Vocal mic positioning for singing drummers

Discussion in 'rec.music.percussion' started by jdcfan, Aug 14, 2003.

  1. jdcfan

    jdcfan Guest

    I've been working on singing and drumming for the past few months and I've
    made great progress. I've experimented with many different positions for
    the mic, but I still haven't decided what is the best place for it. I
    have a boom stand with a gooseneck attachment.

    I've been searching for videos and pictures of singing drummers to get
    some more ideas and see if there was any kind of consensus on what the
    best place for it is. I found a great video of Don Henley playing and
    singing Hotel California. I also found a video of Karen Carpenter from
    the Ed Sullivan show, but it looked like it was lip-synced. I also found
    some old Night Ranger videos with Kelly Keagy. On those videos, Kelly has
    the mic left of his throne and he turns his head toward his left shoulder
    to sing (see the music video for "When You Close Your Eyes" for an
    example).

    For my usual configuration, I have the boom stand directly behind my back
    and the boom stand/gooseneck drops down over my head. I have to position
    the mic relatively high and angle it down to keep it from being in the
    stick area. This setup is relatively comfortable, but it is not as good
    for crowd visibility since it covers much of my face.

    Recently, I tried putting the mic to the immediate left of my throne (like
    Keagy). At first I thought it would be uncomfortable, but it wasn't too
    bad really. I played Message in a Bottle using that configuration and I
    played it well, even though I was blindly hitting the tom toms when it
    goes "I hope that someone gets my..." (Fun song to sing and drum...)

    On stage, I will probably be rotated 45-90 degrees from the "usual"
    drummer setup. I'm keeping the left side of my kit relatively free of
    cymbals since it allows for better visibility and it's harder to hit the
    mic with a stick. I like the "Kelly Keagy" setup since it allows me to
    use a regular boom stand and have the mic angled upward rather than
    downward. This setup seems to allow for the best crowd visibility. I'm
    not too sure how comfortable it will be in the long run though and if it
    is really good to be twisted any more than you already have to be much of
    the time to sing and play drums.

    I'm interested in any comments or advice about vocal mic positioning for
    singing drummers. I'm also interested in hearing about the configurations
    that singing drummers in this newsgroup use.

    One more thing, I'm not going to use a headset mic, so don't give me that
    advice. :)

    Dan L.
  2. Joey Furr

    Joey Furr Guest

    "jdcfan" <drl7122@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:bhfccf$42d3$1@ID-148178.news.uni-berlin.de...

    ....clipped...

    > One more thing, I'm not going to use a headset mic, so don't give me that
    > advice. :)


    That's too bad. I have total freedom with my headset mic...and can move
    around the set naturally.

    --

    ....Joey
    "...so hold the mustard on those flames, y'all." - Aaron Draper


    >
    > Dan L.
    >
    >
  3. John P.

    John P. Guest

    "jdcfan" <drl7122@yahoo.com> wrote in a message

    > One more thing, I'm not going to use a headset mic, so don't give me that
    > advice. :)


    Well, then I have no advice for you. I hate having a mic on a boom anywhere
    near me. Even if I manage to have it out of my way, I can "feel" it near me
    and it bugs me. As for headset mics... I generally think that if you're not
    Brittany Spears or Janet Jackson, you should never use such a thing... but I
    also think drummers can get away with it more than the people out front.
    Phil Collins managed to pull it off rather well.
  4. Dan Radin

    Dan Radin Guest

    "jdcfan" <drl7122@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:bhfccf$42d3$1@ID-148178.news.uni-berlin.de...
    > I've been working on singing and drumming for the past few months and I've
    > made great progress. I've experimented with many different positions for
    > the mic, but I still haven't decided what is the best place for it. I
    > have a boom stand with a gooseneck attachment.


