The best program for doing music.. editing.. singing..cuting.. effects. and much more

Discussion in 'Digital Audio & Recording' started by jo787, Sep 11, 2003.

  1. Graeme

    Graeme New Member

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    I might not know too much about loops, but I do know a bit about editing :). I am finding it very difficult to envisage how any software could do a job like this 'automatically'. OK, it's easy enough to search for a couple of zero points, but (and particularly in the somewhat special case of looping) the performance characteristics of the material also have to match extremely well. I can't see how one could get software to check this.

    As for editing in general, I've taken the liberty of copying to here a 'basic rough guide to editing' which I wrote elsewhere. Looping wasn't a consideration, but the general principles hold true, no matter what the desired end product.

    I apologise to you if there's nothing here you don't already know, but there may be others reading this thread who might find it of use.


    Editing Guide


    Each case has to be taken on merit, but here are some rough guidelines. If you work to these, then you should never have a problem.

    1. Try and pick an edit point where any very small glitch would not be noticed. Although it is often recommended to cut 'on the beat', this is often not the best point in this respect and you might find it easier to hide an edit by cutting before or after the beat.

    2. Wherever you cut, you must ensure that the levels match between the out and the in. Again, the most common recommendation is to cut at the zero point but this is not an absolute requirement as long as the levels match.

    3. ... and this is the one most people fall down on. The waveform of both the out and in must be moving in the same direction. That is, if the out point is moving downwards, then so must the in point and vice versa. You must adhere to this rule even when cutting at the zero point, since a sudden reversal in direction is bound to produce an unwanted sound.

    You will note that I have said nothing about matching the performance qualities at the cutting points, I'm assuming you understand the necessity for this.


    Editing is no mystery, although it might seem a bit of a black art to some. In fact, it is a lot easier to do with modern digital technology than it was with a razor blade. What it does require, however, is a lot of practice to make perfect.


    I might just do this. Not that I have any use for it, but I am interested in how they have approached the problem. Unfortunately, time dictates this is a project which will have to go on the back burner for a while, but I will get around to it at some time.
  2. Zandro

    Zandro New Member

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    Thank you for your time and energy. The guide you have provided informed me in such to come to realise that MPT probably is the best for looping anywhere at this time, so I will continue to use it. Have a great day! :thumbsup:
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2004
  3. geckormf

    geckormf New Member

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    Has anyone used the Audio Montage in WaveLab effectively? I've tried it a couple of times - it's great for setting relative levels of tracks before burning to CD, but never for looping and editing.

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