Studio Door

Discussion in 'rec.audio.pro' started by Higgs, Aug 16, 2003.

  1. Higgs

    Higgs Guest

    The largest room in my house is 16' x 20'. I am wanting to split this
    room into two 16' x 10' areas. This room has an 8' ceiling. For one
    half I am wanting to make it as soundproof as possible. I am planning
    on floating an inner "room within a room" on Auralex U-Boats. The
    floor will be 2' x 4' construction with one layer of 3/4 plywood, one
    of 5/8 sheetrock, and one of 5/8 plywood. The walls (2' x 4'
    construction)will sit on top of strips of limp-mass vinyl. Well, at
    this point you probably get the idea of what I am doing. There are
    several websites that have basic plans for this type of room.

    My question is, what to do for a door? I see all of these articles
    about the room itself, but they neglect to mention the door. My plan
    as of now is to place an ordinary exterior door onto it. If I do this
    it seems that I just might be wasting my money on the rest of the
    room, since I'm sure that the door will let in more noise than the
    room I mentioned above.

    Although I can't find any studio-specific doors listed anywhere, I
    know that they would be too expensive for my project. So the options
    as I am seeing them is to either:

    1. Try and match the soundblocking qualities of the room to the door
    I choose (and save some $$.)

    or

    2. Find a way to increase the soundblocking qualities of the door to
    match the room.

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks in advance for any help.

    -Higgs
  2. Mike Rivers

    Mike Rivers Guest

    In article <4e3cce4a.0308160327.602029ce@posting.google.com> jamescashworth@yahoo.com writes:

    > My question is, what to do for a door? I see all of these articles
    > about the room itself, but they neglect to mention the door.


    Door? You just build the musicians into the room, and feed them
    electronically. No door needed. Be sure to put in plenty of guitar
    strings and drum sticks before you seal them up, though.

    > My plan
    > as of now is to place an ordinary exterior door onto it. If I do this
    > it seems that I just might be wasting my money on the rest of the
    > room, since I'm sure that the door will let in more noise than the
    > room I mentioned above.


    Wenger makes great studio doors. They're several layers, they have
    gaskets, and a neat cam arrangement that rasises and lowers the door
    slightly as you open and close it so that the gaskets will seat.
    They're very expensive. If you're going to all of that trouble to
    soundproof the room, you need a door like this. Otherwise, as you
    suggest, you're just wasting your time.

    > 2. Find a way to increase the soundblocking qualities of the door to
    > match the room.


    You can start out with a solid core door and add a couple of layers of
    MDF to increase the mass, but you won't be able to make as good an
    airtight seal around the edge as with the "real thing." Don't forget
    to beef up the hinges too, when adding mass to the door.

    > Any suggestions?


    Before you wrap up your budget, consider ventilation and air
    conditioning. That can be even more expensive than a door, and just as
    big a sound leak if it's not done correctly. Bottom line - you CANNOT
    build a soundproof studio on a tiny budget, even if you do all the
    construction work yourself. Materials are specialized and expensive.



    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
  3. Higgs

    Higgs Guest

    Well, I wont rule out anything on costs alone (to a point of course.)
    I can't seem to find a URL to Wenger, any idea what it is?

    mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers) wrote in message news:<znr1061037081k@trad>...
    > In article <4e3cce4a.0308160327.602029ce@posting.google.com> jamescashworth@yahoo.com writes:
    >
    > > My question is, what to do for a door? I see all of these articles
    > > about the room itself, but they neglect to mention the door.

    >
    > Door? You just build the musicians into the room, and feed them
    > electronically. No door needed. Be sure to put in plenty of guitar
    > strings and drum sticks before you seal them up, though.
    >
    > > My plan
    > > as of now is to place an ordinary exterior door onto it. If I do this
    > > it seems that I just might be wasting my money on the rest of the
    > > room, since I'm sure that the door will let in more noise than the
    > > room I mentioned above.

    >
    > Wenger makes great studio doors. They're several layers, they have
    > gaskets, and a neat cam arrangement that rasises and lowers the door
    > slightly as you open and close it so that the gaskets will seat.
    > They're very expensive. If you're going to all of that trouble to
    > soundproof the room, you need a door like this. Otherwise, as you
    > suggest, you're just wasting your time.
    >
    > > 2. Find a way to increase the soundblocking qualities of the door to
    > > match the room.