    If you're the "frontman", and you are interested in being a visual focal
    point, then I think you're on the right track with angling the kit to the
    right and turning to the left to face the audience. Many frontman pianists
    have done something like this over the years. If you're singing backup and
    aren't so worried about the audience seeing you, then I like the "drop" the
    mic in using a boom stand set up with the arm high and parallel to the
    floor, and then adding a short tilting adaptor (On Stage MSA-9502 Posi-Lok
    Mini-Mini Boom 7" http://www.sound-room.com/mofcart/osposilock.html) arm to
    bring the mic to my face. It's like a gooseneck in concept, but the angle is
    lockable, and there are less squeaks and creaks. Also, K&M has several
    clamp-on boom arm variations that are worth checking out.
  5. Lonny

    Lonny Guest

    If you are singing the lead, then the mic should be in front of you,
    making you face the audience. If you are singing third or fouth
    harmony, then anywhere you feel comfortable is fine. There really is
    no right or wrong. Some peeps use the boom in front of them while
    singing harmony, and then move it out of the way (even in the middle
    of the song) when finished with the singing duties. Whatever works
    for you is ok with me, as long as you are not dissing the audience.

    Lonny

    "jdcfan" <drl7122@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:<bhfccf$42d3$1@ID-148178.news.uni-berlin.de>...
    > I've been working on singing and drumming for the past few months and I've
    > made great progress. I've experimented with many different positions for
    > the mic, but I still haven't decided what is the best place for it. I
    > have a boom stand with a gooseneck attachment.
    >
    > I've been searching for videos and pictures of singing drummers to get
    > some more ideas and see if there was any kind of consensus on what the
    > best place for it is. I found a great video of Don Henley playing and
    > singing Hotel California. I also found a video of Karen Carpenter from
    > the Ed Sullivan show, but it looked like it was lip-synced. I also found
    > some old Night Ranger videos with Kelly Keagy. On those videos, Kelly has
    > the mic left of his throne and he turns his head toward his left shoulder
    > to sing (see the music video for "When You Close Your Eyes" for an
    > example).
    >
    > For my usual configuration, I have the boom stand directly behind my back
    > and the boom stand/gooseneck drops down over my head. I have to position
    > the mic relatively high and angle it down to keep it from being in the
    > stick area. This setup is relatively comfortable, but it is not as good
    > for crowd visibility since it covers much of my face.
    >
    > Recently, I tried putting the mic to the immediate left of my throne (like
    > Keagy). At first I thought it would be uncomfortable, but it wasn't too
    > bad really. I played Message in a Bottle using that configuration and I
    > played it well, even though I was blindly hitting the tom toms when it
    > goes "I hope that someone gets my..." (Fun song to sing and drum...)
    >
    > On stage, I will probably be rotated 45-90 degrees from the "usual"
    > drummer setup. I'm keeping the left side of my kit relatively free of
    > cymbals since it allows for better visibility and it's harder to hit the
    > mic with a stick. I like the "Kelly Keagy" setup since it allows me to
    > use a regular boom stand and have the mic angled upward rather than
    > downward. This setup seems to allow for the best crowd visibility. I'm
    > not too sure how comfortable it will be in the long run though and if it
    > is really good to be twisted any more than you already have to be much of
    > the time to sing and play drums.
    >
    > I'm interested in any comments or advice about vocal mic positioning for
    > singing drummers. I'm also interested in hearing about the configurations
    > that singing drummers in this newsgroup use.
    >
    > One more thing, I'm not going to use a headset mic, so don't give me that
    > advice. :)
    >
    > Dan L.
  6. Aaron Draper

    Aaron Draper Guest

    I've been singing and drumming for 10 years, with about 5 years apiece using
    a headset and a mic with a boom. I've found that the Kelly Keagy setup
    works best for me, as I'm usually backed into a corner or against a wall,
    and a stand behind me with an overhead gooseneck won't be practical most of
    the time. I place the stand to my left, with the boom angled upward
    slightly. The mic is so positioned that when I'm singing directly into it,
    I'm facing straight forward or only slightly to the left. Try to keep your
    neck in as neutral a position as possible to avoid chronic injury or pain.
    Don Henley said not too long ago that he still has back problems now and
    then, from contorting his body to sing into his mic. Practice with the mic
    in front of you, and you'll get used to not hitting it, and you'll forget
    it's even there. I hope this helps.

