Thorens 125!

Discussion in 'rec.audio.pro' started by Max Metral, Jul 30, 2003.

  1. On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 18:23:56 -0700, James Boyk <boyk@caltech.edu>
    wrote:

    >Then there's the story about the Sony model which played one side of an
    >Lp and then flipped it and played the other side. The "flippers" were
    >two grippers operated by DC motors. I heard that at the demo, one of the
    >motors had been wired backwards and so the flippers acted in opposite
    >directions and broke the Lp. It's hard to believe that the record would
    >break, though; more likely it would just fight the flippers to a
    >standstill. A shame not to be able to believe a great story.


    For me, part of what makes it a great story is that, although the
    thing may be a Rube Goldberg contraption, it's at least built on
    a human scale and understandable.

    We've come a long way to a world where we no longer expect to
    be able to understand stuff all around us. Everything is black
    boxes, obsolete before it gets dusty, unrepairable and disposable.
    There's good and bad to it, but seldom humor.


    Chris Hornbeck,
    guyville{at}aristotle{dot}net

    "But you only need to hate these things once, then you figure it out
    and things are all right."

    Mike Rivers
  2. Arny Krueger

    Arny Krueger Guest

    "James Boyk" <boyk@caltech.edu> wrote in message
    news:3F2C642C.1080604@caltech.edu
    > Chris Hornbeck wrote:
    >> I pulled maintainance on one once. Twenty five years and I can
    >> still taste the metallic fear....

    >
    > Yes, it looked formidable.
    >
    > Then there's the story about the Sony model which played one side of
    > an Lp and then flipped it and played the other side. The "flippers"
    > were two grippers operated by DC motors. I heard that at the demo,
    > one of the motors had been wired backwards and so the flippers acted
    > in opposite directions and broke the Lp. It's hard to believe that
    > the record would break, though; more likely it would just fight the
    > flippers to a standstill. A shame not to be able to believe a great
    > story.


    As I read this story, I imagined that one gripper momentarily gripped far
    better than the other, resulting in the LP being injected into earth
    orbit...

    Thanks for the chuckle!
  3. Scott Dorsey

    Scott Dorsey Guest

    James Boyk <boyk@caltech.edu> wrote:
    >For a really serious discussion, we could talk about the Thorens 224,
    >which played both sides of a stack of Lps. I saw one at the old Audio
    >Lab store in Cambridge.


    My father bought one of those at a deep discount through the amateur
    radio club at Bitburg Air Base when they were new. It proceeded to
    damage a large portion of his record collection before it was stolen
    during a move.

    I remember distinctly the machine picking records up and dropping them
    on the floor, or trying to treat 12" LPs as if they are 10".
    --scott
    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  4. James Boyk

    James Boyk Guest

    Scott Dorsey wrote:
    > My father bought one of those.... It proceeded to damage a

    large portion of his record collection before it was stolen during a move.
    I remember distinctly the machine picking records up and dropping them
    on the floor, or trying to treat 12" LPs as if they are 10".


    I'm surprised a Thorens didn't work perfectly. I wonder if it had been
    damaged. The one I saw worked fine.

    James Boyk
  5. Stephen Sank

    Stephen Sank Guest

    I've only worked on one Thorens 224, and it was nearly 20 years ago. But I
    still remember it being a major bitch to get the changer arm working right.
    My "favorite" worst design for a 2-sided record changer, by a wide margin,
    was one that, if I remember right, was made by an Italian company called
    "Lesa". Had these 1.5" diameter hard rubber wheels on little bakelite arms
    that would swing around & ride the platter. The record would drop on top of
    the wheels & spin bacwards. Then a cartridge on the top side of the arm
    would play the bottom of the LP. At the end of the side, the wheels would
    swing back out & let the LP drop onto the platter, to be played as normal on
    the top side. The thing was clunky as hell, but I actually had it working.
    This was also about 20 years ago. I still have a certain fondness for it as
    a classic of horrible design.

    --
    Stephen Sank, Owner & Ribbon Mic Restorer
    Talking Dog Transducer Company
    http://stephensank.com
    5517 Carmelita Drive N.E.
    Albuquerque, New Mexico [87111]
    505-332-0336
    Auth. Nakamichi & McIntosh servicer
    Payments preferred through Paypal.com
    "James Boyk" <boyk@caltech.edu> wrote in message
    news:3F2D4984.1030800@caltech.edu...
    > Scott Dorsey wrote:
    > > My father bought one of those.... It proceeded to damage a

    > large portion of his record collection before it was stolen during a move.
    > I remember distinctly the machine picking records up and dropping them
    > on the floor, or trying to treat 12" LPs as if they are 10".
    >
    >
    > I'm surprised a Thorens didn't work perfectly. I wonder if it had been
    > damaged. The one I saw worked fine.
    >
    > James Boyk
    >
  6. James Boyk

    James Boyk Guest

    What I'd give to have that working in my shop! What a conversation piece!