    >
    > You can start out with a solid core door and add a couple of layers of
    > MDF to increase the mass, but you won't be able to make as good an
    > airtight seal around the edge as with the "real thing." Don't forget
    > to beef up the hinges too, when adding mass to the door.
    >
    > > Any suggestions?

    >
    > Before you wrap up your budget, consider ventilation and air
    > conditioning. That can be even more expensive than a door, and just as
    > big a sound leak if it's not done correctly. Bottom line - you CANNOT
    > build a soundproof studio on a tiny budget, even if you do all the
    > construction work yourself. Materials are specialized and expensive.
  4. Higgs <jamescashworth@yahoo.com> wrote:

    > Well, I wont rule out anything on costs alone (to a point of course.)
    > I can't seem to find a URL to Wenger, any idea what it is?


    Google, my man. <g> Terms: [wenger sound isolation door]

    "Closing the door on noise - A breakthrough in sound isolation.
    "So whether you're building, renovating, adding on or replacing doors
    "that don't work, the Wenger Acoustical Door is your solution to sound
    "isolation. ... "

    <store.wengercorp.com/webapp/commerce/command/ProductDisplay?prrfnbr=782
    2&prmenbr=586>

    --
    hank alrich * secret mountain
    audio recording * music production * sound reinforcement
    "If laughter is the best medicine let's take a double dose"
  5. Jay Kahrs

    Jay Kahrs Guest

    >The largest room in my house is 16' x 20'. I am wanting to split this
    >room into two 16' x 10' areas. This room has an 8' ceiling.


    Bad move. Consider moving one of the walls by a foot or so so that you don't
    have a room that's 16' wide and 8' high. 15x8 and 17x8 would give you much
    better room modes.

    ---
    -Jay Kahrs
    Owner - Chief Engineer
    Mad Moose Recording Inc.
    Morris Plains, NJ
    http://www.madmooserecording.com
    - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Come visit me here --> http://www.gearslutz.com
  6. Home Depot has a door called "Safe and Sound" that is quite good at
    blocking sound and fire.
    It looks like a normal door and works well. JK

    Higgs wrote:

    >The largest room in my house is 16' x 20'. I am wanting to split this
    >room into two 16' x 10' areas. This room has an 8' ceiling. For one
    >half I am wanting to make it as soundproof as possible. I am planning
    >on floating an inner "room within a room" on Auralex U-Boats. The
    >floor will be 2' x 4' construction with one layer of 3/4 plywood, one
    >of 5/8 sheetrock, and one of 5/8 plywood. The walls (2' x 4'
    >construction)will sit on top of strips of limp-mass vinyl. Well, at
    >this point you probably get the idea of what I am doing. There are
    >several websites that have basic plans for this type of room.
    >
    >My question is, what to do for a door? I see all of these articles
    >about the room itself, but they neglect to mention the door. My plan
    >as of now is to place an ordinary exterior door onto it. If I do this
    >it seems that I just might be wasting my money on the rest of the
    >room, since I'm sure that the door will let in more noise than the
    >room I mentioned above.
    >
    >Although I can't find any studio-specific doors listed anywhere, I
    >know that they would be too expensive for my project. So the options
    >as I am seeing them is to either:
    >
    >1. Try and match the soundblocking qualities of the room to the door
    >I choose (and save some $$.)
    >
    >or
    >
    >2. Find a way to increase the soundblocking qualities of the door to
    >match the room.
    >
    >Any suggestions?
    >
    >Thanks in advance for any help.
    >
    >-Higgs
    >
    >
  7. Jay Kahrs <brownsnd14@aol.com> wrote:

    > >The largest room in my house is 16' x 20'. I am wanting to split this
    > >room into two 16' x 10' areas. This room has an 8' ceiling.


    > Bad move. Consider moving one of the walls by a foot or so so that you don't
    > have a room that's 16' wide and 8' high. 15x8 and 17x8 would give you much
    > better room modes.



    What he said. Taking care of some of the problems by controlling the
    dimensions of the rooms will save a hell of a lot of hassle, money,
    time, and deliver a much better result.