    Oh, and I'm not sure what configuration you're looking for, but I play a
    standard 12-13-16-22 5 piece kit, with 2 crashes and one ride. The mic is an
    SM58. The musical style is pop/rock.

    --
    Aaron Draper
    www.baileyscomet.net
    ----------
    "Does he think he's Ponce d' Moongel?"
    -Sam Savoca
    jdcfan wrote in message ...
    >I've been working on singing and drumming for the past few months and I've
    >made great progress. I've experimented with many different positions for
    >the mic, but I still haven't decided what is the best place for it. I
    >have a boom stand with a gooseneck attachment.
    >
    >I've been searching for videos and pictures of singing drummers to get
    >some more ideas and see if there was any kind of consensus on what the
    >best place for it is. I found a great video of Don Henley playing and
    >singing Hotel California. I also found a video of Karen Carpenter from
    >the Ed Sullivan show, but it looked like it was lip-synced. I also found
    >some old Night Ranger videos with Kelly Keagy. On those videos, Kelly has
    >the mic left of his throne and he turns his head toward his left shoulder
    >to sing (see the music video for "When You Close Your Eyes" for an
    >example).
    >
    >For my usual configuration, I have the boom stand directly behind my back
    >and the boom stand/gooseneck drops down over my head. I have to position
    >the mic relatively high and angle it down to keep it from being in the
    >stick area. This setup is relatively comfortable, but it is not as good
    >for crowd visibility since it covers much of my face.
    >
    >Recently, I tried putting the mic to the immediate left of my throne (like
    >Keagy). At first I thought it would be uncomfortable, but it wasn't too
    >bad really. I played Message in a Bottle using that configuration and I
    >played it well, even though I was blindly hitting the tom toms when it
    >goes "I hope that someone gets my..." (Fun song to sing and drum...)
    >
    >On stage, I will probably be rotated 45-90 degrees from the "usual"
    >drummer setup. I'm keeping the left side of my kit relatively free of
    >cymbals since it allows for better visibility and it's harder to hit the
    >mic with a stick. I like the "Kelly Keagy" setup since it allows me to
    >use a regular boom stand and have the mic angled upward rather than
    >downward. This setup seems to allow for the best crowd visibility. I'm
    >not too sure how comfortable it will be in the long run though and if it
    >is really good to be twisted any more than you already have to be much of
    >the time to sing and play drums.
    >
    >I'm interested in any comments or advice about vocal mic positioning for
    >singing drummers. I'm also interested in hearing about the configurations
    >that singing drummers in this newsgroup use.
    >
    >One more thing, I'm not going to use a headset mic, so don't give me that
    >advice. :)
    >
    >Dan L.
    >
    >
  7. jdcfan

    jdcfan Guest

    "Aaron Draper" <baileyscomet@cablespeed.com> wrote:
    > I've been singing and drumming for 10 years, with about 5 years apiece
    > using a headset and a mic with a boom.


    Just out of curiosity, did you switch from using a boom to a headset?

    > I've found that the Kelly Keagy setup works best for me, as I'm usually
    > backed into a corner or against a wall, and a stand behind me with an
    > overhead gooseneck won't be practical most of the time. I place the
    > stand to my left, with the boom angled upward slightly. The mic is so
    > positioned that when I'm singing directly into it, I'm facing straight
    > forward or only slightly to the left.


    I usually have the mic angled downward so it is out of my way just a
    little bit more. I also have it positioned so that I have turn a little
    to my left to sing (not much though).

    > Try to keep your neck in as neutral a position as possible to avoid
    > chronic injury or pain. Don Henley said not too long ago that he still
    > has back problems now and then, from contorting his body to sing into
    > his mic. Practice with the mic in front of you, and you'll get used to
    > not hitting it, and you'll forget it's even there. I hope this helps.


    That was one of my concerns. Maybe I'll go with something in between
    facing straight forward and almost singing over my left shoulder. I'll
    probably flatten the mic angle a little more and maybe tilt it upwards
    slightly.