    James Boyk
  7. On Sun, 03 Aug 2003 13:20:45 -0700, James Boyk <boyk@caltech.edu>
    wrote:

    >What I'd give to have that working in my shop! What a conversation piece!


    The predecessors were the Fisher-Lincoln and another before that but
    that name escapes me at the moment.

    Kal
  8. James Boyk

    James Boyk Guest

    Kalman Rubinson wrote:
    > The predecessors were the Fisher-Lincoln and another before that but
    > that name escapes me at the moment.


    I remember the F-L but never saw one in person. The fact that names escape us shows that we come by this information honestly: we really do date from then.

    James Boyk
  9. Stephen Sank

    Stephen Sank Guest

    The Fisher-Lincoln, which I've only seen on an ebay ad last year, was pretty
    goddamn scary(for the LP), as it played the bottom side of the record in
    mid-air. Judging by the Rube Goldberg mechanism, it had a lot of LP
    mangling potential. You'd have to pay me a lot of money to make me get one
    of those things running. I still like the Lesa better, though, as it was
    totally un-industrial & was making a sincere, but pathetic, attempt to be a
    table that any ordinary person would want to have in their living room.
    Unlike the Thorens & F-L, it was actually the same size as a normal
    turntable.

    --
    Stephen Sank, Owner & Ribbon Mic Restorer
    Talking Dog Transducer Company
    http://stephensank.com
    5517 Carmelita Drive N.E.
    Albuquerque, New Mexico [87111]
    505-332-0336
    Auth. Nakamichi & McIntosh servicer
    Payments preferred through Paypal.com
    "James Boyk" <boyk@caltech.edu> wrote in message
    news:bgkkm8$11j$1@naig.caltech.edu...
    > Kalman Rubinson wrote:
    > > The predecessors were the Fisher-Lincoln and another before that but
    > > that name escapes me at the moment.

    >
    > I remember the F-L but never saw one in person. The fact that names escape

    us shows that we come by this information honestly: we really do date from
    then.
    >
    > James Boyk
    >
  10. Scott Dorsey <kludge@panix.com> wrote:
    > The RAP LP has one cut that cannot be played on a 681 without breakup.


    which one? or are you going to make me haul out my 681 and perform some
    experiments? :)

    --
    Aaron J. Grier | "Not your ordinary poofy goof." | agrier@poofygoof.com
    "Isn't an OS that openly and proudly admits to come directly from Holy
    UNIX better than a cheap UNIX copycat that needs to be sued in court
    to determine what the hell it really is?" -- Michael Sokolov
  11. Ben Bradley

    Ben Bradley Guest

    In rec.audio.pro, agrier@poofygoof.com (Aaron J. Grier) wrote:

    >Scott Dorsey <kludge@panix.com> wrote:
    >> The RAP LP has one cut that cannot be played on a 681 without breakup.

    >
    >which one? or are you going to make me haul out my 681 and perform some
    >experiments? :)


    It must be that classical piano recording. Here it is: "A-3 Debussy
    Prelude No. 8"

    >--
    > Aaron J. Grier | "Not your ordinary poofy goof." | agrier@poofygoof.com
    > "Isn't an OS that openly and proudly admits to come directly from Holy
    > UNIX better than a cheap UNIX copycat that needs to be sued in court
    > to determine what the hell it really is?" -- Michael Sokolov
  12. Scott Dorsey

    Scott Dorsey Guest

    Aaron J. Grier <agrier@poofygoof.com> wrote:
    >Scott Dorsey <kludge@panix.com> wrote:
    >> The RAP LP has one cut that cannot be played on a 681 without breakup.

    >
    >which one? or are you going to make me haul out my 681 and perform some
    >experiments? :)


    The Bass Cornemuse one.
    --scott
    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  13. Scott Dorsey

    Scott Dorsey Guest

    Ben Bradley <ben_nospam_bradley@mindspring.com> wrote:
    >In rec.audio.pro, agrier@poofygoof.com (Aaron J. Grier) wrote:
    >
    >>Scott Dorsey <kludge@panix.com> wrote:
    >>> The RAP LP has one cut that cannot be played on a 681 without breakup.

    >>
    >>which one? or are you going to make me haul out my 681 and perform some
    >>experiments? :)

    >
    > It must be that classical piano recording. Here it is: "A-3 Debussy
    >Prelude No. 8"


    No, but there's something wrong with the classical piano recording. I'm
    not telling what it is either.
    --scott

    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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