What is the best midi sequencer for the stage?

Discussion in 'Sequencing Hardware' started by gordon1, Sep 19, 2002.

  1. gordon1

    gordon1 New Member

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    The topic says it all!
    What is the best sequencer and how much?
  2. Nyxan

    Nyxan It wont hurt for long Staff Member Moderator

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    I don't know much about other sequencers but my Qy700 seem to fit the bill nicely. Its light, small, has a built in tone generator and can store songs (up to 20 depending on the size) plus I can edit the song while playing if need be. All in all a very versitile unit and all for the measley price of $2000.
  3. willi001

    willi001 New Member

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    I use a Korg Trinity and I love it..They can be expensive, but I think it is worth it because I use it for so much other stuff besides sequencing...
  4. lostdave

    lostdave 'EVIL' Mod

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    I used to use an alesis data disk..
    back in those days I used to ue a sampler as well..
    god I had some long click tracks intros while the damn thing sent systex bank load info

    Dave
  5. The Humble One

    The Humble One New Member

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    Hi there...I have both mpc3000 and triton...

    I find the mpc3000 more useful, 10 individual outputs, 2 midi in and 4 midi out, hence it can control more sound module, it is stable, easy to carry, sample etc...

    The triton has more advantage in that it has wicked sounds, higher sample rate, easier editing interface, its a samplerand of course on board keyboard.

    For da stage you will need something easy to carry, quick to edit, to store large sounds samples..

    Any of da mpc series or Korg (triton or trinity) will do
  6. dergy

    dergy New Member

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    Sound brush

    Definately the roland sound brush (SB-55). They don't make em anymore but are a gem if you can get hold of em. These babies operate like a CD player, you can even program the order in which the sequences play. And it takes DOS disks (720k), so you can save from your PC or MAC onto the disk and straight into the SB55.

    Limiting factors are, of course, the 720K disk size and load time. A mate has two going, so he can double the choice of what to play.

    The only way i'd upgrade it is to one that has a hard disk.
  7. Nyxan

    Nyxan It wont hurt for long Staff Member Moderator

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    I have the same trouble with my QY700. I can program up to 2megs worth of songs which isn't much if you use large sequences. However this way I can edit songs as we play if need be. The only other way to get faster turnaround between songs it to preplay the midi but then I can't play with it. I just wish the QY came with a bigger memory.
  8. delhsn

    delhsn New Member

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    Yamaha PSR730

    We use the Yamaha PSR 730 ... we have 2 of them, usually play the midi through one and play along on the other ... this has the added benefit of a backup machine in case of the unthinkable happening!

    The PSR730 is a great 66-key keyboard, plays 64 voices simultaneously. Plays 1.44 meg disks, and plays almost every .mid and .kar file I've ever downloaded flawlessly. A friend of mine bought a "top of the line Casio" and he can only play about 30% of the stuff he downloads.

    In addition it's very easy to change instrumentation and volume levels. All in all, for my money ($499 at Mars Music scratch n'dent sale ... this keyboard had no scratches or dents, it was just last year's model) ... I don't think I could have done any better. Of course, it doesn't have weighted keys like the Triton ... but at about 1/10th of the cost, I can live with that :)
  9. sheffers

    sheffers New Member

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    For a sequencer without a tone genrator, the MC50 is my favorite. I use two and believe they can still be acquired on eBay for less than $300.

    Two MIDI outputs accomodates up to 32 channels for complex configurations.
    :thumbsup:
  10. saxman158

    saxman158 New Member

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    I use a Roland XP-50 and a 486 notebook pc, I use both for speed
    any questions about my set up please post.
  11. ABALLARD36

    ABALLARD36 New Member

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    I use a Yamaha QY20, which was my first sequencer and now use the QY700. Both are very reliable and functional for my needs. I am in the market for a good keyboard/soundboard combo and would like suggestions.
  12. peachman

    peachman New Member

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    QY700 (great sequencer!)

    :thumbsup: Hi, i've been using a yamaha QY700 sequencer for live work for over 3 years now. This is a very versitile unit, largely due to the two pairs of midi ins & outs. I currently use mine with an old yamaha SY85 & a new yamaha SO3, it's great has a large user interface and is very bright ( ideal for poor lit stages.) Even the onboard sounds are pretty reasonable and 64 note polyphony is plenty for anything i've done. loading times are very quick (especially when the files are saved as QY700 files,) all together a great piece of kit for live work, i would highly recomend it.
  13. yoda

    yoda New Member

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    Being new Here I would like to know if anyone has a Korg Karma and if they do any tips would be appreciated. My setup includes Karma, Roland d-20,korg o3r/w and a Stacy2 computer with Creator/notator software.
  14. danyj

    danyj New Member

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    A lap top computer with cakewalk. You have to have a separate sound module but there is a lot of quality out there for not a lot of money. Thousands of files can be right at you fingertips.
    That's the way to go.
  15. saxmidiman

    saxmidiman Member

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    If you can't afford a laptop, just pick a midifiler. I used a Yamaha MDF-2 for years. The MDF-3 can use the Hight density disks and should be able to hold quite a few songs. Pick up a Yamaha MU15 and you should be rockin'. It has reasonable quality sounds. You should get both for fairly cheap.
  16. Rod

    Rod New Member

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    saxman158's set-up?

    saxman158, I'd be interested in knowing more about yours and other pc/sm set-ups of any others as they seem both fast and versitile. Has anyone ever run into large problems with this config and are they as reliable as the dedicated devices listed above?
  17. Vangsgaard

    Vangsgaard New Member

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    Go Pro

    Why not go for a 1 GHz Apple PowerBook, a firewire interface, Logic 5 and...

    The list could go on - I have seen a lot of players go for this solution lately - Namedropping - What about Herbie Hancock for one
  18. JeremiahX

    JeremiahX New Member

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  19. dmanley

    dmanley New Member

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    It would be great to know a little more about your project. "For the stage" could mean a lot of things? Are you a solo perfromer or with a band? What do you expect to do with MIDI while on stage? Are you the keyboardist? Do you have a computer? What keyboard(s)/workstations do you have to work with?
  20. chasjules

    chasjules New Member

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    I'll show my age!! The first sequencer I used was a Korg SQD-1 (nicknamed the "squid") in 1985-86. It was a 31/2 inch mini disk-based sequencer that only recorded data from a keyboard. You could only hold 5 songs (unlabelled) per disk; had to manually set the speed/tempo (if you wanted to slow down, you need to turn the trempo key manually); and you could not edit the file once recorded (you had to re-record if you made an error).
    Now I use a Roland G-1000 weighted keyboard for live performances. It has both a floppy drive and inbuilt Zip drive, and has a SCSI port for external connections. The beauty of this keyboard is that it has "performance" buttons which allow you to store 198 different structures (ie. one button may hold the midi file you wish to play, plus sys-ex instructions, plus EQ adjustments, plus effect, etc). This means you can store 198 different midi files and their changes, and access each file at a press of a button. Who says old dogs can't learn new tricks!

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