    > Oh, and I'm not sure what configuration you're looking for, but I play a
    > standard 12-13-16-22 5 piece kit, with 2 crashes and one ride. The mic
    > is an SM58. The musical style is pop/rock.


    I'm mainly interested in special configurations due to singing and
    drumming. For instance, I have my crash placed in a different spot than
    normal to increase visibility and prevent hitting the mic with a stick. I
    use an Audix OM-2 mic. It's good because it is a very tight patterned
    mic, so it rejects more of the kit, but you have to sing directly into it.

    Good post, thanks...

    Dan L.
  8. jdcfan

    jdcfan Guest

    "Dan Radin" <danradin@snet.net> wrote:
    >
    > If you're the "frontman", and you are interested in being a visual focal
    > point, then I think you're on the right track with angling the kit to
    > the right and turning to the left to face the audience. Many frontman
    > pianists have done something like this over the years.


    I intend to sing lead on over 60% of the show. I will sing backup on most
    of the other songs. I really want to be as close to the audience as
    possible and be as visible as possible. But I don't want to compromise my
    playing or comfort too much.

    > If you're singing backup and aren't so worried about the audience seeing
    > you, then I like the "drop" the mic in using a boom stand set up with
    > the arm high and parallel to the floor, and then adding a short tilting
    > adaptor (On Stage MSA-9502 Posi-Lok Mini-Mini Boom 7"
    > http://www.sound-room.com/mofcart/osposilock.html) arm to
    > bring the mic to my face. It's like a gooseneck in concept, but the
    > angle is lockable, and there are less squeaks and creaks. Also, K&M has
    > several clamp-on boom arm variations that are worth checking out.


    Thanks for the suggestion, for around $10, I will have to pick up one of
    those regardless of what setup I choose.

    Dan L.
  9. Martin Frye

    Martin Frye Guest

    I am currently singing about 50% of our book (Classic Rock) and I use the
    same setup as you whenever possible. If rear space doesn't permit it, I set
    the stand to my right, keep the boom at the same height, and drop the
    gooseneck down from there. I really don't have a visibility issue with the
    audience, but I do wish we could get an unobstructed picture of me for
    posters etc.

    Incidently, I tried a headset mic and it was extremely uncomfortable for me.
    Perhaps I didn't give it enough time.

    Marty


    "jdcfan" <drl7122@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:bhfccf$42d3$1@ID-148178.news.uni-berlin.de...
    > I've been working on singing and drumming for the past few months and I've
    > made great progress. I've experimented with many different positions for
    > the mic, but I still haven't decided what is the best place for it. I
    > have a boom stand with a gooseneck attachment.
    >
    > I've been searching for videos and pictures of singing drummers to get
    > some more ideas and see if there was any kind of consensus on what the
    > best place for it is. I found a great video of Don Henley playing and
    > singing Hotel California. I also found a video of Karen Carpenter from
    > the Ed Sullivan show, but it looked like it was lip-synced. I also found
    > some old Night Ranger videos with Kelly Keagy. On those videos, Kelly has
    > the mic left of his throne and he turns his head toward his left shoulder
    > to sing (see the music video for "When You Close Your Eyes" for an
    > example).
    >
    > For my usual configuration, I have the boom stand directly behind my back
    > and the boom stand/gooseneck drops down over my head. I have to position
    > the mic relatively high and angle it down to keep it from being in the
    > stick area. This setup is relatively comfortable, but it is not as good
    > for crowd visibility since it covers much of my face.
    >
    > Recently, I tried putting the mic to the immediate left of my throne (like
    > Keagy). At first I thought it would be uncomfortable, but it wasn't too
    > bad really. I played Message in a Bottle using that configuration and I
    > played it well, even though I was blindly hitting the tom toms when it
    > goes "I hope that someone gets my..." (Fun song to sing and drum...)
    >
    > On stage, I will probably be rotated 45-90 degrees from the "usual"
    > drummer setup. I'm keeping the left side of my kit relatively free of
    > cymbals since it allows for better visibility and it's harder to hit the
    > mic with a stick. I like the "Kelly Keagy" setup since it allows me to
    > use a regular boom stand and have the mic angled upward rather than
    > downward. This setup seems to allow for the best crowd visibility. I'm
    > not too sure how comfortable it will be in the long run though and if it
    > is really good to be twisted any more than you already have to be much of
    > the time to sing and play drums.
    >
    > I'm interested in any comments or advice about vocal mic positioning for
    > singing drummers. I'm also interested in hearing about the configurations
    > that singing drummers in this newsgroup use.
    >
    > One more thing, I'm not going to use a headset mic, so don't give me that
    > advice. :)
    >
    > Dan L.
    >
    >
  10. jdcfan

