Yo Jack

Discussion in 'rec.music.guitar' started by Nobody, Aug 13, 2003.

  1. Nobody

    Nobody Guest

  2. "Nobody" <nobodyupstairs@aolDELETE.com> wrote in message news:<01c361b8$f1eb1ce0$90ca580c@715162529worldnet.att.net>...
    > How's the neck?


    It's doing great!

    I went to a chiropractor and he gave me a few adjustments,
    acupuncture,reiki,aroma therapy and had me join a drum circle group
    and amazingly, the herniated discs and nerve damage disappeared just
    like that! <snaps his fingers>

    Oops, sorry - I must have dozed off... Actually, the neck is pretty
    much the same. I'll probably end up having surgery in September. I'll
    email you offline.

    Jaz
  3. Odin

    Odin Guest

    "Jack A. Zucker" <jaz@jackzucker.com> wrote in message

    > > How's the neck?

    >
    > It's doing great!
    >
    > I went to a chiropractor and he gave me a few adjustments,
    > acupuncture,reiki,aroma therapy and had me join a drum circle group
    > and amazingly, the herniated discs and nerve damage disappeared just
    > like that! <snaps his fingers>


    <Atlas bait engaged>
  4. Atlas

    Atlas Guest

    x-no-archive: yes

    On Thu, 14 Aug 2003 21:00:48 GMT, "Odin" <res0jmoj@REMOVEverizon.net>
    wrote:

    ><Atlas bait engaged>


    Jack & Polfus do make quite a charming couple. Actually,
    tthey share a LOT of similarities.





    Atlas
  5. Odin

    Odin Guest

    "Atlas" <c1sublux@hotmail.comSPAM> wrote in message

    > ><Atlas bait engaged>

    >
    > Jack & Polfus do make quite a charming couple. Actually,
    > tthey share a LOT of similarities.


    Their apparent love of chiropractors is the most obvious.
  6. > "Atlas" <c1sublux@hotmail.comSPAM> wrote in message
    >
    > > ><Atlas bait engaged>

    > >
    > > Jack & Polfus do make quite a charming couple. Actually,
    > > tthey share a LOT of similarities.


    You and your massive ego/condescending smugness make a nice couple
    too. Quite charming, in fact. I'm sure that attitude translates to
    quite a caring and gentle bedside manner with your patients.
  7. Atlas

    Atlas Guest

    x-no-archive: yes

    On Fri, 15 Aug 2003 04:15:58 GMT, "Odin" <res0jmoj@REMOVEverizon.net>
    wrote:

    >Their apparent love of chiropractors is the most obvious.


    I can understand how one might initially think that. However,
    I'm convinced that chiropractic has absolutely nothing to do with it.
    If neither of them had ever met me online, and thus there were no
    subsequent frictions, neither of them would have ever said a single
    thing about chiropractic.

    That being said, there are a LOT of similarities between
    Polfus & Zucker. I'm sure you can come up with at least five - and
    within about two minutes.



    Atlas
  8. Odin

    Odin Guest

    "Jack A. Zucker" <jaz@jackzucker.com> wrote in message

    > > > ><Atlas bait engaged>
    > > >
    > > > Jack & Polfus do make quite a charming couple. Actually,
    > > > tthey share a LOT of similarities.

    >
    > You and your massive ego/condescending smugness......


    i·ro·ny ( P )
    n. pl. i·ro·nies

    The use of words to express something different from and often opposite to
    their literal meaning.
    An expression or utterance marked by a deliberate contrast between apparent
    and intended meaning.
    A literary style employing such contrasts for humorous or rhetorical
    effect. See Synonyms at wit1.
    Incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs
    An occurrence, result, or circumstance notable for such incongruity.
  9. "Odin" wrote:

    ><Atlas bait engaged>


    I think yer snagged on the bottom. Bummer, that was a new
    Rapala wasn't it ?




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  10. Nobody

    Nobody Guest

    Atlas <c1sublux@hotmail.comNOSPAM> wrote in article <2vtpjv0e0tlh2lvkf3oj7pdj20esbm2f4u@4ax.com>...

    > That being said, there are a LOT of similarities between
    > Polfus & Zucker. I'm sure you can come up with at least five - and
    > within about two minutes.
    > Atlas


    I don't consider being compared to Jack an insult.

    Sorry.

