What is it called when?

Discussion in 'rec.audio.pro' started by Julian Russell, Jul 18, 2003.

  1. Make sure you spell it correctly. Pug's spelling was quite a cute pun. But
    I wonder of the snare knocking isn't moreso called a rimjob.

    --


    Roger W. Norman
    SirMusic Studio
    Roger@SirMusicStudio.com
    301-585-4681




    "Julian Russell" <info@magpiesound.com> wrote in message
    news:_AKSa.21851$7O.14499@nwrdny01.gnilink.net...
    > Oh... yes, as to your prize... many thanks.. and if you are ever in

    Boston,
    > I'll buy you a beer.. or coffee or whatever you pleaseure.
    >
    > That word has really been bugging me!
    >
    > Julian Russell
    > http://magpiesound.com
    >
    >
    > "Ralph & Diane Barone" <rdbarone@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > news:BB40B6EC9668113E22@192.168.0....
    > > In article <20030719002512.07566.00000120@mb-m14.aol.com>,
    > > pugnut99@aol.com (Pugnut99) wrote:
    > >
    > > >Cymbalism

    > >
    > > Dammit, this question's been driving me crazy for the last couple days,
    > > since I remember seeing the answer SOMEWHERE before, and I thought it

    was
    > > on rec.audio.pro.
    > >
    > > PROSODY! From the Mixerman chronicles, 21 Nov 2002
    > >
    > > Then, one must consider the fact that without a lyric, one relinquishes

    > the
    > > possibility of the use of prosody; that-is performing the music so as to
    > > take the lyric literally. The simplest example of this being the music
    > > stopping on the word "Stop" which happens in countless songs. "Stop...In
    > > the name of love."; You gotta stop...children, what's that sound,

    > everybody
    > > look what's goin' round."
    > >
    > > Man, I better get a prize for this...
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
  2. no spam

    no spam Guest

    On 19 Jul 2003 04:25:12 GMT, pugnut99@aol.com (Pugnut99) wrote:

    >Cymbalism


    Now that's funny!
    I immediately thought of onomatopoeia, but I don't think that is it.
    That's where you use a word that sounds like the sound it describes
    like "ding" or "buzz".
    I'll be curious to know if there is a word for what you are asking
    about.

    Paul Gitlitz
    Glitchless Productions
    www.glitchless.net
  3. no spam

    no spam Guest

    On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 04:15:16 GMT, rdbarone@shaw.ca (Ralph & Diane
    Barone) wrote:

    >In article <20030719002512.07566.00000120@mb-m14.aol.com>,
    >pugnut99@aol.com (Pugnut99) wrote:
    >
    >>Cymbalism

    >
    >Dammit, this question's been driving me crazy for the last couple days,
    >since I remember seeing the answer SOMEWHERE before, and I thought it was
    >on rec.audio.pro.
    >
    >PROSODY! From the Mixerman chronicles, 21 Nov 2002
    >
    >Then, one must consider the fact that without a lyric, one relinquishes the
    >possibility of the use of prosody; that-is performing the music so as to
    >take the lyric literally. The simplest example of this being the music
    >stopping on the word "Stop" which happens in countless songs. "Stop...In
    >the name of love."; You gotta stop...children, what's that sound, everybody
    >look what's goin' round."
    >
    >Man, I better get a prize for this...
    >

    Wouldn't you know it. It was in the next post after I responded. I
    should read them all first I suppose, but then I'd never post
    anything.

    Paul Gitlitz
    Glitchless Productions
    www.glitchless.net
  4. no spam

    no spam Guest

    On Fri, 18 Jul 2003 22:14:13 -0700, Danny Taddei
    <barrelorum@netscape.net> wrote:

    >I think you are looking for "call and answer".


    This is technically known as antiphony.

    Paul Gitlitz
    Glitchless Productions
    www.glitchless.net
  5. no spam

    no spam Guest

    On 19 Jul 2003 16:27:57 GMT, tmuska@aol.com (Tmuska) wrote:

    >There is a musical term from Renaissance vocal music called "text painting" or
    >"word painting" where the music matches the text. Running up the hill =
    >ascending line. "Two by two" has two voices. Birds singing is matched by violin
    >trills, etc. There's probably a more contemporary term for this - Or someone
    >will come up with one.
    >Terry
    >TMuska@aol.com


    Call me an old fart, but I love this sort of arranging. Perhaps it's
    because I do a lot of kids albums.
    Paul Gitlitz
    Glitchless Productions
    www.glitchless.net
  6. PROSODY!

    Read it in Mixerman... Ralph got it!

    Thanks man

    Julian Russell
    http://magpiesound.com


    "Ralph & Diane Barone" <rdbarone@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    news:BB40B6EC9668113E22@192.168.0....