    jdcfan Guest

    "Martin Frye" <mfrye@neb.rr.com> wrote:
    >
    > Incidently, I tried a headset mic and it was extremely uncomfortable for
    > me. Perhaps I didn't give it enough time.


    It seems like people either love or hate headset mics. I've read about
    people who switched from boom mics to headset mics and they say they will
    never go back to boom mics. I've decided that I'm going to stick with a
    boom mic. Most of the famous singing drummers use the boom mic setup
    (Levon Helm, Don Henley, Peter Rivera, etc...) I think Kelly Keagy
    recently switched to a headset mic though...

    Dan L.
  11. Aaron Draper

    Aaron Draper Guest

    jdcfan wrote:

    <snip>

    To answer your questions, I went from a boom (3 years) to a headset (5
    years) back to a boom (2 years). Each has their advantages and
    disadvantages. But to be quite honest, the advantages of using a headset
    mic are few. I guess the fact that you don't need floor space for them, and
    the fact that they're harder to hit with a stick (although I sure had little
    trouble nailing it) might be a couple. The disadvantages are many, again
    IMHO. Bear in mind that the ONLY headset I used was a Shure SM10A, hardly
    the industry gold standard, but considered a solid headset mic. The band
    had a hard time getting enough volume out of my SM10A. I could never
    position it *quite* where I wanted it, the way it is designed, and every
    time I wanted to adjust it at all, I had to unscrew an adjustment nut,
    adjust, and then screw it back. They can be uncomfortable, and pull hair
    out. You can't wear it with a cowboy hat. :) If you needed to say
    something off mic, it is a pain. For going back and forth between singing
    background vocals and lead vocals (I sing one or the other in every song),
    it was hard to adjust the proximity. If you have to cough in the middle of
    a song, you're hit (unless you have a "Cough Drop" type of foot switch, and
    you know it's coming). People call you Garth or Britney. When I went back
    to a boom and an SM58, the band told me they secretly wanted me to for a
    long time. The change of mics was done without adjusting one cymbal
    placement. It's good to be back. Having said all that, there are many
    drummers better than me in here that swear by them, as I once did. Thanks
    for your interest.

    --
    Aaron Draper
    www.baileyscomet.net
    ----------
    "Does he think he's Ponce d' Moongel?"
    -Sam Savoca
  12. jdcfan

    jdcfan Guest

    "Aaron Draper" <baileyscomet@cablespeed.com> wrote:
    >
    > To answer your questions, I went from a boom (3 years) to a headset (5
    > years) back to a boom (2 years). Each has their advantages and
    > disadvantages. But to be quite honest, the advantages of using a
    > headset mic are few.


    That is interesting perspective. Usually I hear people say that headsets
    have more advantages. I listened to their points and some were good, but
    I was never sold on the headset mic.

    > For going back and forth between singing background vocals and lead
    > vocals (I sing one or the other in every song), it was hard to adjust
    > the proximity.


    Good point there. I use a decent amount of mic technique when singing.

    > People call you Garth or Britney.


    I don't ever want my name associated with either of them...

    > Thanks for your interest.


    Thanks for the good info.

    Dan L.
  13. jdcfan <drl7122@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > "Martin Frye" <mfrye@neb.rr.com> wrote:
    >> Incidently, I tried a headset mic and it was extremely uncomfortable for
    >> me. Perhaps I didn't give it enough time.