    --
    Jason
    http://www.geocities.com/nobody_upstairs
  11. Atlas

    Atlas Guest

    x-no-archive: yes

    On Fri, 15 Aug 2003 16:29:28 GMT, "Odin" <res0jmoj@REMOVEverizon.net>
    wrote:

    >i·ro·ny ( P ) <snip>


    I think you're heading in the right direction. However, a
    word that works even better than irony is "projection".

    pro·jec·tion [pr? jéksh?n] (plural pro·jec·tions) n

    psychology: unconscious transfer of inner mental life: the
    unconscious ascription of a personal thought, feeling, or impulse to
    somebody else, especially a thought or feeling considered undesirable



    AtLaS
  12. "Odin" <res0jmoj@REMOVEverizon.net> wrote in message news:<IT7%a.137
    > i·ro·ny ( P )
    > n. pl. i·ro·nies


    Bwah-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!

    Dude - Look in the mirror sometime !

    Whew <knee slapping sound>.

    That one made my day.
  13. "Nobody" <nobodyupstairs@aolDELETE.com> wrote in message news:<01c3635b$5e9c9640$77c4580c@715162529worldnet.att.net>...
    > Atlas <c1sublux@hotmail.comNOSPAM> wrote in article <2vtpjv0e0tlh2lvkf3oj7pdj20esbm2f4u@4ax.com>...
    >
    > > That being said, there are a LOT of similarities between
    > > Polfus & Zucker. I'm sure you can come up with at least five - and
    > > within about two minutes.
    > > Atlas


    Just as there are similarities between Atlas and Daffy Duck...
  14. "Atlas" <c1sublux@hotmail.comXXXSPAM> wrote in message
    > psychology: unconscious transfer of inner mental life: the
    > unconscious ascription of a personal thought, feeling, or impulse to
    > somebody else, especially a thought or feeling considered undesirable


    Oh gawd - Another chiropractor and his meta-physical mumbo-jumbo. You do
    reiki, aromatherapy and drum circle too?!?
  15. Richard

    Richard Guest

    jaz@jackzucker.com wrote...

    > Oh gawd - Another chiropractor and his meta-physical mumbo-jumbo. You do
    > reiki, aromatherapy and drum circle too?!?


    You don't really want to get sucked any further into an argument with
    this guy, do you?
  16. You're right. I'm sorry. I guess it's just hard to "let go" sometimes. Point
    taken.

    "Richard" <rh310@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:MPG.19a86fb213781e139897d8@news.verizon.net...
    > jaz@jackzucker.com wrote...
    >
    > > Oh gawd - Another chiropractor and his meta-physical mumbo-jumbo. You do
    > > reiki, aromatherapy and drum circle too?!?

    >
    > You don't really want to get sucked any further into an argument with
    > this guy, do you?
    >
  17. Richard

    Richard Guest

    jaz@jackzucker.com wrote...
    > You're right. I'm sorry. I guess it's just hard to "let go" sometimes. Point
    > taken.


    Heck, no apology is needed. I'm pretty sure a flame fest is the last
    thing you want, but like you say it's just all too easy to take the
    bait.
  18. Atlas wrote:

    > I can understand how one might initially think that. However,
    >I'm convinced that chiropractic has absolutely nothing to do with it.


    Well, you know I've had good luck with my chiro. He's a
    cautious and smart guy. The first visit, he didn't do an adjustment,
    but did a muscular/movement evaluation, and an X-Ray series. I was
    suprised by the detail of the muscle/move technique - he totally
    isolated the problem with a couple of those moves - there were a few
    muscles and motions where I was weak as a kitten, and would never have
    suspected it. It wasn't until my Xrays were back we started on the
    therapy, after he made sure there were no herniations or worse.

    From Jack's posting, it sounds like the guy he went to was
    straight-up dangerous. It's no wonder he got put off. I would be too.
    It's a shame, because I think a good chiro would help him, but the
    whole scheme has been ruined for him now.

    >If neither of them had ever met me online, and thus there were no
    >subsequent frictions, neither of them would have ever said a single
    >thing about chiropractic.


    Nah. Lots of people here discuss CTS and stuff. It would have
    come up via that.



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  19. Atlas

    Atlas Guest

    x-no-archive: yes

    On Mon, 18 Aug 2003 13:56:27 GMT,
    jshinal_REMOVE_THIS_PART@mindspring.com (John S. Shinal) wrote:

    > Well, you know I've had good luck with my chiro. He's a
    >cautious and smart guy. The first visit, he didn't do an adjustment,
    >but did a muscular/movement evaluation, and an X-Ray series. I was
    >suprised by the detail of the muscle/move technique - he totally
    >isolated the problem with a couple of those moves - there were a few
    >muscles and motions where I was weak as a kitten, and would never have
    >suspected it. It wasn't until my Xrays were back we started on the
    >therapy, after he made sure there were no herniations or worse.


