Sine WAV Generators?

Discussion in 'rec.audio.pro' started by FrankDebro1, Aug 18, 2003.

  1. FrankDebro1

    FrankDebro1 Guest

    I need a sine wav generator to test the room? Are there any VST plugins or
    standalone freebies on the net?
  2. Ben Bradley

    Ben Bradley Guest

    In rec.audio.pro, frankdebro1@aol.com (FrankDebro1) wrote:

    >I need a sine wav generator to test the room? Are there any VST plugins or
    >standalone freebies on the net?


    You should be able to find shareware programs such as Cool Edit 96
    or some old version of Goldwave to do this. Even the Cool Edit 2000
    shareware version should be able to generate and play a sine wave of
    any frequency.
  3. Arny Krueger

    Arny Krueger Guest

    "FrankDebro1" <frankdebro1@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:20030818122446.06372.00000200@mb-m19.aol.com
    > I need a sine wav generator to test the room? Are there any VST
    > plugins or standalone freebies on the net?


    http://www.stud.fh-hannover.de/~heineman/freeware.htm
  4. Mike Rivers

    Mike Rivers Guest

    In article <20030818122446.06372.00000200@mb-m19.aol.com> frankdebro1@aol.com writes:

    > I need a sine wav generator to test the room? Are there any VST plugins or
    > standalone freebies on the net?


    Go to http://www.nt-instruments and look for the virtual Minirator.

    By the way, "wav" is a file name extension, "wave" is what goes with
    "sine."


    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
  5. P Stamler

    P Stamler Guest

    Oh, and...you probably won't get much useful information by testing your room
    with sine waves, except perhaps to find the frequency of that annoying
    bookshelf rattle. More likely you'll get useful results from pink noise. I
    believe CoolEdit 2000 can generate that -- yep, it can.

    Peace,
    Paul
  6. Tommi

    Tommi Guest

    What about a sine sweep? With that I noticed a bunch of peaks and valleys in
    my own room. :eek: Well, it really helped..




    "P Stamler" <pstamler@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:20030818193438.05610.00000224@mb-m16.aol.com...
    > Oh, and...you probably won't get much useful information by testing your

    room
    > with sine waves, except perhaps to find the frequency of that annoying
    > bookshelf rattle. More likely you'll get useful results from pink noise. I
    > believe CoolEdit 2000 can generate that -- yep, it can.
  7. P Stamler

    P Stamler Guest

    >What about a sine sweep? With that I noticed a bunch of peaks and valleys in
    >my own room. :eek: Well, it really helped..


    Did it? Yes, you're mapping plenty of peaks and valleys, and if the sweep is
    slow enough, you'll get something that looks like the Himalayas. Move the
    microphone six inches, and you'll get the Rockies. Move again, and you'll get
    the high Sierras. The point is that sine waves are too sensitive and too
    location specific to be much use. Pink noise will tell you more -- although it
    still helps to average a few locations.

    Oh, and with either of them, you're not only mapping the response of the room,
    but the response, on and off axis, of the sound source, presumably your
    monitors.

    Peace,
    Paul
  8. Tommi

    Tommi Guest

    Yeah well, I put an omni mic exactly where I work, ie. to the sweet spot of
    my monitors, checked the result, and that helped. My point was just that it
    isn't as useless as one would think. Frank, listen to the room, and do both
    a sine sweep and a pink noise test. Also check the room modes you have
    mathematically, then start thinking how you could improve the room
    acoustics. Good luck!




    "P Stamler" <pstamler@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:20030819164835.29729.00000180@mb-m24.aol.com...
    > Did it? Yes, you're mapping plenty of peaks and valleys, and if the sweep

    is
    > slow enough, you'll get something that looks like the Himalayas. Move the
    > microphone six inches, and you'll get the Rockies. Move again, and you'll

    get
    > the high Sierras. The point is that sine waves are too sensitive and too
    > location specific to be much use. Pink noise will tell you more --

    although it
    > still helps to average a few locations.
    >
    > Oh, and with either of them, you're not only mapping the response of the

    room,
    > but the response, on and off axis, of the sound source, presumably your
    > monitors.
    >
    > Peace,
    > Paul
  9. On 18 Aug 2003 16:24:46 GMT, frankdebro1@aol.com (FrankDebro1) wrote:

    >I need a sine wav generator to test the room? Are there any VST plugins or
    >standalone freebies on the net?


    Just do a google search for "software sine wave generator", and you're
    likely to get several hits. I recently found a free one for some
    testing, but have since uninstalled it.

    Mark

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