    > It seems like people either love or hate headset mics. I've read about
    > people who switched from boom mics to headset mics and they say they will
    > never go back to boom mics. I've decided that I'm going to stick with a
    > boom mic. Most of the famous singing drummers use the boom mic setup
    > (Levon Helm, Don Henley, Peter Rivera, etc...) I think Kelly Keagy
    > recently switched to a headset mic though...


    The reason "famous" singing drummers use a boom is the same reason
    most decent singers don't like headsets. A decent singer plays
    the mic as if it's an instrument! By controling the distance
    from you to the mic you get great advantages especially in
    controlling "blasting" and overload. Just watch any decent
    singer "play" the mic. A headset not only makes you look geeky,
    but it also is fixed to your head. You can't control the sound
    by turning away or increasing the mouth to mic distance. When
    your voice is your instrument you don't want to throw away half
    your control over your sound. A headset might be OK for
    backup singing or the like, but I think most singers would find
    real disadvantages with a headset rig. The biggest headset advantage
    doesn't even apply to a drummer (well drumest drummer anyway)
    and that is it allows you to romp all over stage Garth-like.
    That doesn't mean much when your butt is firmly planted on
    a drum throne!

    Benj
    --
    SPAM-Guard! Remove .users (if present) to email me!
  14. jdcfan

    jdcfan Guest

    <bjacoby@users.iwaynet.net> wrote:
    >
    > The reason "famous" singing drummers use a boom is the same reason
    > most decent singers don't like headsets. A decent singer plays
    > the mic as if it's an instrument! By controling the distance
    > from you to the mic you get great advantages especially in
    > controlling "blasting" and overload. Just watch any decent
    > singer "play" the mic. A headset not only makes you look geeky,
    > but it also is fixed to your head. You can't control the sound
    > by turning away or increasing the mouth to mic distance.


    I agree. It would be much more difficult to use any mic technique with a
    headset mic. It's difficult to use good mic technique with a boom mic
    while drumming, but I try at least. When I am singing softer parts, I
    move closer up to the mic and when I have to belt it out, I move back.

    Dan L.
  15. -MIKE-

    -MIKE- Guest

    Ever see one of those idiotic looking lavaliere-type wire and clip
    devices that hangs around the neck, resting on the chest, holding a
    wireless handheld mic out from a guy's chest, so he can walk around
    talking? It's usually those late-night, public access preachers
    that wear them. :)


    -MIKE-

    --
    http://mikedrums.com
    mike@mikedrumsDOT.com
    ---remove "DOT" ^^^^ to reply
  16. ramalane

    ramalane Guest

    "jdcfan" <drl7122@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:bhhrf0$s22r$1@ID-148178.news.uni-berlin.de...
    > <bjacoby@users.iwaynet.net> wrote:
    > >
    > > The reason "famous" singing drummers use a boom is the same reason
    > > most decent singers don't like headsets. A decent singer plays
    > > the mic as if it's an instrument! By controling the distance
    > > from you to the mic you get great advantages especially in
    > > controlling "blasting" and overload. Just watch any decent
    > > singer "play" the mic. A headset not only makes you look geeky,
    > > but it also is fixed to your head. You can't control the sound
    > > by turning away or increasing the mouth to mic distance.

    >
    > I agree. It would be much more difficult to use any mic technique with a
    > headset mic. It's difficult to use good mic technique with a boom mic
    > while drumming, but I try at least. When I am singing softer parts, I
    > move closer up to the mic and when I have to belt it out, I move back.


    Are you sure that you don't have that backwards?

    /ramalane

    --
    Church of the Swimming Elephant
    http://www.cotse.com
    Have you been to church today?
  17. ramalane

    ramalane Guest

    "-MIKE-" <mike@mikedrumsDOT.com> wrote in message
    news:LtScnTYomcmDH6GiXTWJgA@comcast.com...
    > Ever see one of those idiotic looking lavaliere-type wire and clip
    > devices that hangs around the neck, resting on the chest, holding a
    > wireless handheld mic out from a guy's chest, so he can walk around
    > talking? It's usually those late-night, public access preachers
    > that wear them. :)


    That would never work for me...I hate to admit it but I've knocked my
    glasses off with the tip of a stick on cross-overs. <snarf>

    /ramalane

    --
    Church of the Swimming Elephant
    http://www.cotse.com
    Have you been to church today?
  18. ramalane <ramalane@ramalanetinr.com> wrote:
    >> When I am singing softer parts, I
    >> move closer up to the mic and when I have to belt it out, I move back.