    --
    hank alrich * secret mountain
    audio recording * music production * sound reinforcement
    "If laughter is the best medicine let's take a double dose"
  8. RB

    RB Guest

    www.wengercorp.com


    "Higgs" <jamescashworth@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:4e3cce4a.0308161009.117df1ad@posting.google.com...
    > Well, I wont rule out anything on costs alone (to a point of course.)
    > I can't seem to find a URL to Wenger, any idea what it is?
    >
    > mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers) wrote in message

    news:<znr1061037081k@trad>...
    > > In article <4e3cce4a.0308160327.602029ce@posting.google.com>

    jamescashworth@yahoo.com writes:
    > >
    > > > My question is, what to do for a door? I see all of these articles
    > > > about the room itself, but they neglect to mention the door.

    > >
    > > Door? You just build the musicians into the room, and feed them
    > > electronically. No door needed. Be sure to put in plenty of guitar
    > > strings and drum sticks before you seal them up, though.
    > >
    > > > My plan
    > > > as of now is to place an ordinary exterior door onto it. If I do this
    > > > it seems that I just might be wasting my money on the rest of the
    > > > room, since I'm sure that the door will let in more noise than the
    > > > room I mentioned above.

    > >
    > > Wenger makes great studio doors. They're several layers, they have
    > > gaskets, and a neat cam arrangement that rasises and lowers the door
    > > slightly as you open and close it so that the gaskets will seat.
    > > They're very expensive. If you're going to all of that trouble to
    > > soundproof the room, you need a door like this. Otherwise, as you
    > > suggest, you're just wasting your time.
    > >
    > > > 2. Find a way to increase the soundblocking qualities of the door to
    > > > match the room.

    > >
    > > You can start out with a solid core door and add a couple of layers of
    > > MDF to increase the mass, but you won't be able to make as good an
    > > airtight seal around the edge as with the "real thing." Don't forget
    > > to beef up the hinges too, when adding mass to the door.
    > >
    > > > Any suggestions?

    > >
    > > Before you wrap up your budget, consider ventilation and air
    > > conditioning. That can be even more expensive than a door, and just as
    > > big a sound leak if it's not done correctly. Bottom line - you CANNOT
    > > build a soundproof studio on a tiny budget, even if you do all the
    > > construction work yourself. Materials are specialized and expensive.
  9. Chris

    Chris Guest

    In article <Fxs%a.3157$Q_.2537@fe03.atl2.webusenet.com>,
    jameskid@bellsouth.net says...
    > Home Depot has a door called "Safe and Sound" that is quite good at
    > blocking sound and fire.
    > It looks like a normal door and works well. JK
    >
    > Higgs wrote:
    >
    > >The largest room in my house is 16' x 20'. I am wanting to split this
    > >room into two 16' x 10' areas. This room has an 8' ceiling. For one
    > >half I am wanting to make it as soundproof as possible. I am planning
    > >on floating an inner "room within a room" on Auralex U-Boats. The
    > >floor will be 2' x 4' construction with one layer of 3/4 plywood, one
    > >of 5/8 sheetrock, and one of 5/8 plywood. The walls (2' x 4'
    > >construction)will sit on top of strips of limp-mass vinyl. Well, at
    > >this point you probably get the idea of what I am doing. There are
    > >several websites that have basic plans for this type of room.
    > >
    > >My question is, what to do for a door? I see all of these articles
    > >about the room itself, but they neglect to mention the door. My plan
    > >as of now is to place an ordinary exterior door onto it. If I do this
    > >it seems that I just might be wasting my money on the rest of the
    > >room, since I'm sure that the door will let in more noise than the
    > >room I mentioned above.
    > >
    > >Although I can't find any studio-specific doors listed anywhere, I
    > >know that they would be too expensive for my project. So the options
    > >as I am seeing them is to either:
    > >
    > >1. Try and match the soundblocking qualities of the room to the door
    > >I choose (and save some $$.)
    > >
    > >or
    > >
    > >2. Find a way to increase the soundblocking qualities of the door to
    > >match the room.
    > >
    > >Any suggestions?
    > >
    > >Thanks in advance for any help.
    > >
    > >-Higgs
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    >

    You could consider installing a door that opened out onto another room or
    corridor, if possible.

    I have also had good results with (about 6") thick home-made doors that
    are slightly tapered to fit their frames which are fitted with several
    draught-exclusion-type gaskets let into recesses in the frame. The door
    is than filled with sand (line it with plastic first)and closed with a
    meat-safe type handle which presses the door into the rubber seals. This
    assumes reasonable carpentry skill is available locally.

