CD labels?


    Got one, thanks. Since I don't consider CDs that I make at home to be
    very "finished", I really don't care all that much about sticking a
    label on the disk, but a neatly printed liner for the jewel case makes
    it more like a tape box.



    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
  19. Todd H.

    Todd H. Guest

    mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers) writes:
    > My rant for the day:
    >
    > I don't make CDs very often, but this morning I transferred a half
    > hour live program from tape to CD. First was the half-hour transfer
    > time, then a little editing. No problem so far.
    >
    > Then I opened up the file in Nero and dropped markers in between songs
    > so that it would "look" like a CD when played. Burned a CD. Checked
    > it. One track, 12 indexes. OK, so I forgot that you have to click on
    > "Split on markers" before it will separate the file into individual
    > tracks. On to Take Two.
    >
    > Checked that out. OK, now there are 12 tracks, but it seems like
    > there's too long of a pause between them. I look at the Nero track
    > list and find that it's inserted 2 seconds between them. Took that
    > out, and burned another CD. Take Two is OK.
    >
    > So I thought I'd make a neat liner for the case, and maybe even a
    > label since I have the stuff. I opened up Nero's label designer and
    > absolutely couldn't figure out how to use it. All I wanted to do was
    > type text on to something that I could cut out to fit the CD case, and
    > put a simple label on the disk.


    Mike,

    Musicmatch Jukebox has been a godscend for me. Same program that
    plays my mp3's on my computer -- one click and I can burn a playlist,
    another click and I can burn a simple label of that playlist
    automatically generated off the ID tags in the audio file.

    The one that comes with Musicmatch is pretty spartan, but I'm very
    tempted to get the Musicmatch labeller add-in to spritz it up. One
    stop shopping for listening, burning, and labeling with jewel cases.

    The only thing in your flow it doesn't have is a notion of track
    splitting or audio editing. For that, I use the goldwave audio editor
    in conjunction with wavmerge to concatenate live music files togehter,
    and split them on markers into individual wav's.

    From there, I add them to Musicmatch, edit the track tags, and I'm
    set -- to listen, burn, label.

    Best Regards,
    --
    /"\ ASCII Ribbon Campaign | Todd H
    \ / | http://www.toddh.net/
    X Promoting good netiquette | http://triplethreatband.com/
    / \ http://www.toddh.net/netiquette/ | "4 lines suffice."
  20. Tommy Bowen

    Tommy Bowen Guest

    "Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote

    > The Casio printer looks pretty sleazy, and with the cost of the labels
    > and ink, it amounts to not much less than a buck a disk.


    Labels and ink? It uses neither labels nor ink. And it's very much
    less than a buck a disc. Maybe 20 cents a disc here.

    > Sorry, you don't win the vacation in Vegas this time.


    Just trying to offer some options to your problem. Sorry it's not what
    you were fishing for.

    - Tommy

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