    >
    > Dammit, this question's been driving me crazy for the last couple days,
    > since I remember seeing the answer SOMEWHERE before, and I thought it was
    > on rec.audio.pro.
    >
    > PROSODY! From the Mixerman chronicles, 21 Nov 2002
    >
    > Then, one must consider the fact that without a lyric, one relinquishes

    the
    > possibility of the use of prosody; that-is performing the music so as to
    > take the lyric literally. The simplest example of this being the music
    > stopping on the word "Stop" which happens in countless songs. "Stop...In
    > the name of love."; You gotta stop...children, what's that sound,

    everybody
    > look what's goin' round."
    >
    > Man, I better get a prize for this...
    >
    >









    "Julian Russell" <info@magpiesound.com> wrote in message
    news:K8XRa.9725$7O.5089@nwrdny01.gnilink.net...
    > a question for the rap brain trust
    >
    > you have a tune... the lyric sings, for instance, "stop" and the music
    > stops... or... " slow" and the music slows... etc...
    >
    > there is a term for it and it escapes me...
    >
    > thanks
    >
    > Julian Russell
    > http://magpiesound.com
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  7. Bob Ross

    Bob Ross Guest

    Julian Russell wrote:

    > PROSODY!
    >
    > Read it in Mixerman... Ralph got it!


    I'm afraid that's incorrect. "Prosody" refers to the stress and inflections of
    a lyric, and how those match with the stress and emphasis of a musical phrase.
    It is a description of metric phenomena: how the placement of strong/weak
    musical beats corresponds (or doesn't) to strong/weak syllables.

    The word you are looking for may be "Mickey-Mousing". That's a mid-20th
    Century film scoring term to describe a musical score which attempts to mimic
    the screen action literally.

    /Bob Ross
  8. Actually, it dates back to the late 20s, when sound film was introduced -- qv,
    "Steamboat Willie."

    Max Steiner was notorious for his "Mickey Moused" scores. It works well in some
    movies, such as "King Kong," not so well in others.

    In "Dark Victory," Steiner actually scores Bette Davis walking up a flight of
    stairs. Davis didn't like it. "Either I am going to walk up those stairs, or Mr.
    Steiner is going to walk up those stairs, but not both of us." Steiner won.

    Modern films have increasingly long scores, with some films having hardly a
    moment that isn't musically "enhanced." However, Steiner was the first composer
    to heavily score films, such as "The Key." If you're musically sensitive, it can
    get Really Irritating, Really Fast.

    > The word you are looking for may be "Mickey-Mousing".
    > That's a mid-20th Century film scoring term to describe
    > a musical score which attempts to mimic the screen action
    > literally.
  9. Mike Rivers

    Mike Rivers Guest

    In article <3F1C34A2.59B33A2A@verizon.net> b.ross@verizon.net writes:

    > The word you are looking for may be "Mickey-Mousing". That's a mid-20th
    > Century film scoring term to describe a musical score which attempts to mimic
    > the screen action literally.


    I think he's looking for a term that describes when the singer says:
    "When I say 'stop', everybody freeze. And when I say 'do the boogie',
    everybody shake your booty." And then in the next phrase of the song
    he says "Stop" and a little later, he says "Do the boogie."

    I think that's called "lyrics." I really doubt that there's a
    classical name for it. It isn't classical. It's Tin Pan Alley.



    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
  10. "Julian Russell" <info@magpiesound.com> wrote in message news:<K8XRa.9725$7O.5089@nwrdny01.gnilink.net>...
    > a question for the rap brain trust
    >
    > you have a tune... the lyric sings, for instance, "stop" and the music
    > stops... or... " slow" and the music slows... etc...
    >
    > there is a term for it and it escapes me...



    Text Painting

    -Matt
  11. Mixerman

    Mixerman Guest

    Actually, the definition of prosidy amongst music writers is not necessarily
    limited to the placement of lyrical accents with musical beats. Yes, that is
    the main crux of prosody, but in broader terms prosody refers to the
    marriage of a lyric to the music. There is good prosody and bad prosody.
    Singing "stop" and stopping the music momentarily would typically be
    considered good prosody.

    This may 'technically' be a misuse of the word prosody, that I couldn't say
    as I'm not necessarily a scholar on the history of this particular word. But
    I know some very well respected writers that define this sort of
    literalization of lyric as prosody. I might also point out that the word
    "money" would never have had a definition of "friend" listed in the
    dictionary 15 years ago, as the use of a word is what ultimately defines it.

    Mixerman


    "Bob Ross" <b.ross@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:3F1C34A2.59B33A2A@verizon.net...
    > Julian Russell wrote:
    >
    > > PROSODY!
    > >
    > > Read it in Mixerman... Ralph got it!