    The really cheap version is two sections of double/triple glazed sliding
    patio doors. This works surprisingly well if the gap between is big
    enough and the inner & outer doors are not parallel. The advantage is
    that they are cheap and readily available, the disadvantage is you can
    still see the musicians!!!

    Both of these solutions are almost air-tight so think carefully about
    your ventilation/heating/cooling arrangements first!

    Pip pip

    Good luck

    --
    Chris Notton
    Replace "nospam" with my surname to reply by email
    Sostituisca il "nospam" con il mio cognome per rispondere
    }<////(*>
  10. I went with a sound lock between recording spaces. Any sound has to bleed
    through one door, turn a corner, and bleed through another door to get
    through. I used solid core door covered with closed cell foam which seals
    against over-size jams. I could put Jaimie Lee Curtis in one room screaming
    bloody murder and never know it.

    Chuck Robertson
    Pool House Studio
    "Higgs" <jamescashworth@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:4e3cce4a.0308160327.602029ce@posting.google.com...
    > The largest room in my house is 16' x 20'. I am wanting to split this
    > room into two 16' x 10' areas. This room has an 8' ceiling. For one
    > half I am wanting to make it as soundproof as possible. I am planning
    > on floating an inner "room within a room" on Auralex U-Boats. The
    > floor will be 2' x 4' construction with one layer of 3/4 plywood, one
    > of 5/8 sheetrock, and one of 5/8 plywood. The walls (2' x 4'
    > construction)will sit on top of strips of limp-mass vinyl. Well, at
    > this point you probably get the idea of what I am doing. There are
    > several websites that have basic plans for this type of room.
    >
    > My question is, what to do for a door? I see all of these articles
    > about the room itself, but they neglect to mention the door. My plan
    > as of now is to place an ordinary exterior door onto it. If I do this
    > it seems that I just might be wasting my money on the rest of the
    > room, since I'm sure that the door will let in more noise than the
    > room I mentioned above.
    >
    > Although I can't find any studio-specific doors listed anywhere, I
    > know that they would be too expensive for my project. So the options
    > as I am seeing them is to either:
    >
    > 1. Try and match the soundblocking qualities of the room to the door
    > I choose (and save some $$.)
    >
    > or
    >
    > 2. Find a way to increase the soundblocking qualities of the door to
    > match the room.
    >
    > Any suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any help.
    >
    > -Higgs
  11. Higgs

    Higgs Guest

    When the "room inside a room" is completed the dimensions then will be
    around 15' x 9' x 7'. The space in which it will be built is the 16'
    x 10' x 8' I mentioned.

    After the shell is complete I will be working on the acoustics of the
    room as well.

    Any ideas on where I could find a link to that Home-Depot door? I
    searched their site, but didn't find it.


    walkinay@thegrid.net (LeBaron & Alrich) wrote in message news:<1fzsa76.oxgnpmkhmfblN%walkinay@thegrid.net>...
    > Jay Kahrs <brownsnd14@aol.com> wrote:
    >
    > > >The largest room in my house is 16' x 20'. I am wanting to split this
    > > >room into two 16' x 10' areas. This room has an 8' ceiling.

    >
    > > Bad move. Consider moving one of the walls by a foot or so so that you don't
    > > have a room that's 16' wide and 8' high. 15x8 and 17x8 would give you much
    > > better room modes.

    >
    >
    > What he said. Taking care of some of the problems by controlling the
    > dimensions of the rooms will save a hell of a lot of hassle, money,
    > time, and deliver a much better result.
  12. Mike Rivers

    Mike Rivers Guest

    In article <MPG.19a8d28633ebe083989943@news.cis.dfn.de> chris@nospam.net writes:

    > The really cheap version is two sections of double/triple glazed sliding
    > patio doors. This works surprisingly well if the gap between is big
    > enough and the inner & outer doors are not parallel. The advantage is
    > that they are cheap and readily available, the disadvantage is you can
    > still see the musicians!!!


    A pair of good sliding glass doors isn't really cheap, but it's
    cheaper than a Wenger. An advantage is that if you have the space to
    spare, you can use the little room that's created between them as an
    extra isolation booth when things aren't too loud in the main rooms.



    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)

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