Sonar

Discussion in 'Sequencing Software' started by soongen, Jan 30, 2003.

  1. soongen

    soongen New Member

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    I've been using Cakewalk for more than 5 years and now thinking to upgrade to Sonar. Has anyone used used it? What are the differences and advantages of it compared to Cakewalk pro Audio
  2. nidogflynn

    nidogflynn New Member

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    Hi.

    I too have been using Cakewalk Pro Audio for a number of years.
    Last year I changed over to Sonar 2. The main difference is that the interface has been redesigned. In some ways it's easier to use however I was used to the old "look" so it didn't bother either way. The other main difference as far as I'm concerned is that Sonar supports DXi's. These are virtual instruments along the lines of Steinbergs VSTi's. So if you want to use various synths and drum machines from WITHIN your sequencer then this is a definite bonus. This means you can "render" or record midi parts down offline-a hell of a lot faster than recording them in "real" time. You can also apply FX to them via the aux sends. Apart from that not much has changed (in regards to how I use the program!). I have found that Sonar is not as stable as Pro Audio v9. And overall the midi capabilities of Cubase are better.
  3. BlackHawk

    BlackHawk New Member

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    If you have Windows XP, then Sonar is very stable indeed. Plus, I think that Sonar has the best paino roll editor of all the "Big Three" sequencers (Sonar, Cubase, Logic).

    Also, audio handling has been completely redesigned for Sonar, and audio is therefore comparatively much, much easier to work with than it was in Cakewalk Pro Audio.

    Also, proper automation is now a reality for both audio tracks and MIDI ones. You can draw in automation lines and curves to change all manner of parameters from volume, to (for example) the filter cutoff control for a synth. This automation approach is a lot easier than drawing in controllers to the Piano Roll view because you are not actually working with raw controller data - you are only working with curves. In other words, you are working more in a relative way (i.e. relative to other automation data) than an absolute one (i.e. drawing raw controller data into the piano roll view). Also, any automation events you put in can be changed at any moment simply by clicking and dragging, because of this non-absolute nature.

    Even though the interface has been redesigned, it is still similar enough to Pro Audio to enable you to start using the program right away, in the way you used to before you upgraded.

    So I'd say go for it. You know the interface already. What's new to you can be learnt along the way pretty easily, because you don't have to learn the interface first.

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