Sond forge 4.5

Discussion in 'rec.audio.pro' started by Sandra, Aug 13, 2003.

  1. Sandra

    Sandra Guest

    Dear All,

    We are converting .mpg & *.wav files to *.mp3 with Sound forge 4.5.

    Can anybody suggest ideal settings for getting maximum possible
    optimized file size for the *.mp3.

    Any idea what is the audio codec...encoder used in Sound Forge 4.5?
    does that affect the file size of *.mp3....

    Any help is appreciated.....

    Lehar
  2. Ethan Winer

    Ethan Winer Guest

    Lehar,

    > Can anybody suggest ideal settings for getting maximum possible optimized

    file size for the *.mp3. <

    I don't use the SF encoder, but the concepts are the same with any encoder.
    There's always a tradeoff between file size and fidelity. The smaller the
    file, the worse the sound quality. Your best bet is to experiment with the
    various encoding parameters, and find the best balance for the kind of tunes
    you produce.

    --Ethan
  3. Sugarite

    Sugarite Guest

    > Dear All,
    >
    > We are converting .mpg & *.wav files to *.mp3 with Sound forge 4.5.
    >
    > Can anybody suggest ideal settings for getting maximum possible
    > optimized file size for the *.mp3.
    >
    > Any idea what is the audio codec...encoder used in Sound Forge 4.5?
    > does that affect the file size of *.mp3....


    Never mind Sound Forge for mp3 encoding. dBpowerAMP Music Converter is the
    ticket, despite the stupid name. Get the Lame MP3 codec for it, and just
    right-click on the files you want converted, set the bitrate, and off it
    goes, generates the best sounding MP3's at any given bitrate, and it's free!

    As for what bitrate to use, it depends on the source sound quality and the
    target audience. If it's decent material but just web clips for demo
    purposes, 128kbps is standard, but 160 offers marginally cleaner treble if
    it's a shorter song/clip. If it's mono you can afford to cut the rate by
    more than half, since stereo imaging issues are the first problems to pop up
    and are no longer an issue. For super-tiny files go with mono, 8-bit, 32kHz
    (you'll have to drop bit-depth and sample rate in Sound Forge) at 48kbps,
    about AM radio quality.

    For best sound there's no point in going higher than 256kbps. Sonograms of
    the compression artifacts indicate that the Lame codec actually renders
    cleaner results at 256 than 320, don't ask me why. Beyond that look into
    FLAC, a lossless codec that has a WinAMP plug-in so they can be played
    without having to expand them, also available for dBpowerAMP for convenient
    encoding.
  4. Jay Kahrs

    Jay Kahrs Guest

    >We are converting .mpg & *.wav files to *.mp3 with Sound forge 4.5.
    >


    Really? I didn't think you could save as MP3's with version 4.5. I just
    upgraded to 6 because it came with the Batch Converter and I had to convert,
    maybe 300 files to MP3's for a voiceover client.

    ---
    -Jay Kahrs
    Owner - Chief Engineer
    Mad Moose Recording Inc.
    Morris Plains, NJ
    http://www.madmooserecording.com
    - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Come visit me here --> http://www.gearslutz.com
  5. ChuxGarage

    ChuxGarage Guest

    >Really? I didn't think you could save as MP3's with version 4.5

    Yes you can, if you pay them an additional $29.95 or so. You can upgrade on
    line. They give you a key code that unlocks the MP3 function.
  6. Craig Cordts

    Craig Cordts Guest

    This doesnt really relate to what your asking but have you though
    about using Windows Media Audio (.wma) files . The free encoder
    available from Microsoft is very powerful and *.wma files integrate
    into web pages better that mp3 IMHO. Sonically they are the same.

    Anyone delivering audio/video from the web should check out the
    Windows Media Encoder. It is by far my favorite format.

    Craig
  7. W. Williams

    W. Williams Guest

    There were initially two releases of SF 4.5 if I remember correctly, the
    standard full release and and OEM release. The full version included the
    MP3 plug-in for free, but you had to register it with Sonic Foundry (either
    online or telephonically). This version of the plug-in did not offer many
    encoding options, but used the Frauenhofer codec. The OEM version required
    a separate purchase to be made, but this add-on option is apparently no
    longer available.

    SF 4.5 also had a batch converter, but it was not nearly as user friendly as
    the stand-alone version and you couldn't use SF for anything else until
    conversion had completed. So, I wouldn't kick myself for upgrading if I
    were you. The increased productivity obtained from non-destructive editing
    and separate batch converter are worth the $$. The biggest difference in
    respect of MP3 is that they are now using the faster Xing codec.

    W

    "Jay Kahrs" wrote:

    > Really? I didn't think you could save as MP3's with version 4.5. I just
    > upgraded to 6 because it came with the Batch Converter and I had to

    convert,
    > maybe 300 files to MP3's for a voiceover client.
    >
    > ---
    > -Jay Kahrs
    > Owner - Chief Engineer
    > Mad Moose Recording Inc.
    > Morris Plains, NJ
    > http://www.madmooserecording.com
    > - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    > Come visit me here --> http://www.gearslutz.com

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