Wiring question.

Discussion in 'rec.music.guitar' started by Adam Casey, Aug 27, 2003.

  1. Adam Casey

    Adam Casey Guest

    Howdy,

    I found this guitar for $7 at a second hand store and am working on
    rewiring it.

    http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid74/pecd8f8bb6cf5fc75893d44b4cce17467/fb633d9b.jpg

    Both the volume and tone pots as well as the jack are corroded so all
    of those are being replaced, I'll also be using new wire.

    The only upclose wiring I've seen before is on a Squier strat with
    three pickups, so this one pickup should prove to be less complicated,
    but here's where it gets tricky.

    Apparantly in between the pieces of wood to build the body, they
    attached the grounding wire to the bridge, such that there's no real
    way to directly replace that bit of wire. So my question is, should I
    just strip some of the end of the wire and sotter it to a pot or could
    I drill a screw into the body or attach a piece of metal to the inside
    and make that my grounding wire?

    Thanks,
    -Adam
  2. Odin

    Odin Guest

    "Adam Casey" <adamccasey@yahoo.com> wrote in message

    > Howdy,
    >
    > I found this guitar for $7 at a second hand store and am

    working on
    > rewiring it.
    >
    >

    http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid74/pecd8f8bb6cf5fc75893d44b4cce17467/fb633d9b.jpg
    >
    > Both the volume and tone pots as well as the jack are

    corroded so all
    > of those are being replaced, I'll also be using new wire.


    Go here for assistance with oddball wiring diagrams or if
    you just want to experiment.

    http://www.guitarelectronics.com/diagrams.html


    > The only upclose wiring I've seen before is on a Squier

    strat with
    > three pickups, so this one pickup should prove to be less

    complicated,
    > but here's where it gets tricky.
    >
    > Apparantly in between the pieces of wood to build the

    body, they
    > attached the grounding wire to the bridge, such that

    there's no real
    > way to directly replace that bit of wire. So my question

    is, should I
    > just strip some of the end of the wire and sotter it to a

    pot or could
    > I drill a screw into the body or attach a piece of metal

    to the inside
    > and make that my grounding wire?


    If the existing ground wire is secure and in decent shape
    I'd solder to the existing wire. It should be grounded to
    the bridge most likely.
  3. Bruce Morgen

    Bruce Morgen Guest

    adamccasey@yahoo.com (Adam Casey) wrote:

    >Howdy,
    >
    >I found this guitar for $7 at a second hand store and am working on
    >rewiring it.
    >
    >http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid74/pecd8f8bb6cf5fc75893d44b4cce17467/fb633d9b.jpg
    >
    >Both the volume and tone pots as well as the jack are corroded so all
    >of those are being replaced, I'll also be using new wire.
    >
    >The only upclose wiring I've seen before is on a Squier strat with
    >three pickups, so this one pickup should prove to be less complicated,
    >but here's where it gets tricky.
    >
    >Apparantly in between the pieces of wood to build the body, they
    >attached the grounding wire to the bridge, such that there's no real
    >way to directly replace that bit of wire. So my question is, should I
    >just strip some of the end of the wire and sotter it to a pot or could
    >I drill a screw into the body or attach a piece of metal to the inside
    >and make that my grounding wire?
    >

    With some fairly rare
    execeptions, it's
    absolutely imperative
    that the bridge and/or
    tailpiece be reliably
    grounded -- and I can't
    think of any good reason
    not to make use of the
    existing wire. Even if
    the guitar's in awful
    shape, the conductive
    innards of plastic-
    insulated hookup wire are
    usually just fine, so the
    wire should be usable as
    long as it's freshly
    stripped and carefully
    soldered-to.

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