    > Are you sure that you don't have that backwards?


    Nope. He has it right! I take it you don't sing. You move closer
    on soft part to give a more intimate sound while on loud parts
    you move back so that you voice carries the sound of volume
    without actually being louder in the PA/recording etc. The
    actual electronic volume stays pretty much the same to the
    listener while the "impression" of your singing volume
    changes dramatically. It makes your singing much more
    effective than the normal rock star "eat the mic" as if you
    were gay and it was a large tumescent choad!

    Benj
    --
    SPAM-Guard! Remove .users (if present) to email me!
  19. In article <D5CdnWD4-5P7C6aiU-KYgg@comcast.com>, Joey Furr
    <joeyfurr@yahoo.com> wrote:

    > "jdcfan" <drl7122@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:bhfccf$42d3$1@ID-148178.news.uni-berlin.de...
    >
    > ...clipped...
    >
    > > One more thing, I'm not going to use a headset mic, so don't give me that
    > > advice. :)

    >
    > That's too bad. I have total freedom with my headset mic...and can move
    > around the set naturally.


    The bad thing about headsets is that you can't get away from them to
    belch or tell a crude joke to the bass player. A definite disadvantage
    IMHO. Plus, they just look dorky.

    I've used an AKG tripod boom stand for years with a 12" gooseneck. The
    boom is over my head and the mic drops down and slightly to the left
    with the mic (a Shure Beta 58A) angled in toward me. I can see straight
    ahead just fine.

    And also, I sing lead AND harmonies.

    --
    Rev. Poindexter (masquerading as Scott Logsdon) - rev@NOSPAMsonormuseum.com
    visit the Unofficial Sonor Virtual Museum --- www.sonormuseum.com
    ** - ** - ** - ** - **
    Frank Zappa isn't dead, he just smells funny
  20. Joey Furr

    Joey Furr Guest

    "Rev. Poindexter" <poindexter@NOSPAMsubgenius.com> wrote in message
    news:170820031647160754%poindexter@NOSPAMsubgenius.com...
    > In article <D5CdnWD4-5P7C6aiU-KYgg@comcast.com>, Joey Furr
    > <joeyfurr@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    > > "jdcfan" <drl7122@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > > news:bhfccf$42d3$1@ID-148178.news.uni-berlin.de...
    > >
    > > ...clipped...
    > >
    > > > One more thing, I'm not going to use a headset mic, so don't give me

    that
    > > > advice. :)

    > >
    > > That's too bad. I have total freedom with my headset mic...and can move
    > > around the set naturally.

    >
    > The bad thing about headsets is that you can't get away from them to
    > belch or tell a crude joke to the bass player. A definite disadvantage
    > IMHO. Plus, they just look dorky.


    An understandable concern. Shure includes a schematic for a silent-operation
    drop switch in the manual, which I built immediately after aquiring the mic.

    I've been thinking about trying out a 58 on a boom/gooseneck...as I will
    admit that the headset has always been very low gain.

    I would have to get used to the huge gooseneck/mic in front of my face.

    --

    ....Joey
    "...so hold the mustard on those flames, y'all." - Aaron Draper

    >
    > I've used an AKG tripod boom stand for years with a 12" gooseneck. The
    > boom is over my head and the mic drops down and slightly to the left
    > with the mic (a Shure Beta 58A) angled in toward me. I can see straight
    > ahead just fine.
    >
    > And also, I sing lead AND harmonies.
    >
    > --
    > Rev. Poindexter (masquerading as Scott Logsdon) -

    rev@NOSPAMsonormuseum.com
    > visit the Unofficial Sonor Virtual Museum --- www.sonormuseum.com
    > ** - ** - ** - ** - **
    > Frank Zappa isn't dead, he just smells funny

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