    >
    > I'm afraid that's incorrect. "Prosody" refers to the stress and

    inflections of
    > a lyric, and how those match with the stress and emphasis of a musical

    phrase.
    > It is a description of metric phenomena: how the placement of strong/weak
    > musical beats corresponds (or doesn't) to strong/weak syllables.
    >
    > The word you are looking for may be "Mickey-Mousing". That's a mid-20th
    > Century film scoring term to describe a musical score which attempts to

    mimic
    > the screen action literally.
    >
    > /Bob Ross
    >
  12. Carey Carlan

    Carey Carlan Guest

    "Mixerman" <mixer.man@verizon.net> wrote in
    news:v3BTa.15138$Qe5.10740@nwrddc03.gnilink.net:

    > Actually, the definition of prosidy amongst music writers is not
    > necessarily limited to the placement of lyrical accents with musical
    > beats. Yes, that is the main crux of prosody, but in broader terms
    > prosody refers to the marriage of a lyric to the music. There is good
    > prosody and bad prosody. Singing "stop" and stopping the music
    > momentarily would typically be considered good prosody.
    >
    > This may 'technically' be a misuse of the word prosody, that I
    > couldn't say as I'm not necessarily a scholar on the history of this
    > particular word. But I know some very well respected writers that
    > define this sort of literalization of lyric as prosody. I might also
    > point out that the word "money" would never have had a definition of
    > "friend" listed in the dictionary 15 years ago, as the use of a word
    > is what ultimately defines it.


    It also refers to matching the meter of the music to the meter of the
    lyrics. I don't listen to the radio much these days, but when I do I'm
    struck by the poor prosody (didn't know until now that it was called that)
    of most manufactured music. They grab a beat. Toss in a melody. Select a
    lyric at random. Pile them all together and make a song.
  13. joehenry

    joehenry Guest

    Hi Matt, I was checking out a website for finding people and put your
    name into Google. Out comes all these questions and comments by you
    and I was intrigued. I don't know if you access this site or not so I
    don't know if you will see this. Just checking.(G) Love, Dad


    fishtorte@earthlink.net (Matthew Champagne) wrote in message news:<7e51ee63.0307220943.85e93e5@posting.google.com>...
    > "Julian Russell" <info@magpiesound.com> wrote in message news:<K8XRa.9725$7O.5089@nwrdny01.gnilink.net>...
    > > a question for the rap brain trust
    > >
    > > you have a tune... the lyric sings, for instance, "stop" and the music
    > > stops... or... " slow" and the music slows... etc...
    > >
    > > there is a term for it and it escapes me...

    >
    >
    > Text Painting
    >
    > -Matt
  14. James Acker

    James Acker Guest

    Of course...Prosody can be WAY more subtle than that as well, or can work on
    more than just two levels.
    The whole song form (I think) can be a form for prosody... as well as
    distinct words out of the lyrics.

    Can be that when you sing about things speeding up, your lyrics also are
    using more short syllables....when the song expresses something taking a
    long time using words that stretch out.

    You guys all probably know this, I am just the master of stating the
    bleeding obvious....and I'm defending my title.



    --
    ====================================================
    Check out my original music at
    http://www.soundclick.com/bands/1/jackermusic.htm

    "In theory there is no difference between theory and practice,
    but not in practice."
    ====================================================

    "Julian Russell" <info@magpiesound.com> skrev i melding
    news:_AKSa.21851$7O.14499@nwrdny01.gnilink.net...
    > Oh... yes, as to your prize... many thanks.. and if you are ever in

    Boston,
    > I'll buy you a beer.. or coffee or whatever you pleaseure.
    >
    > That word has really been bugging me!
    >
    > Julian Russell
    > http://magpiesound.com
    >
    >
    > "Ralph & Diane Barone" <rdbarone@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    > news:BB40B6EC9668113E22@192.168.0....
    > > In article <20030719002512.07566.00000120@mb-m14.aol.com>,
    > > pugnut99@aol.com (Pugnut99) wrote:
    > >
    > > >Cymbalism

    > >
    > > Dammit, this question's been driving me crazy for the last couple days,
    > > since I remember seeing the answer SOMEWHERE before, and I thought it

    was
    > > on rec.audio.pro.
    > >
    > > PROSODY! From the Mixerman chronicles, 21 Nov 2002
    > >
    > > Then, one must consider the fact that without a lyric, one relinquishes

    > the
    > > possibility of the use of prosody; that-is performing the music so as to
    > > take the lyric literally. The simplest example of this being the music
    > > stopping on the word "Stop" which happens in countless songs. "Stop...In
    > > the name of love."; You gotta stop...children, what's that sound,

    > everybody
    > > look what's goin' round."
    > >
    > > Man, I better get a prize for this...
    > >
    > >

    >
    >

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