    Glad to hear you got good results. Chiropractors can't fix
    everybody. But then again, neither can M.D.'s. We both have our own
    scope of care. I practice a very conservative, evidence-based type of
    chiropractic, that has a very strong emphasis on structural correction
    and rehabilitation. One thing which I specialize in is correcting
    abnormal curves and abnormal posture (such as forward head posture,
    pelvic rotations, etc...).

    I have been able to reduce disc herniations with my techniques
    - to the point to where the patient was completely asymptomatic. No
    drugs, no surgery - just adjustsments, trigger point therapy,
    traction, and specific rehabilitative exercises to stabilize, and
    strengthen the supportive soft tissue structures.

    As far as the disc herniations, it depends on how bad the
    herniation is, where it is, and how long it's been there. If the
    nuclear material is extruded into the thecal sac, and has
    calcified...it's a surgical case.

    But most people aren't to that point. And they CAN have their
    problem managed conservatively.

    > From Jack's posting, it sounds like the guy he went to was
    >straight-up dangerous.


    Yeah - IF you believe Jack's story. I don't believe him. He
    bullshitted about the chiropractor asking him to come in seven days
    per week. Makes you wonder how much else of his story is pure
    fiction.

    >It's no wonder he got put off. I would be too.


    Spine surgery has an absolutely horrible track record. A
    couple of months ago, there was a spine symposium at Allegheny General
    Hospital (here in Pittsburgh). They had a panel of speakers which
    read as a veritable "who's who" in neuro and orthpedic surgery. And
    they admitted that their own success rate is abyssmal. There is a
    less than 50% chance of success. Compound that with a 1 in 10,000
    chance of death (due to general anesthesiology). Please see the
    following references:

    Basics of Anesthesia by Stoelting and Miller: (considered by some to
    be the bible of modern anesthesia practice). Here is the pertinent
    passage from the third edition:

    "An estimated 20 to 25 million anesthetics are administered annually
    in the United States. The risk of mortality due solely to the
    administration of anesthesia is extremely rare (about 1 in 10,000
    administrations, or 0.01%). " (p 12)

    Clinical Anesthesia Procedures of the Massachusetts General Hospital,
    edited by Hurford, Bailin, Davison, Haspel and Rosow, published 1997:

    "In the 1950s it was estimated that anesthesia care contributed to
    three deaths in 10,000 surgical procedures. More recent data suggest
    that the rate may be on the order of 1 per 10,000." (p 117)

    >It's a shame, because I think a good chiro would help him, but the
    >whole scheme has been ruined for him now.


    Jack posted some bullshit about chiropractors beating drums,
    magnets...and other things - trying to insinuate that this is
    commonplace. It's not. I've never done that. None of my
    chiropractic friends & colleagues do that. And I don't know of ANYONE
    who's done that.

    Jack was upset with the price of the chiropractic care -
    because he felt his chiropractor wanted to make a jag payment (or
    something like that).

    Let's look at this from a financial perspective. A typical
    chiropractic case costs about $1,500.00 (start to finish). An average
    spine surgery costs $50,000.00.

    So while Jack's offended that the chiropractor charged his
    fees, he's going to run to a neurosurgeon (who'll charge him 33 TIMES
    more). Now if that isn't Polfusian logic, I don't know what is.

    > Nah. Lots of people here discuss CTS and stuff. It would have
    >come up via that.


    Okay, perhaps I mis-phrased it. I should have said: "If
    neither of them had ever met me online, and thus there were no
    subsequent frictions, neither of them would have ever said a single
    negative thing about chiropractic.

    Jack will probably have a surgery done. And I despite all of
    the lovely things he's said to and about me, I do wish him the best of
    luck.





    Atlas
  20. Nobody

    Nobody Guest

    John S. Shinal <jshinal_REMOVE_THIS_PART@mindspring.com> wrote in article <3f40d9e3.599331281@text-east.newsfeeds.com>...

    > From Jack's posting, it sounds like the guy he went to was
    > straight-up dangerous. It's no wonder he got put off. I would be too.
    > It's a shame, because I think a good chiro would help him, but the
    > whole scheme has been ruined for him now.


    Uh-oh....you've unleashed the fuggin' fury, man!

    --
    Jason
    http://www.geocities.com/nobody_upstairs

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